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Dog training for older dogs?


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#1 limakilo

Posted 17 June 2019 - 08:50 PM

Has anyone "puppy trained" their older dogs?

A family member has two beautiful dachshunds, one is 3 and the other is 4 to 6ish, he was a rescue so we don't know for sure.
Neither are desexed (that's the first step), and they both pee and poo in her house, and are not trained in any way.
I know they would benefit from training just even for basic things like stop and stay and sit etc, let alone the pooping and peeing everywhere.

Today we were helping move house for her, and the older dog got out and made it 4 or so streets away, only stopping because it got wedged in a fence.
One more street and it would have reached one of the busiest intersections in our city. My super fit 19 year old and my fairly fit DH were in hot pursuit and he still was faster than them, with those little 10cm long legs.
Apart from coming home and crying at the thought of losing her dog and having to tell her, I really want to help her and the dogs, and was hoping someone could share their dog training advice with us, things to look for in a professional.
Anyone had success with older dogs?

#2 kadoodle

Posted 17 June 2019 - 10:33 PM

I took in an older (8 to10 was the guess) kelpie x collie last year. I ended up getting private lessons through a dog obedience trainer, as she’d been breeding stock in a puppy mill and was pretty fearful and had never had any training. As someone who’s not an expert, I felt much more confident to rehabilitate my dog with an expert I could go to for help and some hand holding.

#3 Cheesy Sanga

Posted 17 June 2019 - 10:50 PM

We took our new to us 5yo dog to puppy training as the person who had the dog previously had not trained it at all. I'd wait til the dogs are desexed and used to your family member before trying puppy training. We went within a couple weeks of getting the dog which was too soon. The puppy school assessed our dog as partially graduated, lol. After the official puppy training of 6 or 8 weeks was over we kept trying with the training at home. As the dog got used to us the training was more successful. Desexing helped as well.

#4 limakilo

Posted 18 June 2019 - 09:41 PM

Thank you both.
She has had the younger dog since it was a puppy, and the older dog that ran for at least a year now.
We think that he was used as a breeding dog too, breaks my heart.
He absolutely loves my family member, but is terrified of anyone else and will go and sit in a corner until he is used to you.
I went to her house to help again today, and while some other family members were in the yard, I sat with him, and it took it about 40 minutes to come over and sit next to me.
Kadoodle, I think the private lessons is what they will need.
Thank you both for giving me hope that older dogs can be helped too.

#5 JoanJett

Posted 19 June 2019 - 10:35 AM

Did she get the older dog from a rescue shelter?  The one near us has trainers and you must sign up to a continuing training course as a condition of adoption.  If there are any shelters nearby, it might be worth investigating, as the trainers are usually very familiar with the common behaviours seen in rescue dogs and they often progress the dog/s from one-on-one training to socialisation with people and other dogs.  If you go the private route, it would be important to screen for a trainer familiar with the breed and rescue dogs.  

Older dogs can definitely helped, but it's just as often about training the owner as the dogs, particularly if she has had one of them since it was a puppy and it's not trained at all at 3 years.

Good luck.

#6 *Spikey*

Posted 19 June 2019 - 04:42 PM

When I spent my weekends dog training, I did a lot of training with older dogs. People stepped up to getting some training done for a variety of reasons, some rescue, some convenience, some price (it was a real bargain), some because it was a fundraiser for a local community organisation.

The older dogs take to it like a duck to water. They're past the sillies, and when the penny drops that you can communicate with your human, well! It's all on from there.

If she has an obedience club nearby, I'd recommend that - they are really good value for money, and they teach more advanced skills (like recall) as part of the year long curriculum. They usually have good fences, off leash areas, and other small dogs in the classes, so the dogs get a really good opportunity to socialise.  And most, if not all, have experience with rescue dogs joining in so they can bond with their peoples and gain confidence.

What more could you want? Do it!!!!!

#7 limakilo

Posted 20 June 2019 - 07:26 PM

View PostJoanJett, on 19 June 2019 - 10:35 AM, said:

Did she get the older dog from a rescue shelter?  The one near us has trainers and you must sign up to a continuing training course as a condition of adoption.  
He was from an organisation that rehome, but it was interstate, and to be honest, although I don't know what organisation it was, I don't think much of them because they sent my family member an entire male dog, and since we think he was used for breeding, why would they do that!?
Why not desex him before he was rehomed, for his own sake?

#8 JoanJett

Posted 20 June 2019 - 07:35 PM

View Postlimakilo, on 20 June 2019 - 07:26 PM, said:

He was from an organisation that rehome, but it was interstate, and to be honest, although I don't know what organisation it was, I don't think much of them because they sent my family member an entire male dog, and since we think he was used for breeding, why would they do that!?
Why not desex him before he was rehomed, for his own sake?

Quite rightly.  The rescue shelter near us desexes all its dogs at "admission", with the generous help of our vet donating services.

I think rescuing and rehoming dogs is an admirable goal and there's no doubt it's an under-resourced area, but it would be good to see commitment to giving the dogs a chance to succeed with recommendations and support for how to make that happen.

#9 kadoodle

Posted 20 June 2019 - 07:41 PM

View PostJoanJett, on 20 June 2019 - 07:35 PM, said:



Quite rightly.  The rescue shelter near us desexes all its dogs at "admission", with the generous help of our vet donating services.

I think rescuing and rehoming dogs is an admirable goal and there's no doubt it's an under-resourced area, but it would be good to see commitment to giving the dogs a chance to succeed with recommendations and support for how to make that happen.

I once wound up with an entire female cat, with a pen drawn fake tattoo in her ear. There are some dodgy operators out there. No one reputable would rehome (as opposed to foster out) anything with balls.




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