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Electric Cars - where are things at in Australia?


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#1 Literary Lemur

Posted 12 March 2019 - 06:39 PM

In Australia are we making much progress in moving from petrol to electric cars.

What percentage of car sales in Australians are now electric?

Are they becoming more affordable?

How far away are we from having sufficient recharging stations?

#2 kimasa

Posted 12 March 2019 - 06:51 PM

The only charging station I have ever seen is in Chadstone Shopping Centre, but they have an actual Tesla dealership inside an indoor shopping centre which just looks stupid.

#3 nup

Posted 12 March 2019 - 07:07 PM

I read the other day that there are 30. Teslar cars in Qld. Not sure how accurate it was but I thought they were more popular there. Hybrid cars are more popular.

#4 Literary Lemur

Posted 12 March 2019 - 07:19 PM

So would most people driving hybrid cars be able to run it almost exclusively on electricity or are the batteries not large enough?

#5 Fresh Start

Posted 12 March 2019 - 07:25 PM

View Postkimasa, on 12 March 2019 - 06:51 PM, said:

The only charging station I have ever seen is in Chadstone Shopping Centre, but they have an actual Tesla dealership inside an indoor shopping centre which just looks stupid.

We have a Tesla branded charging station with 4 or 5 spots in a “homemaker” shopping centre in our town. The funny part is it’s in the poorest part of town rather than being near the pricier parts. It is relatively close to the freeway though so maybe that’s why.

I also noticed at the weekend that the shopping centre across from the homemaker centre now has two EV car parks near Coles.

#6 TheGreenSheep

Posted 12 March 2019 - 07:25 PM

‘Currently, there are 4000 such vehicles on the road, making up just 0.1 per cent of new vehicle sales.’

‘16 electric vehicle models on sale in Australia, 13 are over $60,000’

From here, https://www.smh.com....112-h0hazy.html

#7 Coffeegirl

Posted 12 March 2019 - 07:25 PM

BMW have installed 3-4 charging stations on our local Westfield.    Never seen anyone use them.

DH was keen on the Tesla after driving one in the US, but the cost here plus lack of charging stations put us off.  At the time there was one between Sydney and Canberra

Now there’s heaps https://www.drivezer...g-stations/#all



#8 Ozquoll

Posted 12 March 2019 - 08:04 PM

Can’t multi-quote on my phone, but this article is pertinent to both GreenSheep and Coffeegirl’s posts:
https://www.google.c...ngine-71326/amp
^^^
BMW board member and Head of R & D reckons electric cars will never be as affordable as IC cars. They can never become widespread unless they are cost-competitive with lower-range IC cars. Which they never will be. I don’t expect e-cars will replace petrol-powered cars, and I’d be very surprised if e-cars ever make up even 10% of the cars in Australia.

#9 ABabyPlease

Posted 12 March 2019 - 08:32 PM

I think most electricity in Australia comes from burning coal. So until this changes, I'm not sure if electric cars are a better option in Australia.

#10 Literary Lemur

Posted 12 March 2019 - 09:30 PM

View PostABabyPlease, on 12 March 2019 - 08:32 PM, said:

I think most electricity in Australia comes from burning coal. So until this changes, I'm not sure if electric cars are a better option in Australia.

Couldn't solar panels recharge the battery (and work as backup electricity?).

#11 Caribou

Posted 12 March 2019 - 10:18 PM

DH has an electric car! We did Sydney to Melbourne not too long ago.

Basically, NRMA has loads of chargers. So does Tesla. Even Alice Springs has a charger! These far fast chargers.

So many hotels/motels/bnbs now have chargers installed. We used a lot of them

We charge our car entirely off solar at home. That takes about 4 hours to fully charge.

Basically you just need a wall socket plug. This is the slowest form of charging, hence 4 hours.

Fast chargers are about 30 mins to charge. We usually take this opportunity to get coffee and loo break.

Queensland already has a supercharger highway
Thanks to NRMA and government.

Electric cars. They’re expensive, Nissian leaf is about 50k. Hyandui has similar. Tesla is most expensive at 90-200k depending what you get. Second hand Tesla’s are really good, go for the ones sold by Tesla itself. They do it up well and fix problems and include a warranty. There’s BMW i3 which is also a great car. You can get that for about 60k for a demo model.  

