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Websites with info / rankings for High Schools?


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#26 WaitForMe

Posted 11 March 2019 - 08:00 PM

All it takes is one falling out with a friend who then decides to dob...

#27 Kreme

Posted 11 March 2019 - 08:04 PM

At our school they hand out the high school enrolment  forms to the yr 6 students and ask them to confirm their address. So yes, you would need to ask your child to lie if you wanted them to attend the highly sought after school that is in the adjacent catchment.

#28 Sincerely

Posted 12 March 2019 - 06:02 AM

View Postwaawa17, on 11 March 2019 - 06:57 PM, said:


I also wonder how much of this "must send my kid to a 'better' public school" is about which schools are actually better, and how much is about socioeconomic status, real or perceived, and/or the effect SES has on test scores. Not talking about this particular case now, but in general.

The socioeducational status does have an effect but the SES of each school often evolves over time by positive or negative cycles (through out of area applications & student exodus), because for many decades, education has been left to the same market forces as everything else in our capitalistic society.

The literature suggests, however, that the socioeducational status of a student's family has a greater effect than the SES of the student's school, so a child with this background, who is intelligent & focused, is likely to be able to succeed anywhere (as other PPs have attested). A couple of such students in a year can have a significant effect on their cohort by setting positive examples & lifting the bar.

Edited by Sincerely, 12 March 2019 - 06:07 AM.


#29 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 13 March 2019 - 03:19 PM

View Postwaawa17, on 11 March 2019 - 06:57 PM, said:

I also wonder how much of this "must send my kid to a 'better' public school" is about which schools are actually better, and how much is about socioeconomic status, real or perceived, and/or the effect SES has on test scores. Not talking about this particular case now, but in general.

I think it can also be about people (understandably) projecting their own poor experiences of schooling and not wanting that for thier kids. Although I agree that this can be perceived rather than factual because schooling has changed a lot in that time period.

JF I believe you can be kicked out of a school if you move in some places. Or so I have heard, and read on here,  not sure if its true.
And I have been told SA is getting rid of sibling privileges too, so if an older sibling gets in out of zone doesn't mean the younger ones will.

Edited by WannabeMasterchef, 13 March 2019 - 03:24 PM.


#30 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 13 March 2019 - 03:35 PM

View PostHeather11, on 11 March 2019 - 11:17 AM, said:


As well as checking ATAR scores look at how many of the cohort have achieved their SACE.  At my children's HS 100% for the past few years and that includes those in the special education support class.

Do you know where we could find this information?

#31 waawa17

Posted 13 March 2019 - 04:21 PM

View PostSincerely, on 12 March 2019 - 06:02 AM, said:

The literature suggests, however, that the socioeducational status of a student's family has a greater effect than the SES of the student's school, so a child with this background,

Yes, that's what I mean. People pore over league tables and agreggated test scores, then decide that the higher ones must mean "better" schools. When all they mean most of the time is that the school draws from a higher SES population, nothing more.

And then there are people who outright don't want their child going to a school that draws from a lower SES population, because they think it might mean more exposure to illegal drugs, "the wrong kind of people", etc. (My personal 'elite' private school experience suggests that that assessment is an extraordinary level of misguided!)

Edited by waawa17, 13 March 2019 - 04:22 PM.


#32 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 13 March 2019 - 05:59 PM

View Postwaawa17, on 13 March 2019 - 04:21 PM, said:

And then there are people who outright don't want their child going to a school that draws from a lower SES population, because they think it might mean more exposure to illegal drugs, "the wrong kind of people", etc. (My personal 'elite' private school experience suggests that that assessment is an extraordinary level of misguided!)

Edited cos don't want to be too identifying

My personal experience was that I did very well at a low SES 'rough' school but it was really very hard work to get over some of the disadvantages and lack of facilities and lack of proper teaching -  it was a miserable time. DHs time was even worse.
I am aware that times have changed a lot and schools change but yes it does make me determined that my kids have a better experience that that which I had.

Edited by WannabeMasterchef, 13 March 2019 - 06:36 PM.


#33 Lees75

Posted 13 March 2019 - 07:12 PM

View PostWannabeMasterchef, on 13 March 2019 - 03:19 PM, said:


And I have been told SA is getting rid of sibling privileges too, so if an older sibling gets in out of zone doesn't mean the younger ones will.

Adelaide High School hasn't honoured sibling enrolments for quite some time now.

The other thing that concerns me about the SA High Schools in general is how focussed on specialised areas they are. I don't understand this considering that most kids won't have a choice.

OP, I'm not sure if the school you are zoned for is the one I am thinking of, but there is one R-12 school, previously a high school, that was a vocationally focussed school. There is another high school that is known as the "plumbing" high school. etc, etc. There are a number of musically focussed high schools. That's fine, but what if you are a violinist living in the zone of the plumbing school. Or vice versa.

