Jump to content

Backyard breeder, help needed


  • Please log in to reply
59 replies to this topic

#26 Little boys rock

Posted 22 April 2019 - 09:18 PM

Purebred poodles are the bees knees, we adore our little one. The best choice ever!

#27 StillDreaming

Posted 22 April 2019 - 09:29 PM

Can I jump in and ask if poodles do ok when their people work full time? I was looking at a labradoodle until I read this thread and now I feel awful for them... Feeling a bit naive so I want to do as much research as possible before committing to a dog.

The plan would be for my new dog to hang out with my mums dog during the day (ideally we’d get two from same litter and have them get used to each other right from the start). For at least three days a week though they’d be without humans from 8:30-5 ish.

They’d be very much indoor dogs at both places and  would get walks and lots of interaction when we’re home.
Sorry to jump in and change the topic a bit....

#28 Oriental lily

Posted 22 April 2019 - 09:34 PM

Here is a standard poodle .

Why anyone would buy a labradoodle or golden doodle or the new and improved cobber dog is beyond me !

What frustrates poodle owners is how often their poodles get misidentified as a mutt !

People seem to think poodles all have the shaved muzzle , long ears ect ect . Poodles can be fuzzy wuzzy fur balls as any trendy designer breed . It’s the poodle curls and wool that MAKE those mutts cute in the first place ! So why not get the original and best sourced from a registered breeder ?

Will mention not all oodles even inherit those gorgeous wool coats . Some end up with longer  stringy coat that moult like a bugger .

Attached Files



#29 kadoodle

Posted 22 April 2019 - 10:18 PM

They can get up to a humongous amount of mischief if left unsupervised; and two will get into five times as much mischief as a single puppy.

#30 Oriental lily

Posted 22 April 2019 - 10:28 PM

No decent breeder will ever sell two pups from the same litter together . Can cause all sorts of training and developmental problems if not handled correctly . Be a disaster if left alone together for that amount of time everyday .

Those hours it might be better to get a slightly older pup . Or organise doggy day care or something . A high energy high intelligent dog needs lots of attention and training very consistently .

#31 Ellie bean

Posted 23 April 2019 - 03:21 AM

View PostStillDreaming, on 22 April 2019 - 09:29 PM, said:

Can I jump in and ask if poodles do ok when their people work full time? I was looking at a labradoodle until I read this thread and now I feel awful for them... Feeling a bit naive so I want to do as much research as possible before committing to a dog.

The plan would be for my new dog to hang out with my mums dog during the day (ideally we’d get two from same litter and have them get used to each other right from the start). For at least three days a week though they’d be without humans from 8:30-5 ish.

They’d be very much indoor dogs at both places and  would get walks and lots of interaction when we’re home.
Sorry to jump in and change the topic a bit....
I think purebred poodles would cope just as well with those hours as most other breeds. I got 2 pups from different litters (not poodles though) when my ex and I were both working full time and they were fine, both lovely well adjusted dogs, I felt it was much better than leaving a single puppy alone, I know it’s not ideal but otherwise we wouldn’t have been able to get dogs (this was 15 years ago). I can’t see why an “oodle” would cope better with that than a poodle- but if I’m wrong I’m sure someone will comment!

If we ever get another pup I’m definitely planning a poodle

OP my parents just bought an oodle, despite being otherwise intelligent kind people, despite all the links I sent them- they are confident it’s parents are well treated even though they collected the puppy from a car boot in a coles car park- sometimes there’s just no telling people! I can tell from the photos it’s going to shed like anything too, it’s got more of a lab coat than anything



#32 born.a.girl

Posted 23 April 2019 - 05:09 AM

View Postkadoodle, on 22 April 2019 - 07:01 PM, said:

Is she willing to take on a rescue puppy? There’s quite a few former Christmas presents in shelters at this time of year.


Sadly for him, and fortunately for us, that's what we got in February several years ago, at 16 x weeks.   Took ages to toilet train him as he'd hide, and make sure we weren't looking when he did a pee inside, poor little boy.


They do get snapped up quickly though - I had all of the rescue pages open and refreshed them on the hour.  We called, and by the time we got in to the Lost Dogs Home they had their maximum two more people on the waiting list.  Most of them are bigger, and I have a dodgy shoulder which meant a lightweight was the only option.

