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Do you let your child eat may contain traces


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#1 new beginning

Posted 07 April 2019 - 09:04 PM

Hi,
We have seen 2 different allergists since my son was diagnosed with a peanut allergy roughly 7 years ago. First allergist who we saw  for 4 years said if my son could tollerate may contain traces of peanuts and never had a reaction to keep doing it.  So far so good . For the past 3 years we have seen a different allergist and she thinks that we shouldn’t be doing this . Just wondering if any other parents do may contain traces? If it says may contain peanuts then we don’t have it in the house .
Thank you

Edited by new beginning, 07 April 2019 - 10:06 PM.


#2 Riotproof

Posted 07 April 2019 - 09:08 PM

You’re going to need to ask her why.

We do traces. Namely because ds’s allergies would make it too restrictive if we didn’t. I am cautious about it though. I don’t generally allow mainstream chocolate because I feel like the risk of traces is higher. Ds had some vegan ice cream from a company that also makes cows milk ice cream. He had tingling, so I will not do that again. Ds is fine with some brands of muesli bars and not with others.

#3 amaza

Posted 07 April 2019 - 09:12 PM

We allow it because when DS was first diagnosed our allergist told us to and said it would be way too restrictive not to.

He hasn't had a reaction at all since first diagnosed 10 years ago (except for the challenge test) but is still showing very strong positives to skin prick and blood tests for most nuts so we assume he is still allergic and carry the epipen.

We have a challenge for sesame coming up soon and are very careful in relation to that and where we buy breads etc so it will be interesting to see how that goes.

#4 Crazyhouseholdof6

Posted 07 April 2019 - 09:14 PM

I follow this rule myself so I would for my kids too I think. Being coeliac if there’s a ‘may contain traces of wheat’ or anything similar I don’t even try it.
It’s not worth the risk to me.

#5 Riotproof

Posted 07 April 2019 - 09:17 PM

View PostCrazyhouseholdof6, on 07 April 2019 - 09:14 PM, said:

I follow this rule myself so I would for my kids too I think. Being coeliac if there’s a ‘may contain traces of wheat’ or anything similar I don’t even try it.
It’s not worth the risk to me.

That’s different from a food allergy though.

#6 Crazyhouseholdof6

Posted 07 April 2019 - 09:23 PM

It is different to a life threatening allergy but symptoms can be severe mimicking an allergy for some sufferers. No epi pens or anything like that but if the side effects of any allergy can be avoided why wouldn’t you do everything you could to reduce the risk?

#7 Riotproof

Posted 07 April 2019 - 09:25 PM

View PostCrazyhouseholdof6, on 07 April 2019 - 09:23 PM, said:

It is different to a life threatening allergy but symptoms can be severe mimicking an allergy for some sufferers. No epi pens or anything like that but if the side effects of any allergy can be avoided why wouldn’t you do everything you could to reduce the risk?

Because if you tolerate it, then you can help yourself outgrow it.

#8 Crazyhouseholdof6

Posted 07 April 2019 - 09:33 PM

Potentially outgrow it, I wouldn’t be risking / testing it unless it was under medical supervision in a hospital setting. My nephew is allergic to nuts, told to avoid at all costs but as he gets older they will do the tests to see if he outgrows it in a medically supervised setting in case of a reaction and they can administer medication.
If poster has been doing it great for them, I personally wouldn’t take the risk with my kids. I’ve seen too many reactions to a ‘one off ingestion’.
So for me no, I still wouldn’t risk it if it said ‘may contain’.

#9 Riotproof

Posted 07 April 2019 - 09:37 PM

View PostCrazyhouseholdof6, on 07 April 2019 - 09:33 PM, said:

Potentially outgrow it, I wouldn’t be risking / testing it unless it was under medical supervision in a hospital setting. My nephew is allergic to nuts, told to avoid at all costs but as he gets older they will do the tests to see if he outgrows it in a medically supervised setting in case of a reaction and they can administer medication.
If poster has been doing it great for them, I personally wouldn’t take the risk with my kids. I’ve seen too many reactions to a ‘one off ingestion’.
So for me no, I still wouldn’t risk it if it said ‘may contain’.

Terrific. It ultimately does come down to the patient, the allergist and their advice. Which is why I said the op needs to understand her new allergists reasoning.

May contain is not a one off ingestion.

#10 new beginning

Posted 07 April 2019 - 10:05 PM

Thanks everyone  - next appointment I will be definitely asking  why the different views on may contain traces . I did mention to  her  that our old allergist said it was ok. We haven’t had a skin prick test since seeing the second allergist (public) but will have one this year.

Edited by new beginning, 07 April 2019 - 10:07 PM.


