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Do you let your child eat may contain traces


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#26 Ellie bean

Posted 08 April 2019 - 11:39 PM

View PostSchmig, on 08 April 2019 - 10:42 AM, said:

I'm a little surprised by the number of coeliacs in here saying traces is probably ok. Our gastroenterologist and dietitian both clearly told us that traces of should not be eaten and a crumb is enough to cause an immune reaction and it can take the body up to 3 months to recover.

Although I understand that factories don't want to run the risk of people suing due to possible contamination issues and will label accordingly, cross contamination can have serious issues for coeliacs, particularly if it is a little on a regular basis. I personally wouldn't take the risk as not everyone feels physically sick when they consume gluten (based on the information our specialists have provided.) But it is obviously up to each person as to what they are comfortable for themselves.  I can only speak for what I am ok with for my child. EFS
But the bulk of people are saying traces are ok for allergies, not for coeliacs, which I understand are 2 completely different scenarios and not comparable?

#27 DaLittleEd

Posted 09 April 2019 - 12:37 AM

We avoid "may contain traces of" for our coeliacs child.

However I do think she is probably more likely to get glutened at school from the playdoh (she doesn't play with it but that stuff goes everywhere in the classroom) and stray crumbs than a lot of the "may contain traces of...." products.

#28 Riotproof

Posted 09 April 2019 - 12:45 AM

View PostDaLittleEd, on 09 April 2019 - 12:37 AM, said:

We avoid "may contain traces of" for our coeliacs child.

However I do think she is probably more likely to get glutened at school from the playdoh (she doesn't play with it but that stuff goes everywhere in the classroom) and stray crumbs than a lot of the "may contain traces of...." products.

Her classroom should have gluten free play dough. Have you ever brought it up?

#29 DaLittleEd

Posted 09 April 2019 - 12:55 AM

^^It probably should. But it seems a bit difficult as it is treated very differently to an anaphylactic allergy. Also a previous child at the school with coeliacs didn't have gf playdoh.

And she was only diagnosed just before starting school so it is a massive learning curve for me. No idea how to bring it up really, I should probably ask the specialist for advice (a letter or something) at next appointment. I could probably volunteer to make the playdoh.

And then of course they want to start doing cooking. I am not going to let her eat anything they make at school as risk of contamination is too high, but might let her join in the activity. Anyway, Urgh. I have nfi what I am doing at this stage tbh.

#30 Riotproof

Posted 09 April 2019 - 01:22 AM

It is not hard for them to make gluten free play dough. It is not hard to make baking inclusive for her.

#31 DaLittleEd

Posted 09 April 2019 - 01:34 AM

I will raise gf play dough for next term. Cooking though I would not be comfortable with, especially as it is a shared classroom - I wouldn't be confident that they could completely rule out cross contamination on utensils etc.

#32 SplashingRainbows

Posted 09 April 2019 - 05:29 AM

Hey DaLittleEd

You don’t need to make the GF play doh your problem to solve. You can just raise that it’s a risk for your less than school age child and could they please make GF play doh. There’s several recipes out there.

It’s funny as a long term coeliac with a CD child the play doh would bother me far more than the cooking. Is there anything we can help with in allowing her to participate in cooking?
Does your pre school / school have the coeliac society info sheets written for schools? I can probably get them to you if not.

Something like fried rice with the right soy sauce is kid friendly and pretty allergy safe if made with no nuts  or egg. Provided the utensils and wok were clean before starting I’d eat it myself (coeliac) ornament let my son have it.

That said if all the kiddos are making things with their hands then yeah it would be a no from me. I’m militant with my 2 at home but you just can’t be that thorough with 20-30 kids.

The staff would definitely cater for but or egg allergies. Your daughters needs aren’t different.

Of course don’t let me push you into doing something that’s uncomfortable for you- it’s quite possible you have some red flags due to lack of confidence / knowledge in the staff that I can’t see. And you definitely should take that into consideration.

#33 DaLittleEd

Posted 09 April 2019 - 10:01 AM

Thanks for all the advice. I will raise the play dough with school, it is a shared classroom though, but even if it is just for DDs class it will lower the risk.

