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#1 Green Gummy Bear

Posted 26 July 2019 - 02:22 PM

I have a degree in Health Sciences, I did this because I needed to study externally, and I have an interest in health. All good, except it's quite a generic degree and there really aren't the jobs out there with no experience to back it up.

Which means I'm going to have to do some postgrad study. I'm particularly interested in people's experiences, and my ideal line of work would be counselling, social support, that kind of thing. I'm considering Masters in Counselling, but are there still plenty of counselling jobs out there? Social work is off the table, as I can't do so lengthy unpaid placements with current situation.

Masters of public health looks appealing, but it again seems quite vague.

Are there other avenues I should explore? What have others gone on to do with a health sciences degree?

#2 BusbyWilkes

Posted 26 July 2019 - 02:30 PM

Possibly 2 year masters in OT or Speech Path? Lots of jobs usually (perhaps dependent on where you live), full or part time hours, building relationships with clients/patients. There will be praccomponents, but no where near as long as the Social Work pracs are.

#3 Thursday

Posted 26 July 2019 - 03:30 PM

View PostBusbyWilkes, on 26 July 2019 - 02:30 PM, said:

Possibly 2 year masters in OT or Speech Path? Lots of jobs usually (perhaps dependent on where you live), full or part time hours, building relationships with clients/patients. There will be praccomponents, but no where near as long as the Social Work pracs are.

I think it would be the same amount of prac? Most allied health type qualifications need 1000 hours of practical experience. There might be more flexibility about how to get those hours though, possibly you could do projects rather than 40-hour-week work placements.

#4 Green Gummy Bear

Posted 26 July 2019 - 05:03 PM

View PostThursday, on 26 July 2019 - 03:30 PM, said:

I think it would be the same amount of prac? Most allied health type qualifications need 1000 hours of practical experience. There might be more flexibility about how to get those hours though, possibly you could do projects rather than 40-hour-week work placements.

Yes, they're all about the 1000 hours.

#5 BusbyWilkes

Posted 26 July 2019 - 06:12 PM

View PostThursday, on 26 July 2019 - 03:30 PM, said:



I think it would be the same amount of prac? Most allied health type qualifications need 1000 hours of practical experience. There might be more flexibility about how to get those hours though, possibly you could do projects rather than 40-hour-week work placements.

Sorry - does require 1000 practice hours too. More meant that SW tends to be 10 weeks full time per prac (which is a long time to not earn money for and to arrange child care for) whereas OT/SP often have 5 weeks. IME some of the prac hours also come from prac sessions in tutorials, rather than going out on full time prac.
Just seemed like a good fit for your skills and interests...

#6 lizzzard

Posted 26 July 2019 - 06:23 PM

I would imagine counselling roles must be somewhat in demand given the rise in anxiety and depression rates, especially amongst young people. I think some people manage to get paid roles that then count towards their supervised practice (I’ve seen that in psych at least).

#7 UniKitty

Posted 26 July 2019 - 07:36 PM

I am currently studying a Grad Dip in Public Health and have already earned a Policy Officer position with the Dept of Health. Interesting and varied work researching for health based Minister briefings, Ministerials, Parliamentary questions etc.

No prac required.

#8 c.sanders

Posted 26 July 2019 - 09:51 PM

What about health safety and environment?  Lots of jobs for that.

#9 Green Gummy Bear

Posted 26 July 2019 - 09:55 PM

View PostUniKitty, on 26 July 2019 - 07:36 PM, said:

I am currently studying a Grad Dip in Public Health and have already earned a Policy Officer position with the Dept of Health. Interesting and varied work researching for health based Minister briefings, Ministerials, Parliamentary questions etc.

No prac required.

Can I ask what your previous background is? Was it just a case of applying for an advertised job, or did you have a connection?

#10 Green Gummy Bear

Posted 26 July 2019 - 09:59 PM

View PostBusbyWilkes, on 26 July 2019 - 06:12 PM, said:

Sorry - does require 1000 practice hours too. More meant that SW tends to be 10 weeks full time per prac (which is a long time to not earn money for and to arrange child care for) whereas OT/SP often have 5 weeks. IME some of the prac hours also come from prac sessions in tutorials, rather than going out on full time prac.
Just seemed like a good fit for your skills and interests...

Even 5 works unpaid, and having to pay for before/after school care isn't really workable for my family. Thanks for the idea though.

#11 UniKitty

Posted 26 July 2019 - 11:16 PM

View PostGreen Gummy Bear, on 26 July 2019 - 09:55 PM, said:

Can I ask what your previous background is? Was it just a case of applying for an advertised job, or did you have a connection?

I do have a clinical allied health undergrad. But I applied for a short term EOI thinking I had no chance, turned out I interview well and had the skillset that the Dept was seeking. It was the 'currently studying Grad Dip PH' that got my foot in the door.




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