New Tesla’s charge for using superchargers. This is to combat people leaving cars at charging stations and not coming back when charge was done.

NRMA is free, but not for long. They will soon charge once more mainstream.

Tesla battery has a 10-20 year life before needing to be replaced. 5k to replace those batteries.

Nissian battery has a 5 year ish life before needing replacement. It’s 5k to replace batteries in Nissian leaf as well.

Upside, my fuel cost is $0. (Because we picked up a second hand Tesla with the free charging attached to it) Though car was expensive it’s paid itself out with efficiently and no fuel costs. The drive to Melbourne and back to Sydney was a big test to us, but we never got low on charge. Only had to stop at Goulburn, Albury and one other place before arriving in Richmond Melbourne. And we’d have stopped on the way bc of the kids.

I think Australia is very ready for EVs. Our next trip is up to Brisbane.

Edited by Caribou, 12 March 2019 - 10:21 PM.


#12 FatherofFour

Posted 12 March 2019 - 10:24 PM

Look at the new energy vehicle requirements China has set. This will drive growth.

Battery capacity will increase while the cost will go down.

It will always be more difficult in Australia due to the distances we travel.

#13 Literary Lemur

Posted 12 March 2019 - 10:25 PM

Thanks for sharing Caribou.

#14 (feral)epg

Posted 12 March 2019 - 10:37 PM

View PostFatherofFour, on 12 March 2019 - 10:24 PM, said:

Look at the new energy vehicle requirements China has set. This will drive growth.

Battery capacity will increase while the cost will go down.

It will always be more difficult in Australia due to the distances we travel.

I think they actually make MORE sense in rural and remote areas.  Petrol is bl**@y expensive to transport, while electricity can be provided almost for free (once you set up the solar panels and battery storage) in so much of Australia.

#15 FatherofFour

Posted 12 March 2019 - 11:38 PM

View Post(feral)epg, on 12 March 2019 - 10:37 PM, said:

I think they actually make MORE sense in rural and remote areas.  Petrol is bl**@y expensive to transport, while electricity can be provided almost for free (once you set up the solar panels and battery storage) in so much of Australia.

Yes, agree - but I was thinking more of the current range that a battery provides and the constraints that brings to long distance remote rural travel.

ie the current average range of a EV is about 450 km so you would have to ensure a charging station is available at appropriate intervals on your trip - ie Adelaide - Horsham - Melbourne.

If you are crossing the Nullarbor or heading up central Australia ....?

#16 Literary Lemur

Posted 13 March 2019 - 07:46 AM

Is the technology currently in place to use the car battery to power your home of feed into the grid?

I rarely use my car. If i get an electric car could I  recharge it using my solar panels and if the car is not needed for a longer trip use the battery to power my home after then sun goes down or feed back into the grid?

#17 kadoodle

Posted 13 March 2019 - 08:40 AM

View PostFatherofFour, on 12 March 2019 - 11:38 PM, said:



Yes, agree - but I was thinking more of the current range that a battery provides and the constraints that brings to long distance remote rural travel.

ie the current average range of a EV is about 450 km so you would have to ensure a charging station is available at appropriate intervals on your trip - ie Adelaide - Horsham - Melbourne.

If you are crossing the Nullarbor or heading up central Australia ....?

Batteries are always the big cost, weak link and what’s off putting to potential buyers.

I’d love an electric car, but don’t want to shell out $5k every few years.

#18 Kavity1

Posted 13 March 2019 - 08:54 AM

Not only do the batteries have a limited life, but the damage to the environment making them is horrendous, but that tends to be glossed over

#19 Romeo Void

Posted 13 March 2019 - 09:13 AM

Cost is what puts me off. If a model around $30,000 was introduced then our next car would be electric for sure.

Edited by Romeo Void, 13 March 2019 - 09:13 AM.


#20 SynchronouslyIdle

Posted 13 March 2019 - 09:17 AM

I think EV manufacturers are well aware of the need to manage the batteries from an environmental impact perspective. The longevity of the batteries will improve as the technology evolves and if they can't recycle the materials they may repurpose the batteries for another use.

