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Do you tip?


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#51 AnythingGoes

Posted 27 July 2019 - 01:30 PM

I use taxis because I hate the idea of being scored. I just want to sit quietly in the back of the cab.

#52 SeaPrincess

Posted 27 July 2019 - 01:55 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 27 July 2019 - 10:29 AM, said:

I understood any tips get shared between the staff.
Not always, and if I’m in doubt, I will ask. Why should someone who does a great job subsidise people who just show up and do the bare minimum?

#53 jayskette

Posted 27 July 2019 - 02:00 PM

for exceptional service yes.

#54 Jane Jetson

Posted 27 July 2019 - 02:04 PM

View PostCimbom, on 27 July 2019 - 12:36 PM, said:

Why do people use cabs but not Uber?

1. It's what I'm used to

2. They're not centrally run by one corporation with a strong history of misogyny

3. The drivers might still be sitting there thinking, "Old, fat, would not bang, and doesn't seem receptive to my alt-right ranting" but at least they can't give me poor marks for it and make it harder for me to use the system in the future.

#55 StartledFlamingo

Posted 27 July 2019 - 02:49 PM

OT but I use Uber because the sleeze factor from the drivers is much less, as it the BO/ stale smoke smell.

But the gig economy is a worry, as is the business model of taking commission for things others make or provide ie hotel booking sites.

Edited by StartledFlamingo, 27 July 2019 - 02:49 PM.


#56 born.a.girl

Posted 27 July 2019 - 02:57 PM

View PostSeaPrincess, on 27 July 2019 - 01:55 PM, said:

Not always, and if I’m in doubt, I will ask. Why should someone who does a great job subsidise people who just show up and do the bare minimum?

Because I don't know that. If the person you give it to has only been marginally responsible for the lovely meal you've had, then why should they get it all?

Why should only the person you have immediate face to face contact with at the restaurant get it all?  Why not the rest of the staff.

If I had that approach, I'd not tip at all, because it wouldn't be unreasonable to assume they're all being appropriately paid.

So many places you pay on the way out.  Quite often it's not the person who served you who takes the money etc etc.

#57 Inkogneatoh

Posted 27 July 2019 - 03:31 PM

View PostCimbom, on 27 July 2019 - 12:36 PM, said:

Why do people use cabs but not Uber? Cab drivers get pretty low wages as well. Most of the money goes to the plate owners.
For us it's a few reasons.
1 - Mum was in a wheelchair. We needed a vehicle that could load that into.
2 - When in town, we had the personal number of our preferred driver. We didn't need to go through the central booking and play roulette with the few creepy drivers (most we got before we got the direct number where OK, but our guy is awesome).
2 - I live in the "sticks". Uber only started in December. We don't have Uber Eats.

#58 SeaPrincess

Posted 27 July 2019 - 03:36 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 27 July 2019 - 02:57 PM, said:

Because I don't know that. If the person you give it to has only been marginally responsible for the lovely meal you've had, then why should they get it all?

Why should only the person you have immediate face to face contact with at the restaurant get it all?  Why not the rest of the staff.

If I had that approach, I'd not tip at all, because it wouldn't be unreasonable to assume they're all being appropriately paid.

So many places you pay on the way out.  Quite often it's not the person who served you who takes the money etc etc.

The tip isn’t for the meal, it’s for the service. When I was waitressing, my American boss explained it this way: customers pay for the meal, but they tip for the service. In the US, no tip = rude customer, poor tip = poor service.

ETA I was waitressing in an upmarket restaurant in a country town in WA, not in the US.

Edited by SeaPrincess, 27 July 2019 - 03:41 PM.


#59 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 27 July 2019 - 03:43 PM

If we go out to dinner, we often leave a tip in terms of rounding up to the nearest $5 or $10.. Example, bill might be $82, so we might leave $85 or $90. There is no guarantee that the tip you leave is given only to the wait staff who served you. In Australia, I have never given a 15, 20 or 25% tip (some of the tip options we were given in the US recently)

We don't usually tip delivery people. In fact, I can't think of when we have ever done that but we rarely get food/meals delivered anyway.

#60 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 27 July 2019 - 03:51 PM

View PostSeaPrincess, on 27 July 2019 - 03:36 PM, said:

The tip isn’t for the meal, it’s for the service. When I was waitressing, my American boss explained it this way: customers pay for the meal, but they tip for the service. In the US, no tip = rude customer, poor tip = poor service.
Our first day in the US (San Francisco), I asked the waitress what was an acceptable tip. I could tell it made her feel awkward but I explained that tipping is not the norm in Australia and that I didn't want to under-tip or over-tip, but that I just needed a baseline of where to go.

The waitress said that 10% is considered a poor tip, 15-20% is considered a standard tip and 25% or more is considered a great tip. But she also mentioned that no tip reflects more on the customer and if you plan on going back to the same establishment, you probably wouldn't be made to feel welcome if you had previously left without a tip.

For the next 6 weeks while we were travelling through California, Utah, Arizona, Nevada etc, her advice seemed to be pretty good. With credit machines at restaurant and similar, the automatic tip options were often 15, 20 and 25%.

Bigger tips were expected in restaurants that had a variety of wait/service people - a host/hostess to show you to your seat, the drinks staff, & the wait staff, for example.