I don't think I would be comfortable with the cooking though. I am just imagining 20 little pairs of grubby hands....

#34 2bundles

Posted 10 April 2019 - 06:03 AM

DS is ANA to nuts. He is fine with “may contain traces’. He did vomit once from chocolate gelato that had been made on the same machine as a nut gelato (we found that out after going back to ask).
It is a personal decision on risk.

#35 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 10 April 2019 - 06:44 AM

View Post2bundles, on 10 April 2019 - 06:03 AM, said:

DS is ANA to nuts. He is fine with “may contain traces’. He did vomit once from chocolate gelato that had been made on the same machine as a nut gelato (we found that out after going back to ask).
It is a personal decision on risk.

My son got sick from a soft serve from a Mr Whippy van. Cross contamination from the crushed peanuts they had as a topping option we believe. Must have been in the melted chocolate. We should have known better, but he has never had a reaction from other ice cream places, and they all generally offer nutty options.

#36 ali-song

Posted 10 April 2019 - 08:57 AM

View Post~LemonMyrtle~, on 10 April 2019 - 06:44 AM, said:



My son got sick from a soft serve from a Mr Whippy van. Cross contamination from the crushed peanuts they had as a topping option we believe. Must have been in the melted chocolate. We should have known better, but he has never had a reaction from other ice cream places, and they all generally offer nutty options.

We had the same experience - we probably should have known better! Mr Whippy vans are now off limits. As are dodgy Chinese restaurants and Cheesecake shop cakes with ‘almonds’.

#37 Popper

Posted 10 April 2019 - 11:21 AM

View Post~LemonMyrtle~, on 10 April 2019 - 06:44 AM, said:



My son got sick from a soft serve from a Mr Whippy van. Cross contamination from the crushed peanuts they had as a topping option we believe. Must have been in the melted chocolate. We should have known better, but he has never had a reaction from other ice cream places, and they all generally offer nutty options.

DD has welts, puffy eyes and sore throat (so mild ANA) from all Arnott's biscuits, ice cream/ice blocks with nut traces, etc. We would never even consider Mr Whippy an ok option! Makes me feel like DD is a severe sufferer with little chance of outgrowing her peanut allergy reading this thread where others are consuming traces with no consequence. 😥

#38 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 10 April 2019 - 12:09 PM

View PostPopper, on 10 April 2019 - 11:21 AM, said:



DD has welts, puffy eyes and sore throat (so mild ANA) from all Arnott's biscuits, ice cream/ice blocks with nut traces, etc. We would never even consider Mr Whippy an ok option! Makes me feel like DD is a severe sufferer with little chance of outgrowing her peanut allergy reading this thread where others are consuming traces with no consequence.

Sounds like your DD is very allergic! That sucks. My boss at work has a son that’s very allergic, he won’t even eat nuts while at work because they may still be on him when he gets home.

I’m very grateful my son is only mildly allergic. Even the Mr Whippy ice cream, he felt sick, vomited once. Then he was fine. It’s very manageable. We even can get Thai takeaway, which my brother would never do! (I love Thai food)

All our doctors have said that it’s very unlikely that kids will grow out of a peanut allergy.

#39 Prancer is coming

Posted 10 April 2019 - 12:50 PM

View PostSchmig, on 08 April 2019 - 10:42 AM, said:

I'm a little surprised by the number of coeliacs in here saying traces is probably ok. Our gastroenterologist and dietitian both clearly told us that traces of should not be eaten and a crumb is enough to cause an immune reaction and it can take the body up to 3 months to recover.

If you are referring to me, I allow food from one company on the advice of our dietician.  If the dietician thinks it is okay as she knows the manager of the company, I am fine with that.  Even if a factory is Allergy free, there is still the odd chance an employee may eat lunch with the allergy ingredient and somehow contaminate the product.  So a lot of company’s will put a warning on just in case, which is frustrating.  I have certainly had times both my allergy and coeliac kids have had exposure and I have no idea where from.  Our dietician is also big on ask questions around the food and if satisfied, eat it, not to isolate yourself and live in fear of food.  But obviously don’t eat it if you are not happy with the answers to your questions.




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