#33 StillDreaming

Posted 23 April 2019 - 06:23 AM

View PostEllie bean, on 23 April 2019 - 03:21 AM, said:


I think purebred poodles would cope just as well with those hours as most other breeds. I got 2 pups from different litters (not poodles though) when my ex and I were both working full time and they were fine, both lovely well adjusted dogs, I felt it was much better than leaving a single puppy alone, I know it’s not ideal but otherwise we wouldn’t have been able to get dogs (this was 15 years ago). I can’t see why an “oodle” would cope better with that than a poodle- but if I’m wrong I’m sure someone will comment!

If we ever get another pup I’m definitely planning a poodle

OP my parents just bought an oodle, despite being otherwise intelligent kind people, despite all the links I sent them- they are confident it’s parents are well treated even though they collected the puppy from a car boot in a coles car park- sometimes there’s just no telling people! I can tell from the photos it’s going to shed like anything too, it’s got more of a lab coat than anything

Thanks. I didn’t think they’d cope differently to an ‘oodle’ I just thought I’d ask people about poodles because there seems to be a lot of knowledge in here about them.

#34 ~river song~

Posted 23 April 2019 - 06:59 AM

Would never buy an ‘oodle’ although I really wish my Cavalier King Charles did have the poodle coat so I’m not vacuuming his fur from everything in sight! The one pitfall of my fluff ball. He is the ultimate lap dog, a big sook, he was easy to toilet train and often my favourite person in the house

Attached Files



#35 IamtheMumma

Posted 23 April 2019 - 07:07 AM

View PostSpikey-on strike, on 22 April 2019 - 08:07 PM, said:

Quite a few litters available right now, or very shortly! I should not have looked at their puppy photos. Dying from an OD of cute.

Honey is just beautiful.

#36 ~Bob~

Posted 23 April 2019 - 07:27 AM

I was going to mention that 'oodles' get snapped up very quickly from rescue groups. Many people don't have the money for expensive puppies, so they wait for rescue dogs to come up. They are hard to get. Like it or not, there's a huge demand for 'oodles'.

Edited by ~Bob~, 23 April 2019 - 07:27 AM.


#37 José

Posted 23 April 2019 - 07:38 AM

View PostSpikey-on strike, on 22 April 2019 - 08:04 PM, said:



Well, the first thing that leaps out is that they claim it's a breed, the second, is that they are a small farm which means that as puppies are the 'produce' (like wool, or milk, or meat), then they would need to be intensively farmed to make a profit large enough to support the business.

Final thing, they claim multigenerational, which is not particularly concerning - except the coats and colours are not breeding true.

So no, I wouldn't be recommending a puppy mill, even one with a cutesie webpage.

no, i dont want to recommend a puupy mill! is it fair though to label them a puppy mill? i dont know, genuine question? youre saying its a problem if the farm is small? so i should be looking for a large producer of animals? does that work? if they are producing many how can i be sure they are approrpiately caring for the animals and their needs?


what do you mean the coats and colours are not breeding true?
obviously, there is no tone in text communications. these are all genuine questions, im interested in the answers!

#38 SummerStar

Posted 23 April 2019 - 07:47 AM

View Post~Bob~, on 23 April 2019 - 07:27 AM, said:

I was going to mention that 'oodles' get snapped up very quickly from rescue groups. Many people don't have the money for expensive puppies, so they wait for rescue dogs to come up. They are hard to get. Like it or not, there's a huge demand for 'oodles'.

There is a huge demand for them unfortunately. I've never worked out why. But that's why they're so profitable for puppy farms and BYB. They can churn them out then charge $3000-6000 for them to gullible people who believe the spiel about them being free of health issue and the perfect dog.

There needs to be laws to make it harder and stop it. Because educating people about what they're supporting doesn't seem to help....

#39 Caitlin Happymeal

Posted 23 April 2019 - 07:55 AM

My oodle is amazing. As a PP suggested, shes that awesome mix of *shock* mini poodle x mini poodle.