#21 seayork2002

Posted 13 March 2019 - 09:31 AM

We hired a car in Brisbane (through goget) it was a Corolla Hybrid.

We had never been in one before and we had it for three days, we had to go to the petrol station to put unleaded in it

Other than that I have no idea of the details on how it ran or what benefit it was to exist ie how it is better for the environment.

If it is great when we buy a car we might get one but we need to know a lot more about each option first

#22 ~J_WTF~

Posted 13 March 2019 - 09:31 AM

View PostFatherofFour, on 12 March 2019 - 11:38 PM, said:



Yes, agree - but I was thinking more of the current range that a battery provides and the constraints that brings to long distance remote rural travel.

ie the current average range of a EV is about 450 km so you would have to ensure a charging station is available at appropriate intervals on your trip - ie Adelaide - Horsham - Melbourne.

If you are crossing the Nullarbor or heading up central Australia ....?

This is my issue, we often go into remote areas where there is nothing because we like that kind of adventure. Plus I need it to be a capable 4wd, that I can fix if needed while out adventuring.

We could drive 1000km stretches on some journeys with a couple of 10 min toilet stops and driver changes.

My car easily does 1000-1200km (depends on the load and type of driving) on a single tank.

Having to make sure we could charge the car and allow the extra time to do it, doesn’t appeal.

Edited by ~J_F~, 13 March 2019 - 09:33 AM.


#23 Caitlin Happymeal

Posted 13 March 2019 - 09:39 AM

Seayork i have a corolla hybrid and i get about 700kms on a tank. So whilst i'm not sure about the emissions, i'm sure it takes less fossil fuel than my husbands same size kia. Actually about twice as efficient!

However i also understand the batteries are an ethical dilema, once unusable they arent exactly biodegradable...

It's a tricky problem. I love it for its cost saving but i'm not sure it's as environmentally friendly as people think.

#24 blimkybill

Posted 13 March 2019 - 10:09 AM

View Post~J_F~, on 13 March 2019 - 09:31 AM, said:

This is my issue, we often go into remote areas where there is nothing because we like that kind of adventure. Plus I need it to be a capable 4wd, that I can fix if needed while out adventuring.

We could drive 1000km stretches on some journeys with a couple of 10 min toilet stops and driver changes.

My car easily does 1000-1200km (depends on the load and type of driving) on a single tank.

Having to make sure we could charge the car and allow the extra time to do it, doesn’t appeal.
I don't think you are the target market.
Most people only drive on ordinary roads and certainly don't expect to do 1000 km at a time. I think charging stations every couple of hundred km along major highways are easy to provide and will meet the needs of many travellers. Plus charge at home when you are only driving close to home.
As others have said the cost, especially of batteries, is the big hurdle.  
I think the target marker will be to replace smaller cars, not big 4WDs.

#25 TheGreenSheep

Posted 13 March 2019 - 10:10 AM

View Post~J_F~, on 13 March 2019 - 09:31 AM, said:

This is my issue, we often go into remote areas where there is nothing because we like that kind of adventure. Plus I need it to be a capable 4wd, that I can fix if needed while out adventuring.

We could drive 1000km stretches on some journeys with a couple of 10 min toilet stops and driver changes.

My car easily does 1000-1200km (depends on the load and type of driving) on a single tank.

Having to make sure we could charge the car and allow the extra time to do it, doesn’t appeal.

Same same. We do massive road trips, think Perth to Sydney. No ways am I stopping for charging, that ould push me over the edge. When we do long hauls we get in and go. Kids are well versed in the get out, swap drivers and run around the car, toilet, back in and we are gone. Places we go doesn't have charging stations or mobile reception. No thanks!

It certainly is the size and breadth of Australia that limits the uptake of electric. Battery pollution and environmental damage is enormous.

Listening to ABC talkback on one trip and the discussion was very much on electric cars and the issues facing consumers. The panel raised a good point, that the taxes on petrol/diesel/gas is used to pay for roads. Where will that money come from?




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