#11 ali-song

Posted 07 April 2019 - 10:16 PM

View PostCrazyhouseholdof6, on 07 April 2019 - 09:23 PM, said:

It is different to a life threatening allergy but symptoms can be severe mimicking an allergy for some sufferers. No epi pens or anything like that but if the side effects of any allergy can be avoided why wouldn’t you do everything you could to reduce the risk?

DS is allergic to peanuts and some other legumes. Generally not anaphylactic, though. We’ve never been fussed about ‘may contain traces of’, and he’s never had a reaction to a food in that category (and he reacts to very small amounts of peanut). We recently saw an allergist at the RCH, who agreed with our approach. I may feel differently if DS had multiple anaphylactic reactions, but for us, living as normal a life as possible wins out over the very small possibility of a reaction. DS’s level of food-related anxiety (typically very high in peanut allergic kids) is something I’m actively trying to reduce as much as possible.

Ultimately, every family/individual has to decide what they’re comfortable with.

#12 ipsee

Posted 07 April 2019 - 10:17 PM

We do, because nearly everything says 'may contain traces of nuts'. I had a packet of lemonade icypoles that said 'may contain traces or pieces of nuts'.

#13 Prancer is coming

Posted 07 April 2019 - 10:18 PM

With my children of with an allergy, we do may contain traces.  The allergy paed told us to do this.

With my coeliacs child, she does not have traces.  The gastro and dietician told us to do this.  There is a certain brand that is the exception, our dietician knew the manager and was of the opinion that it was only on there as a general thing rather than it being an actual risk, if that makes sense.

Edited to remove brand in case people think I am telling them this brand is ok.

Edited by Prancer is coming, 10 April 2019 - 12:52 PM.


#14 Hellbent

Posted 07 April 2019 - 10:31 PM

We have never done may contain traces, on advice if allergist (egg allergy). 17 years on and on the odd occasion we/she slips up, there have been some reactions.

#15 daisychaon

Posted 07 April 2019 - 10:37 PM

Is it possible the allergist thinks it might delay the development of tolerance?

#16 born.a.girl

Posted 08 April 2019 - 04:54 AM

View PostPrancer is coming, on 07 April 2019 - 10:18 PM, said:

With my children of with an allergy, we do may contain traces.  The allergy paed told us to do this.

With my coeliacs child, she does not have traces.  The gastro and dietician told us to do this.  Cadbury’s is the exception, our dietician knew the manager and was of the opinion that it was only on there as a general thing rather than it being an actual risk, if that makes sense.



That's true, and any reputable manufacturer whose factory is not certified gluten free should have it.  I was a speciality food wholesaler for 25 years, and there was a lot of discussion about the 'may contain traces of ...'. Soooo many mostly small manufacturers at that stage (well over a decade ago) did not state this on their packaging, despite the fact that their factory also stored and produced the allergens.

One of my manufacturers did put it on the label.  I had a small country shop call me, apoplectic that our gluten free biscuits 'may contain traces ...'.  I replied that unless every other item in the shop was made in one of only two (at that stage) certified gluten free factories then they may well contain traces of allergens.  No one can guarantee it with the best care, and some people simply can't take the risk.


To clean down machinery before making gluten free products took them about four times as long as it would take to just change other product lines - there was a schedule of which things were made first and last.   These were manufacturers who employed a handful of people, not large factories where they can have a separate production line.


Truth is many coeliacs, and those with severe allergies, wouldn't trust something without knowing exactly what the risk was.  The rest of the market for gluten free was those who felt dramatically better reducing gluten, those for whom a potential trace was unlikely to be life threatening, and bonus for us, the trendies who thought skipping gluten had 'health' benefits even though they had no issues.

ETA: I missed a sentence.

Edited by born.a.girl, 08 April 2019 - 05:07 AM.


#17 Wonderstruck

Posted 08 April 2019 - 06:43 AM

View PostRiotproof, on 07 April 2019 - 09:08 PM, said:

You’re going to need to ask her why.

We do traces. Namely because ds’s allergies would make it too restrictive if we didn’t. I am cautious about it though. I don’t generally allow mainstream chocolate because I feel like the risk of traces is higher. Ds had some vegan ice cream from a company that also makes cows milk ice cream. He had tingling, so I will not do that again. Ds is fine with some brands of muesli bars and not with others.

This

we have a non-ige allergy so have no concerns with traces. But my reading of a lot of allergy material suggested that it is better to speak to manufacturers and gauge the risk than just rule out all may contains as the statements are not consistent or regulated so for one product they might just say it to cover themselves just in case with no specific reason. Others might do it as they process the allergen  in another area of the factory or same line before cleaning.

