Jump to content

Return to study with already a B.Ed?


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 mummyoh

Posted 26 July 2019 - 08:58 PM

Hi!
I already have a bachelor of education in primary teaching and worked as a teacher for 12 years before having kids. I want to have a career change to Midwifery, I thought id ask the brains trust if anyone can give advice or knows where to go from here. Ive completed one year of my Bachelor of Nursing already, through Federation Uni but the placement locations have stopped me from continuing.
From what i can see, all postgrad mid courses require you to be a registered nurse, so my question is does anyone know if you can use an undergraduate degree in any way to fast track a degree in Nursing or Midwifery (or both), the same way you can use, say your business or sports science degrees to get into a teaching degree?
Thanks in anticipation, I cannot wait to get started on my new beginning...

Edited by mummyoh, 26 July 2019 - 09:35 PM.


#2 FuzzyChocolateToes

Posted 26 July 2019 - 09:46 PM

Uni of Melbourne has a graduate degree  the Masters of Nursing Science.
https://study.unimel...ursing-science/

#3 mummyoh

Posted 26 July 2019 - 10:02 PM

View PostFuzzyChocolateToes, on 26 July 2019 - 09:46 PM, said:

Uni of Melbourne has a graduate degree  the Masters of Nursing Science.
https://study.unimel...ursing-science/

I'll have a look- Im guessing nursing science is to be a registered nurse?

#4 Green Gummy Bear

Posted 26 July 2019 - 10:26 PM

What about the placement locations isn't working? The Masters linked above does give you registration, but it's super competitive. It's great if you can get in, but you'll spend a lot of hours in Parkville, both on campus and placements. A friend of mine did this course, and it was a huge foot in the door doing placements at the 'Royal' group of hospitals.

#5 mummyoh

Posted 26 July 2019 - 10:41 PM

View PostGreen Gummy Bear, on 26 July 2019 - 10:26 PM, said:

What about the placement locations isn't working? The Masters linked above does give you registration, but it's super competitive. It's great if you can get in, but you'll spend a lot of hours in Parkville, both on campus and placements. A friend of mine did this course, and it was a huge foot in the door doing placements at the 'Royal' group of hospitals.

I live in Regional victoria. I know I have the marks to get in to the courses, but I have two young children and the location and timing of placements is killing me. Im also a SAHM, I dont get Austudy and I could not afford travel or accomodation to spend 5 weeks in Ballarat, Stawell or Sale which is where Fed placed their students. They just gave no regard to where you lived, even though hospitals are literally on my doorstep, I understand that placements are hard to get, but still...
I don't  want to work at the Royal Hospitals long term. Its frustrating trying to work out how I can make this career move work for me!!

#6 Green Gummy Bear

Posted 26 July 2019 - 10:45 PM

View Postmummyoh, on 26 July 2019 - 10:41 PM, said:

I live in Regional victoria. I know I have the marks to get in to the courses, but I have two young children and the location and timing of placements is killing me. Im also a SAHM, I dont get Austudy and I could not afford travel or accomodation to spend 5 weeks in Ballarat, Stawell or Sale which is where Fed placed their students. They just gave no regard to where you lived, even though hospitals are literally on my doorstep, I understand that placements are hard to get, but still...
I don't  want to work at the Royal Hospitals long term. Its frustrating trying to work out how I can make this career move work for me!!

Oh yep, I hear you!

Most hospitals have partnerships, it might be worth contacting your local hospitals and see which universities they partner with for placements and go from there?

#7 FuzzyChocolateToes

Posted 26 July 2019 - 10:46 PM

View Postmummyoh, on 26 July 2019 - 10:02 PM, said:



I'll have a look- Im guessing nursing science is to be a registered nurse?
Yes that's right.

#8 mummyoh

Posted 26 July 2019 - 10:49 PM

View PostGreen Gummy Bear, on 26 July 2019 - 10:45 PM, said:

Oh yep, I hear you!

Most hospitals have partnerships, it might be worth contacting your local hospitals and see which universities they partner with for placements and go from there?

Thats a really good idea, working backwards! Thanks for the tip. :)

#9 -Belinda-

Posted 26 July 2019 - 10:52 PM

La Trobe has a midwifery degree without having to do nursing first, though I believe employment options are less.
https://www.latrobe....g-and-midwifery

Universities can offer advanced standing (credit) for elective subjects in the course that you could use your teaching degree for, as long as that degree there is space but you would need to contact them directly (ask for the course coordinator contact details and deal with them directly if possible)
https://www.latrobe....vanced-standing

#10 mummyoh

Posted 26 July 2019 - 11:02 PM

View Post-Belinda-, on 26 July 2019 - 10:52 PM, said:

La Trobe has a midwifery degree without having to do nursing first, though I believe employment options are less.
https://www.latrobe....g-and-midwifery

Universities can offer advanced standing (credit) for elective subjects in the course that you could use your teaching degree for, as long as that degree there is space but you would need to contact them directly (ask for the course coordinator contact details and deal with them directly if possible)
https://www.latrobe....vanced-standing

Thanks Belinda,
Ive been trying to get Monash to pass me on to a course co-ordinator and they just wont budge- they keep telling me to apply and then they address it after that. I agree it would be easier to speak to someone like that, I would have not wasted a year (and $$) at Fed uni if I had the opportunity to speak to someone from the start.

#11 Malkin Slinkhard

Posted 27 July 2019 - 09:06 AM

I’m nearly finished studying psychology after studying teaching, I’m doing it through Deakin. They gave me a year of credit for prior learning so it cut it down to a two year course. I don’t have to do any elective subjects. Talking to other people they seem to have been pretty generous giving credit for prior learning where they can for related study too - for example someone with a science degree didn’t need to do some of the units that linked with that. Placements are tricky though, it’s partly why I chose psychology.

#12 -Belinda-

Posted 27 July 2019 - 09:59 AM

It takes a lot of staff time to work out what advanced standing a student can have, so there is a reluctance to do so until a student commits to the course - they might not even apply or they might apply and not get in.

It is probably easier to ask for the course structure i.e. what subjects are required for the degree (some will be compulsory, some might give you a elective choice between A, B,C) but there is also likely to be elective subjects which you have completely free choice. It is these subjects for which you are likely to be able to get advanced standing from your BEd, which you should confirm once enrolled and before census date (approx month after starting) so you could then withdraw without penalty if you aren't happy.

For the compulsory and where you have to chose between 2 or more subjects, you may be able to get credit from your nursing year IF the subject aligns with the new content. More likely for first year, but they aren't going to commit to the answer until you are a student in the institution. If you look at your content and theirs, you may get an idea of likelihood but no guarantees.

Open days are running in August, so it may be useful to show up just to meet actual people on the ground in the degree you are interested in and get their contact details. They should be then able to forward you to the right people. This can be easier than getting the "shopfront" staff who may or may not be familiar with the questions you are asking.

La Trobe midwifery apparently has a solid reputation, I am part of the uni but not that part :) .

Edited by -Belinda-, 27 July 2019 - 10:06 AM.


#13 Meepy

Posted 27 July 2019 - 11:31 AM

One of my best friends did the masters at Melbourne and it was full on. She has 3 kids and a husband working full time. Her parents helped her with the kids a lot, travelling from rural Victoria to stay.  It all worked out well and she has a job in the private sector with suitable hours and no shift work. She is very happy.
Her primary motivation was to do midwifery but once she completed the masters realised she wasn't that interested in continuing studies.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.