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Start in same class or seperate?


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#26 doubledelight

Posted 14 May 2019 - 10:10 AM

My b/g twins are now 13 but we separated them from FYOS and for them it was the best decision and I've never regretted it.  They are very different personalities and have very different needs so we catered to their needs rather than their twinness.

You need to take into consideration what is best for your children and consult with the school they will be attending.  A lot of schools combine classes for different activities so even if they are in different classes there may be opportunities for shared activities.

#27 Lallalla

Posted 14 May 2019 - 06:20 PM

View PostERipley, on 13 May 2019 - 08:10 PM, said:



Oh I just realised you are the OP. Well your comment suggests to me you’re quite worried about the emotional distress they might suffer if you seperate them. It also suggests you’ve already made up your mind and just wanted reassurance you’re doing the right thing. Thing about the internet is not everyone is going to have the same opinion. 🤷🏻‍♀️

As others have said, all twins are different and I’m sure you know what will suit yours best. Good luck with it.

Perhaps my original post was not clear enough? I hear nothing but emoting about why I should keep them together and asked for the experiences of people who have separated them. Hard to definitively make up your mind when you’ve never spoken to someone who has done what you are considering.

Edited because I got my double negatives mixed up

Edited by Lallalla, 14 May 2019 - 06:21 PM.


#28 rainycat

Posted 14 May 2019 - 06:58 PM

A thousand apologies Lallalla, I misunderstood your post.

#29 Staying Strange

Posted 14 May 2019 - 08:37 PM

OP do you have access to an academic library? I've done a quick search through my uni library. Here are some links/abstracts... but they're probably protected/not free to access

- https://ethos.bl.uk/...bl.ethos.729737



- https://www.ncbi.nlm...ubmed/29658740/

- Lacina, J. (2010). School placement and separation of twins: a review of research. Childhood Education, 86(3), 172+. Retrieved from http://link.galegrou...MI&xid=ed04f881


No effect of classroom sharing on educational achievement in twins: a prospective, longitudinal cohort study
T J C Polderman, M Bartels, F C Verhulst, A C Huizink, C E M van Beijsterveldt and D I Boomsma
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (1979-)
Vol. 64, No. 1 (January 2010), pp. 36-40 (5 pages)
Abstract
Background: A returning dilemma for families with multiple births is whether twins should share the same, or a parallel classroom, or in other words, whether they should be separated at school or not. This study investigated the effects of sharing a classroom during primary school on cognitive achievement in twins. Method: Subjects were 839 monozygotic and 1164 dizygotic twin pairs who were registered at birth at The Netherlands Twin Register. A prospective, longitudinal study design was used with educational achievement at age 12 years, measured with a standardised test (CITO test), as outcome measure. Results: Most twin pairs (72%) shared a classroom during their schooling, 19% were in separate, but parallel, classes, and 9% "partly" shared a classroom. Twins who were in parallel classrooms had higher CITO scores (mean 539.51; SD 8.12), compared to twins who shared a classroom (537.99; SD 8.52). When controlling for socioeconomic status, and externalising problems before starting primary school (age 3), there was no significant difference in educational achievement between separated and non-separated twin pairs (p = 0.138). In addition, there was no interaction with sex or zygosity of the twins (p = 0.798). Conclusion: There is no difference in educational achievement between twins who share a classroom and twins who do not share a classroom during their primary school time. The choice of separation should be made by teachers, parents and their twin children, based on individual characteristics of a twin pair.



- Volume 7, Issue 2 01 April 2004 , pp. 115-124
What Effect Does Classroom Separation Have on Twins' Behavior, Progress at School, and Reading Abilities?
Lucy A. Tully (a1), Terrie E. Moffitt (a2), Avshalom Caspi (a3), Alan Taylor (a4) ...
https://doi-org.ezp....75/twin.7.2.115
Published online: 01 February 2012
Abstract
We investigated the effects of classroom separation on twins' behavior, progress at school, and reading abilities. This investigation was part of a longitudinal study of a nationally-representative sample of twins (the E-risk Study) who were assessed at the start of school (age 5) and followed up (age 7). We examined three groups of twins: pairs who were in the same class at both ages; pairs who were in separate classes at both ages; and pairs who were in the same class at age 5, but separated by age 7. When compared to those not separated, those separated early had significantly more teacher-rated internalizing problems and those separated later showed more internalizing problems and lower reading scores. Monozygotic (MZ) twins showed more problems as a result of separation than dizygotic (DZ) twins. No group differences emerged for externalizing problems, ADHD or prosocial behaviors. The implications of the findings for parents and teachers of twins, and for school practices about separating twins, are discussed.



I've only very quickly glanced at them so not sure if they address your specific concern.

Good luck. We're a year behind you and Wil have to make this decision for our frat twin girls year after next


Edited - to fix weird formatting.

Edited by Staying Strange, 14 May 2019 - 08:40 PM.





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