#34 Expelliarmus

Posted 13 March 2019 - 07:24 PM

There are pathways into the specialist programs from out of zone.

You can apply to Walkerville, Marryatville or Playford International for the specialist music stream. I think there’s one down south as well ... Brighton?

You can apply for performing arts at Charles Campbell and Golden Grove.

You can apply for Ignite (SHIP) at Glenunga and the Heights.

You can apply for the sports specialist streams at Adelaide High, Norwood Morialta and Charles Campbell.

A lot of kids in (the now) Avenues (vocational) zone go to Charles Campbell an Golden Grove by applying for a specialist stream. I don’t think The Avenues is a vocational focus now it’s a B-12 though (?)

So there are pathways for the violinist in the ‘plumbing school’ zone. There are also regular options at schools with a specialist stream. We also investigated some options at a nearby school as ours didn’t have a subject. Didn’t need it in the end, but it was possible.

Ours also has a number of VET courses which I think is reasonably standard? Not sure about that though.

TL;DR there are lots of ways to access subjects and apply for specialist streams.

Edited by Expelliarmus, 13 March 2019 - 07:25 PM.


#35 Heather11

Posted 13 March 2019 - 09:18 PM

View PostWannabeMasterchef, on 13 March 2019 - 03:35 PM, said:

Do you know where we could find this information?

Most schools will publish it on their website, in the first newsletter of the year and/or Annual Report.

Schools that have an active facebook page will even share the results on their page when they are released.

ETA:  I just looked on the My School website.  If you go into the relevant school you can find how many achieved the SACE under the 'Senior Secondary' tab.

Edited by Heather11, 13 March 2019 - 09:38 PM.


#36 little lion

Posted 13 March 2019 - 09:23 PM

View PostWannabeMasterchef, on 13 March 2019 - 05:59 PM, said:



Edited cos don't want to be too identifying

My personal experience was that I did very well at a low SES 'rough' school but it was really very hard work to get over some of the disadvantages and lack of facilities and lack of proper teaching -  it was a miserable time. DHs time was even worse.
I am aware that times have changed a lot and schools change but yes it does make me determined that my kids have a better experience that that which I had.

I attended a small, medium to low SES high school. I found it hard to make like minded friends. I don’t want that for my children.

#37 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 14 March 2019 - 07:22 AM

View PostLees75, on 13 March 2019 - 07:12 PM, said:

The other thing that concerns me about the SA High Schools in general is how focussed on specialised areas they are. I don't understand this considering that most kids won't have a choice.
OP, I'm not sure if the school you are zoned for is the one I am thinking of, but there is one R-12 school, previously a high school, that was a vocationally focussed school. There is another high school that is known as the "plumbing" high school. etc, etc. There are a number of musically focussed high schools. That's fine, but what if you are a violinist living in the zone of the plumbing school. Or vice versa.

Yes, we are now zoned to a  vocationally based R-12 which I gather from asking around has a  bad reputation, and according to the website mentioned earlier is one of the worst ranking in the state.  (although they have a new principal so I do understand things can change).

Edited by WannabeMasterchef, 14 March 2019 - 06:16 PM.


#38 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 14 March 2019 - 07:36 AM

View PostExpelliarmus, on 13 March 2019 - 07:24 PM, said:

TL;DR there are lots of ways to access subjects and apply for specialist streams.

Edited personal info.

From your previous post I thought you said it was hard to get into put of zone schools in SA?
I suspect it will all change after 2022!

Edited by WannabeMasterchef, 14 March 2019 - 06:15 PM.


#39 Manicmum

Posted 19 March 2019 - 09:44 PM

View PostWannabeMasterchef, on 14 March 2019 - 07:36 AM, said:

Edited personal info.

From your previous post I thought you said it was hard to get into put of zone schools in SA?
I suspect it will all change after 2022!

Why?

#40 Expelliarmus

Posted 19 March 2019 - 10:46 PM

View PostWannabeMasterchef, on 14 March 2019 - 07:36 AM, said:

Edited personal info.

From your previous post I thought you said it was hard to get into put of zone schools in SA?
I suspect it will all change after 2022!
It is hard. There are still pathways and some are easier than others. You also need to be talented in the area to get in. My post was in relation to the 'violinist in the plumbing high school zone'. The violinist will not have too much trouble accessing a school with a music or performing arts stream. A regular kid who just doesn't want to go to Charles Campbell* and doesn't succeed in a specialist stream will not find it easy to simply 'get into' Norwood Morialta*. It is difficult on the regular application form to get into an out of zone school.

I think it will get even harder in 2022 when Year 7s are moved into high schools.

*Schools chosen as examples




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