She cost about as much as BYB charge for a cross bred mutt - cheaper than many, actually, under 3K.

She looks like a beautiful black teddy bear when shes due for a clip and the only reasons we are clipping her as short as we are is so that a) people dont mistake her for a cross breed (im sort of loving her poofy poodle tail clip whereas i swore i wouldnt clip her like a poodle) and b) to get her used to clipping.

OP if your friend is in QLD there's a few breeders ive been in touch with who I can recommend from that list on dogzonline. I also randomly met the tassie breeder on the plane to tassie last year hehe and based on our three hour conversation, would suggest they are also very good people.

So hard - ive been in your position sort of, a friend bought a cavoodle (not a rescue) about a year before we got our baby and I'm glad she wasnt a massively close friend because I must admit, it colored my view of her - I did gently try to educate but to no avail. We were also recommended a cavoodle by my girls therapist in order to train as a therapy dog. Whilst her pup is AMAZING, I did explain politely that I wasnt taking the risk of getting the cav coat and left it at that.

I'm sure there'll be criticism of me getting anything bred and not a rescue and thats fine too - my pup was brought into our family for a reason and that is to train as an assistance dog. It needed to have certain traits. Both our cats are RSPCA/AWL babies and if I was getting a dog purely as a pet, a rescue would have been the go.

#40 Appleaday

Posted 23 April 2019 - 08:00 AM

I have an 8 week old toy poodle pup and he is such a good dog. He is my 3rd poodle. I tried another breed, a Golden Retriever but he was an outdoor dog and too active for us so I rehomed him to a lady who loved Retrievers and already had one. He is now very happy.

I don't get the oodle crosses when poodles are such great dogs. I think people might think they are high strung and yappy but that's usually when they aren't walked or socialised.

#41 Romeo Void

Posted 23 April 2019 - 08:12 AM

Thanks for the poodle photo's, I've been bombarding her :clap:

#42 *Spikey*

Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:05 AM

View PostJosé, on 23 April 2019 - 07:38 AM, said:

no, i dont want to recommend a puupy mill! is it fair though to label them a puppy mill? i dont know, genuine question? youre saying its a problem if the farm is small? so i should be looking for a large producer of animals? does that work? if they are producing many how can i be sure they are approrpiately caring for the animals and their needs?


what do you mean the coats and colours are not breeding true?
obviously, there is no tone in text communications. these are all genuine questions, im interested in the answers!

Yes, it's fair to label them a puppy mill as their business plan is to pump out pups for profit. That's what the 'mill' means. Churning through dogs until they're no longer of use because you need to make maximum profit from your stock to earn a living. Ever thought about what happens to the breeding stock that can no longer breed? A regular breeder might have five breeding dogs - which is a houseful when it comes to 'retired' dogs. Some get rehomed when they retire suitably young. But that doesn't happen with these dogs. So what do you do with 20+ b**ches that can't produce puppies any more, and might live for another 5-7 years? Assume you can rehome some, and dump some at the pound. But that's a big volume of older dogs to move. So you cull them - like you would other types of livestock. So no, don't look for a larger producer - the same problems are there and amplified.

So if you really wanted to buy from this kind of organisation, and you aren't terribly fussed about dogs as livestock, then the next question you need to look at is disease.  You need to identify the common health problems of all of the breeds involved, and then check that the pup you intend to buy is not suffering from them. They claim their pups are healthy - what does that mean? Flea treatment, worming, vaccination? What about degenerative eye diseases? They were common in poodles a while back. The purebred people have been breeding to eliminate this from their gene pool. The oodle breeders don't need to, because once the dog is yours, it's your problem (this problem doesn't show up in puppies, its adult dogs who suffer). You need genetic testing of your pup (not it's alleged parents) to see what it carries. You also need to do it yourself, because there have been cases of fraud - fake genetic and dysplasia testing results. No surprises there. Hips and elbows - which need to be from the parents, and you won't be able to guarantee what you are told is the truth by the time you see the puppy in its 'home' on the farm.

Short answer, you cannot guarantee it. Short of gaining access to the entirety of their farm and their financials - and even then, you would need to surprise visit. Oodle farmers have now worked out they need to mimic the AKC (that they are not able to join) in order to convince people about their reputability. So they've created Associations, that might look like a governing Canine Council. It's simply another marketing strategy, and those Associations do nothing to control the breeders, they do however, provide a platform for additional marketing strategies.

