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Ok to attend wedding ceremony only if not invited?


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#201 Odd-1-Out

Posted 29 March 2019 - 09:11 PM

OP did you end up asking them?

#202 Black Velvet

Posted 29 March 2019 - 09:58 PM

View PostBilly Shears, on 29 March 2019 - 09:04 PM, said:

Italian also, and while some parts ring true, my experience growing up was quite different. Ceremony was always at a (Catholic) Church and like others have mentioned, anyone was welcome.  If you were not particularly close to the couple, but still invited to the reception, you could even get away with wearing nice "Sunday best" to the church and save the formal wear for the night.  
I remember my parents being invited to weddings where Dad would say he didn't even know the couple, but the parents were 'paesani' from Italy so that was important enough to be invited.  Mum and Dad always went to both Mass and reception.  We were never invited as kids to our cousins' weddings until we were about 13/14.  Not sure if it was our family or maybe it's a regional thing? My family were from the north.
Yeah of course (Catholic) Church (was there ever another option? lol)

Yeah, I don't know may be a regional thing. We're from the South.

I definitely know the invite always included kids. No exceptions. Always the invite was Mr and Mrs X and family.(Don't want screaming newborns and runaway toddlers at your wedding? Too bad :laugh: )

And I get you on the paesani thing. I had so many people attend my wedding and I was thinking "who are all these people?"

I remember on my wedding day that in comparison to the ceremony, there were just so many more people at the reception as was quite normal and expected. But apparently one of my bridesmaid was shocked and expected the reception to be a low key affair based on the numbers in attendance at the ceremony. Yeah, nah. :rofl:

But again, it seems what some consider rude is perfectly normal practice for others. (I also think things are definitely changing with the times as is to be expected. A  wishing well would have caused a conniption when I was married "Madonna, you can't ask for money! So rude! :omg: )

#203 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 01 April 2019 - 09:13 PM

View PostBilly Shears, on 29 March 2019 - 09:09 PM, said:

Yep! We attended friend's wedding in India and it started two hours late.  No one seemed to mind.  The venue started serving food before the ceremony was even over and people walked over and started eating!
For the several indian weddings I have attended (hindu), that's pretty standard. Chatting and socialising at the back of the venue while the ceremony was taking place was fairly common and the food came out in waves (yummy!). None of the ceremonies I attended stuck to a set schedule, it happened as it happened,  give or take an hour or two along the way.

#204 Babetty

Posted 02 April 2019 - 04:32 PM

View PostYodaTheWrinkledOne, on 01 April 2019 - 09:13 PM, said:

Chatting and socialising at the back of the venue while the ceremony was taking place was fairly common

My DH and I went to a mosque for a friend's wedding - Indian background. As the women were separated at the back, and there was so much chatting and socialising, I hardly realised when the ceremony was underway!

#205 harryhoo

Posted 02 April 2019 - 06:57 PM

I would just ask the couple. My mum and dad came to my BIL's wedding uninvited. DH was a groomsman and DD was 2 weeks old and I was doing a reading, so I needed someone to chase 3 year old DS who was a page boy.
They were fine with it, which I thought they would be, but still thought it polite to check.




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