#61 seayork2002

Posted 27 July 2019 - 04:01 PM

Some people tip the individual staff member and others mean it to be for the all the staff shared out.

So another confusion (from a conversation i had years ago)

#62 SFmummyto3

Posted 27 July 2019 - 05:38 PM

I don’t tip at all in Australia. With food delivery people though I haven’t actually tipped them but then feel bad afterwards as if I should’ve given them cash. How much would be an appropriate amount for a delivery person on a bike or scooter?

#63 MissMilla

Posted 27 July 2019 - 06:28 PM

Always. Husband used to be a waiter. We tip 10-20% everywhere we go.

#64 MissMilla

Posted 27 July 2019 - 06:33 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 27 July 2019 - 02:57 PM, said:



Because I don't know that. If the person you give it to has only been marginally responsible for the lovely meal you've had, then why should they get it all?

Why should only the person you have immediate face to face contact with at the restaurant get it all?  Why not the rest of the staff.

If I had that approach, I'd not tip at all, because it wouldn't be unreasonable to assume they're all being appropriately paid.

So many places you pay on the way out.  Quite often it's not the person who served you who takes the money etc etc.

Where i live atm the tip is usually gathered and split between all waiters and chefs. My husband worked in several places as a waiter and in the kitchen and it was always done like that.
Not sure about other countries though, but he studied hotel school abroad and thats also what they were taught was the norm.

#65 lizzzard

Posted 27 July 2019 - 06:40 PM

After living in Canada and working in the US I used to tip a lot, even after moving back.

Nowadays I rarely tip - the use of tap'n'go has almost eliminated tipping for me. The only exceptions are for:
1. Menulog deliveries
2. High end restaurants
3. Taxis when I go a very short distance

#66 lizzzard

Posted 27 July 2019 - 06:42 PM

View PostSFmummyto3, on 27 July 2019 - 05:38 PM, said:

I don’t tip at all in Australia. With food delivery people though I haven’t actually tipped them but then feel bad afterwards as if I should’ve given them cash. How much would be an appropriate amount for a delivery person on a bike or scooter?
I usually give $3-$5

#67 lizzzard

Posted 27 July 2019 - 06:51 PM

View PostCimbom, on 27 July 2019 - 12:36 PM, said:

Why do people use cabs but not Uber? Cab drivers get pretty low wages as well. Most of the money goes to the plate owners.
Errrr...I'm going to resist the urge to get on my soap box but will just its because I refuse to support a corporation that is so blatantly unethical.

#68 MarciaB

Posted 27 July 2019 - 06:54 PM

We tip at table service restaurants (10-20% depending on service).

I also tip the pizza / Thai food delivery guy $5.  Reason is because I briefly did that job and I used to only get paid per delivery so the hourly rate was abysmal.no idea if things have changed but I remember how grateful I was for a few coins so I tip. We don’t use Uber Eats.

#69 kimasa

Posted 27 July 2019 - 07:10 PM

No way to tipping. In my restaurant working life/stories from friends I know the money does not go to the wait staff.

On the cabs issue, I use taxis or Shebah. I've had a handful of Uber experiences and not a single one has been positive.

#70 Chocolate Addict

Posted 27 July 2019 - 07:31 PM

We don't get home delivery.

When we go out in a group, as others said,we round up our individual totals and they get the change. Sometimes it is a dollar, sometimes $10.

It hadn't occurred to me to tip the Uber drivers with cash. I might have to start. I don't know about the corporate side of them but on ground level they are so much better than taxi's. I want to get in a clean, fresh smelling car, not one that smells of sweat.

#71 Lunafreya

Posted 27 July 2019 - 10:25 PM

Uber is safer for me. My phone has a record of the driver and car. Also the fact someone else can pay for it helps. I wish Uber had been around when I’d been young and young out. My parents might have preferred me getting an Uber home they paid for rather than getting out of bed to pick me up or even come down to pay the cab driver

#72 EmmDasher

Posted 27 July 2019 - 10:50 PM

No, we almost never tip in Australia. When we go out as big groups there’s a default ‘keep the change’ when everyone tosses cash in. We’ve tipped once or twice when the service at restaurants has been exceptional. But generally not.

I don’t use Uber because I’m generally using taxis for work and work will only pay for regular taxis. Uber isn’t allowed. I’ve never asked why but I assume for insurance reasons. I find the idea of being rated highly distasteful also.

#73 nom_de_plume

Posted 27 July 2019 - 10:53 PM

Never, unless I’m holidaying in the US.

#74 Ellie bean

Posted 27 July 2019 - 11:32 PM

I tip Uber eats drivers cash and I insist DH does it too, otherwise I figure we would be saying it’s ok to exploit people and not pay them a living wage for our convenience
We can afford to though, I know it’s not that easy for everyone

#75 literally nobody

Posted 28 July 2019 - 09:58 AM

Nope.!I refuse to tip someone who is doing their job. Nobody tips our self employed business either nor do we expect it. Everyone is broke as it is with rising costs of living. If we get to go to dinner- it’s a treat, I don’t have spare $ to tip anyone. If the service is fantastic I do make a point to thank them and tell management how great said person is.




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