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English grades dropping Year 3


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#1 amberlee

Posted 02 July 2019 - 05:07 PM

My daughter is 8 years old, in Year 3.  Up until now, she has generally received an A (sometimes a B) for English on her reports. Her latest report for the past Semester has her at a C level.  She's a pretty clever little thing, getting A's in nearly every subject, including Maths and the extension language classes she does.

So I was curious that she might be struggling with something in particular and my daughter was a bit upset too, so I said we'd have a chat to her teacher to find out what she can improve a little more.  

Her Teacher couldn't see any area for concern, saying that she's a solid C and I should be happy with that. Which I would be happy about if I didn't feel she was perhaps going backwards in her skills.  She suggested a website which we could do at home to improve her story-writing skills which we will do a bit with. But that was all.

Does this seem reasonable? Should I just accept that she has dropped back in her abilities. I guess I probably should, but a little niggling part of me is saying no, it doesn't seem right, and she might need some extra help or something? I don't know, so thought I'd get other people's thoughts- thank you!



#2 chillipeppers

Posted 02 July 2019 - 05:30 PM

I imagine the teacher this year is a harder marker than previous years and would generally put it down to that if she can’t offer any areas of improvement.

#3 Kreme

Posted 02 July 2019 - 05:48 PM

There is a jump up in expectations in year 3, however there are also teachers who say things like “you should be happy with a C.” Clearly there are children whose ability means that a C is not a good result for them, and if your child is one of those then it’s completely ok to question if there is a problem.

If she can’t make any suggestions on how to improve then you may just have to ignore the grade.



#4 c00l

Posted 02 July 2019 - 06:26 PM

I had similar concerns with my yr4 DD's report (usually a B English student but a C for this report). However, her teacher was much more informative than yours when I asked her if my daughter's progress has stalled-ie) high Cs for three written tasks and Bs for the other two and an B for reading tasks so it averaged out as a C. She also said that I was most welcome to have a look at her work and rubrics used next term which I will do as it seems her grammar and punctuation are her weaker areas, so I should be able to help her with that. Anyway I'm just including all that information  to let you know that I think your daughter's teacher should/could be more specific/detailed in her feedback.

#5 EPZ

Posted 02 July 2019 - 07:03 PM

My DD didn’t move in reading, last report, recent one now jumped a year ahead, in 6 months. We’ve done nothing different (she reads daily since starting school).

When I eventually asked, last year, the teacher said she had an ILP, with goals and hadn’t quite met them all.

Maybe after break, found her mojo again this year. Same thing happened to my son. I know now it’s all ok but it is nice when the teacher can give you reassurance that all is OK. Or if there is an area you can work on.

Edited by RuntotheRiver, 02 July 2019 - 07:04 PM.


#6 mpoppins92

Posted 02 July 2019 - 07:29 PM

I teach year 3 and I had several students who had dropped from A’s and B’s to high C’s in English this semester.

Partly it was due to the content being a bit harder in year 3 but it’s mostly writing and grammar that have let mine down. They now have a range of punctuation to draw on but they stick with full stops, they have learnt about conjunctions and compound sentences but they don’t use them etc. With more extension and scaffolding I’m sure most of them can shift up but I think some of mine were used to doing well so they weren’t pushing themselves or taking on feedback. I know they can do it but they need to show me.

#7 ipsee

Posted 02 July 2019 - 10:04 PM

The teacher should at least be able to tell you her weaker areas, even if they think you should be happy with the C.

One of my kids struggled around year 3 when writing tasks became reports and persuasive texts, not just creative writing.

#8 Expelliarmus

Posted 02 July 2019 - 10:42 PM

View Postamberlee, on 02 July 2019 - 05:07 PM, said:

My daughter is 8 years old, in Year 3.  Up until now, she has generally received an A (sometimes a B) for English on her reports. Her latest report for the past Semester has her at a C level.  She's a pretty clever little thing, getting A's in nearly every subject, including Maths and the extension language classes she does.

So I was curious that she might be struggling with something in particular and my daughter was a bit upset too, so I said we'd have a chat to her teacher to find out what she can improve a little more.  

Her Teacher couldn't see any area for concern, saying that she's a solid C and I should be happy with that. Which I would be happy about if I didn't feel she was perhaps going backwards in her skills.  She suggested a website which we could do at home to improve her story-writing skills which we will do a bit with. But that was all.

Does this seem reasonable? Should I just accept that she has dropped back in her abilities. I guess I probably should, but a little niggling part of me is saying no, it doesn't seem right, and she might need some extra help or something? I don't know, so thought I'd get other people's thoughts- thank you!
Technically a C does mean there is no cause for concern. And yes, a drop in Year 3 or 4 is quite common because the curriculum expectations get higher.

However your daughter is still entitled to be told which areas she could be working on.

I wouldn't say she necessarily needs extra help, and it is not unusual for students to drop back a bit at some point at the transition from Early Years to Primary but I would expect a much more targeted and informative approach to assisting a child with where they can improve. Vague directions to a website abut story-writing skills is not good enough and I would want further clarification.

#9 Julie3Girls

Posted 26 July 2019 - 05:04 PM

With perfect hindsight, a drop in English grades in year 3 was the first sign of my daughter’s dyslexia. Which wasn’t diagnosed until yr 7 in high school.
All the primary teachers would throw the “C is right where she is meant to be”, that there was no problem with her spelling, and that she just needed to remember her spelling and punctuation rules.

First child, and all her teachers telling me there was no problem ....

Not saying this  is the case for you, but it’s worth digging a bit and keeping an eye on it.

Edited by Julie3Girls, 26 July 2019 - 05:04 PM.


#10 QuirkyMum

Posted 26 July 2019 - 05:26 PM

Just a different teacher marking her work...

#11 I'mBeachedAs

Posted 26 July 2019 - 08:21 PM

Hmmmm I'd keep a close eye on it. Consider getting a speech pathologist to look at language and literacy to see if there are any areas of weakness.

#12 I'mBeachedAs

Posted 26 July 2019 - 08:23 PM

Hmmmm I'd keep a close eye on it. Consider getting a speech pathologist to look at language and literacy to see if there are any areas of weakness.




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