There are no 'good' oodle farmers. They're peddling a lie, and they're peddling it at the expense of your pocket and dog health. No matter how slick their promotional material is.

Also, visit Oscars Law.

#43 kadoodle

Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:08 AM

View Post~Bob~, on 23 April 2019 - 07:27 AM, said:

I was going to mention that 'oodles' get snapped up very quickly from rescue groups. Many people don't have the money for expensive puppies, so they wait for rescue dogs to come up. They are hard to get. Like it or not, there's a huge demand for 'oodles'.

I fostered an ex BYB breeding dog who popped out three “koodles” (kelpie x poodle). Very cute, and the rescue group had no problem finding owners for them; but a herding dog crossed with a hunting dog? That’s just asking for trouble. Not to mention that the mother wasn’t all kelpie, so who knows what the dad actually was.

#44 ~J_F~

Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:09 AM

View PostAppleaday, on 23 April 2019 - 08:00 AM, said:

I have an 8 week old toy poodle pup and he is such a good dog. He is my 3rd poodle. I tried another breed, a Golden Retriever but he was an outdoor dog and too active for us so I rehomed him to a lady who loved Retrievers and already had one. He is now very happy.

I don't get the oodle crosses when poodles are such great dogs. I think people might think they are high strung and yappy but that's usually when they aren't walked or socialised.

So you had 2 puppies of different breeds at the exact same time when you posted your thread about getting the wrong breed?

#45 Appleaday

Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:15 AM

View Post~J_WTF~, on 23 April 2019 - 09:09 AM, said:



So you had 2 puppies of different breeds at the exact same time when you posted your thread about getting the wrong breed?

No I didn't, but I am not going to derail the OP's thread.

#46 SummerStar

Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:19 AM

View Post~J_WTF~, on 23 April 2019 - 09:09 AM, said:



So you had 2 puppies of different breeds at the exact same time when you posted your thread about getting the wrong breed?

I was thinking it wasn't at the same time but sure found a new one quickly after offloading the last...

#47 ~J_F~

Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:21 AM

View PostSummerStar, on 23 April 2019 - 09:19 AM, said:



I was thinking it wasn't at the same time but sure found a new one quickly after offloading the last...

Seems so...

#48 Romeo Void

Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:39 AM

Well if there's one thing I can guarantee for this friend of mine is that whichever dog she does get it will be adored for life.  There will be no handing in of dogs that don't fit, I know her that much.  She's had several dogs, all rescues, and they made old bones and are cremated and sit on her mantle.  This desire for a small fluffy has come out of left field but I think she's been thinking of her mother lately and missing her. Her mother always carried a small fluffy.  I'm just trying to steer her away from the really awful puppy mills.  I've suggested she insist on coming to the home and meeting the puppies parents.  I've also suggested she make sure the parents aren't too closely related (I don't know how many oodles there are out there to cross breed with)

Edited by Romeo Void, 23 April 2019 - 09:39 AM.


#49 Appleaday

Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:58 AM

View Post~J_WTF~, on 23 April 2019 - 09:21 AM, said:



Seems so...

Wow just wow he wasn't right for us but would you prefer me to keep a dog that was unhappy? I didn't just offload him I actually turned down a home for him that was unsuitable and found him a great home. I get updated with pics by text message and the new owner is able to keep up with a very active breed, having had the experience that I didn't have to deal with him. She was actually on the waitlist with the breeder for a pup so is extremely happy with him.

Don't know why I am justifying this but I forgot it's EB land where rehoming a dog (for it's own good) is considered cruel...

Anyway this is the OP's thread is about poodles and not buying from puppy mills so I think we should keep to the topic.

#50 ~J_F~

Posted 23 April 2019 - 10:01 AM

Look don’t have to explain anything, you do you but you rehomed a puppy a couple weeks ago and you have another pup already and you don’t see why that might raise some eyebrows....

Best of luck with the new puppy.

Edited by ~J_WTF~, 23 April 2019 - 10:08 AM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.