We avoid dairy or soy and are slowly outgrowing our allergy. Most packaged things said 'may contain dairy and soy' would have been hard to find things she could eat.

In essence it is best if you confirm with your doctor why and what if you should be seeking. Our doctors didnt like unnecessary restricting an already restrictive diet so wanted to keep it as broad as safely possible.

Good luck

Edited by Wonderstruck, 08 April 2019 - 06:44 AM.


#18 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 08 April 2019 - 07:18 AM

DS1 has friends with multiple ANA allergies. I am always double checking with parent brand/specific item before giving (parent is happy for me to do this rather than send separate food). She does do items which are labeled “traces of” for as PP have mentioned it can be a legal catch all.

Ironically it has been items not labeled “traces of” that friend has had reactions to (not in my presence but within his own home).

#19 Mmmcheese

Posted 08 April 2019 - 08:22 AM

We do eat 'may contain traces' . Her allergist said to, otherwise it rules out too much food.

#20 wallofdodo

Posted 08 April 2019 - 08:47 AM

I have coeliac disease so I acknowledged that it is a bit different. This is a question that I have been thinking a lot lately.

I was diagnosed over 10 years ago, so labeling and availability has changed a lot over that time. I saw a dietitian at that time, and it was suggested that if you keep the home totally GF, then you can risk the 'may contain' or 'processed on equipment', if you wanted to, as the contamination is likely to be small.

I have recently joined a page on Facebook for coeliacs and the majority of people do not eat, may contain traces... food, even if GF by ingredient.

I don't want to limit myself, but then there is more available at this point in time, so I am not really limiting myself. hmm, some thinking to do.

At this point, it is just me in my family who is diagnosed, if it were my children as well, I might think differently.

#21 babybug15

Posted 08 April 2019 - 09:15 AM

I do- with the exception of the particular brand of museli bars where I've had a reaction to one of their products despite it (in theory) not containing my allergen. Other products they produce do, so I assume they don't clean between production runs.

Unless a factory is totally clear of that allergen they legally need to put it on the label, regardless of how much cleaning, how often it's used etc.

Interestingly when the labeling requirements came in a friend who has a severe nut allergy found alot of products they'd safely been consuming started having the "may contain" label. They continue to use them.

#22 Popper

Posted 08 April 2019 - 09:16 AM

We avoid traces of peanuts as DD suffers mild ANA from food with traces. Same with products manufactured in a facility also handling peanuts. It is not that hard to avoid once you get your head around it.

#23 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 08 April 2019 - 09:22 AM

We use “may contain traces” etc. but DS isn’t anaphylactic. He just throws up.

My brother once had a mild faction to a may contain traces muesli bar, name brand one too. So it can happen. It’s up to you to decide what is safe for your child.

#24 somila

Posted 08 April 2019 - 09:58 AM

My DS is now 19, so has to make calls like this for himself. He has multiple food allergies.

When he was growing up we avoided all foods with 'may contain nuts' statements on the advice of the paediatric allergists he saw.  

Sometimes I would call manufacturers to find out more about their procedures -- if it was just that ingredients were stored in the same room, that was less of a risk than being processed on the same line etc.

He still avoids 'may contain traces of peanuts' foods, as that allergy is still very strong according to skin prick tests.  A trace of egg is highly unlikely to lead to anaphylaxis, so that is a green light now.  Epipen is carried at all times obviously.

Ultimately it is a risk analysis you have to undertake.  For my child, I didn't want to risk a reaction, an epipen or a trip to the hospital for the sake of eating a wider variety of processed food. The anxiety would have been crippling for me apart from anything else.
Carried own food everywhere.  Educated food suppliers, caterers etc. Educated child.  Took some calculated risks on some occasions. Worked for us.

As a young adult he has to make that choice for himself.  So far only one random reaction, which was mild-moderate.  
He has oral allergy syndrome (itchy mouth) with bananas, and chose to eat those at a dinner party the other night but avoided the 'may contain traces' icecream.

#25 Schmig

Posted 08 April 2019 - 10:42 AM

I'm a little surprised by the number of coeliacs in here saying traces is probably ok. Our gastroenterologist and dietitian both clearly told us that traces of should not be eaten and a crumb is enough to cause an immune reaction and it can take the body up to 3 months to recover.

Although I understand that factories don't want to run the risk of people suing due to possible contamination issues and will label accordingly, cross contamination can have serious issues for coeliacs, particularly if it is a little on a regular basis. I personally wouldn't take the risk as not everyone feels physically sick when they consume gluten (based on the information our specialists have provided.) But it is obviously up to each person as to what they are comfortable for themselves.  I can only speak for what I am ok with for my child. EFS

Edited by Schmig, 08 April 2019 - 11:14 AM.





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