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Expulsion from school in zone?


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#51 Karlee99

Posted 18 June 2019 - 01:39 PM

View PostRuntotheRiver, on 18 June 2019 - 08:07 AM, said:

hey told us if your child is being physically hurt, that is assault and you can report it to the police.

I don't hold a lot of faith in that either. Our son was a recent victim of multiple physical assaults at school recently (attacker admitted he didn't know DS and picked him the first time cause he was alone - second and third time because he had gotten some form of punishment from school and it was in retaliation). When the school asked us to report it to the police they were pretty uninterested to be honest. I had to push them to even take some kind of record of it. It worries me for the kids that are doing the right thing and just going about getting an education

#52 Magnolia2

Posted 18 June 2019 - 03:00 PM

View PostRuntotheRiver, on 18 June 2019 - 08:07 AM, said:



Teachers are not allowed to touch children, even if your child is in a headlock and another child won't let go. They evacuate the class, so other's are not in the line of fire.


Is this true, across the board, in Australian schools? If so, it is all kinds of wrong. A school has a duty of care to its students, and to prevent a teacher from taking action in a case where very significant injury is actually occurring, is outrageous. Do schools have their own policies on when actual physical intervention is warranted? Surely they wouldn't let the child in the headlock just remain there, while everyone evacuated?

(Anecdata: we had a couple of very troubled kids at my primary school, three decades ago, but I remember them being physically peeled off students if they suddenly attacked others in class. (Horrible memories of a very large 11 yo boy picking up a giant tin rubbish bin from outside, running in to the class again and throwing it from close proximity towards a table of unsuspecting kids doing worksheets).... Suffice to say he was physically overpowered and removed from the room immediately so injuries could be dealt with and he couldn't do any more damage.)

#53 frazzle

Posted 18 June 2019 - 03:58 PM

I remember a Sue Larkey talk where she ended up flattening and sitting on a student who was a runner on a train station and as she said, she preferred to fill in the paperwork later than risk this child leaping onto a moving train. Similar thing when a friend went to a talk about restraint that the commissioner said think about what you are going to say to the coroner if you didn't restrain/stop that child.
I guess the point is I am sure most (if not all) teachers have some knowledge of when to step in. They aren't omniscient, they can't be everywhere. However when they do step in they then have to be prepared for the copious paperwork, forms, questions, parents, social media attention etc. Look at the two recent cases of the princpal and deputy (both who got trial by social and public media and were hounded even though the majority of the school parents wanted them back).
From my perspective I have given my kid's teacher full permission to deck her if she has to (I trust her teacher's judgement) and will help her fill in the paperwork. She has multiple disabilities and behaviour issues and yes she is in in a mainstream school (now) - don't get me started on the 'unit' she was in previously - and yes we had some seriously hairy moments but everyone has come out the other side. But if it flared up again, I have no problems with the teacher manhandling my child out of a dangerous situation (as long as the teacher knew how to do it safely for everyone including themselves).
Maybe I am a rare parent when it comes to this - I hope not.

#54 frazzle

Posted 18 June 2019 - 04:18 PM

And just adding this in the context of months if not years of therapy, intervention in and out of school, medication, strategy meetings and constant battles with bureaucracy and government to get sufficient support for my child, the school and teacher ...

#55 Expelliarmus

Posted 18 June 2019 - 07:14 PM

Handling a child is not recommended. I place myself between students if I am able. I would t leave a student who was eg. in a headlock. I once stayed with a child to instruct them how to get away rather than remove the child myself as that would have escalated the situation and made it worse.

Until now there has only been one situation I have needed to try and remove a student. Most children respond to my verbal commands. In the situation I reached for the child I wasn’t the only teacher doing in and yes it was an attempted headlock.

I have heard a number of teachers talk about incidents where teachers have physically intervened so it does happen.

#56 Malkin Slinkhard

Posted 18 June 2019 - 07:25 PM

View PostMagnolia2, on 18 June 2019 - 03:00 PM, said:

Is this true, across the board, in Australian schools? If so, it is all kinds of wrong.

No. We can touch a student for justifiable educational reasons and to prevent harm, at least in the state I work. However I generally don’t jump into fights where I can avoid it - I teach high school and I’m not very big. Other teachers do though.

#57 EPZ

Posted 18 June 2019 - 08:01 PM

We had a physical repeat offender and my VIC school said they cannot legally touch the boy. Or maybe they didn’t want to? My DS talked his way out of it, after a while he let him go.

I gave them my working dog one day to calm him down, it worked so well, he completely changed, I wish they had working dogs in schools.

#58 eilca

Posted 19 June 2019 - 08:03 PM

In SA physical restraint must only occur if a student presents with immediate significant harm to self or others.  A physical assault on another student would not normally fall under this category for restraint.  A teacher may choose to intervene and try and prevent themselves and others from being hurt through disengagement strategies, but restraint is a last resort and during life threatening situations.

#59 Charli73

Posted 19 June 2019 - 08:40 PM

The old school my DS was at the principal used to bear hug him when he had a meltdown then take him to her office.. I wasn’t happy about it as he wasn’t learning how to self regulate at all then she asked us to find another school because.. so yes they do restrain.

#60 PrincessPeach

Posted 19 June 2019 - 09:14 PM

View PostMagnolia2, on 18 June 2019 - 03:00 PM, said:



Is this true, across the board, in Australian schools? If so, it is all kinds of wrong. A school has a duty of care to its students, and to prevent a teacher from taking action in a case where very significant injury is actually occurring, is outrageous. Do schools have their own policies on when actual physical intervention is warranted? Surely they wouldn't let the child in the headlock just remain there, while everyone evacuated?


I don't know what the policy is, but I have heard stories from my teacher friends & family about incidents where physical separation of students has been necessary.




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