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Should a six month old know their name?


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#1 Minnie80

Posted 30 July 2019 - 11:09 PM

My DD doesn't. But it seems it's expected at this age?

Edited by Minnie80, 30 July 2019 - 11:22 PM.


#2 Sweet.Pea

Posted 31 July 2019 - 08:07 AM

Nope

#3 StoneFoxArrow

Posted 31 July 2019 - 08:22 AM

By "know" I assume you mean "will respond to"?

I think it's normal for it to be around 6 or 7 months. From memory, my MACH nurse asked at the 6 month checkup if my DD was responding. I would mention it if you have a checkup, but probably wouldn't worry about it too much yet (like most things with babies/young children).

#4 Freddie'sMum

Posted 31 July 2019 - 09:14 AM

Oh dear OP.

Is someone giving you grief that baby doesn't "know' his / her name at 6 months old ?  My answer is that at 6 months old baby is still getting used to the world and knowing / responding to their own name is not a benchmark that needs to be reached this early.

In other words, no.  Don't worry about it.

#5 born.a.girl

Posted 31 July 2019 - 09:31 AM

I can't remember, but I suspect some of it would have to do with how easy the name is to differentiate from other language.

A child whose name has three syllables is going to be later recognising their name in a sentence that a child whose name is one short sharp syllable.

#6 robhat

Posted 31 July 2019 - 09:42 AM

If you have a group of mum friends who are all comparing whether or not their kids 'know' their name at 6 months old, you need another group of friends. Or, if you have read this in a book, burn the book and stop reading such nonsense.

The only thing you need to be concerned about here is hearing and does your child respond to sounds. If they turn their head to locate a noise like a bell or a clap, then it's fine.

Knowing their name would depend a lot on how much their parents use it and how. It's actually quite possible to talk to people you know at length without using their name. I'd hazard a guess that the eldest child in a family probably 'knows' their name rather early due to the parents fussing all over it and calling out it's name every 3 seconds while a 5th child probably has no idea who they are other than 'the baby'.

#7 Gonzy

Posted 31 July 2019 - 09:54 AM

Quote

If you have a group of mum friends who are all comparing whether or not their kids 'know' their name at 6 months old, you need another group of friends. Or, if you have read this in a book, burn the book and stop reading such nonsense.

This needs repeating.

#8 seayork2002

Posted 31 July 2019 - 09:58 AM

I have no idea we never called DS by his name, I mean that in we had lots of different nicknames/baby/variants on his actual name I don't really remember as a baby using his real first name as such

#9 iwanttosleepin

Posted 31 July 2019 - 10:18 AM

My boys all respond to each others names (and that of the dog).  Thank goodness because I get them mixed up all the time.  There's no excuse as they are wildly different in ages.....

#10 AliasMater

Posted 31 July 2019 - 10:30 AM

I'd say if you are concerned about your child's development, head to a child health nurse for assessment or reassurance.

They may have you complete an ASQ assessment just to see where your child is sitting development wise. You can probably Google the ASQ for 6 months for a quick peruse. Generally, delayed and even skipped milestones in isolation are of no concern. The ASQ will show if there is an area of delay, or global delay, if any.

#11 Lunafreya

Posted 31 July 2019 - 10:40 AM

They should know your voice from others, but knowing a mother’s and to some extent father’s voice happens before birth

#12 AliasMater

Posted 31 July 2019 - 10:41 AM

http://www.southernh...vicetype=Inline

- If you call to your baby when you are out of sight, does she look in the direction of your voice?

- When a loud noise occurs, does your baby turn to see where the sound came from?

This is 2 of 6 questions related to your concern OP, under the communication heading. Answers are Yes, Sometimes, Not Yet.

Even if you answer not yet, it may still be in the scope of normal depending how you answer the other 4 questions. Again, talk to a child health nurse if you have concerns. The ASQ needs to be scored properly. I am just posting it so you can get an idea of what the average 6 month old is doing.

#13 mayahlb

Posted 31 July 2019 - 11:10 AM

Minnie - I know you are concerned that you DD may end up being on the spectrum just like your older child but I don't think worry about these little things is going to be helpful. She's only very young yet and at an age where things can literally change overnight.

And even then not knowing there name isn't always a sign. My ASD son knew his name fine (can't remember when he recognized it but he would always pay attention when either of his parents talked to him.) I don't think that is even a considered a milestone until closer to 1. ASD is rarely ever considered this young.

To the PP recommending seeing the local MCHN, minnie is based overseas, Egypt I think from memory.

#14 afterlaughter

Posted 31 July 2019 - 11:42 AM

Both mine didn’t really respond to there name till 9/10 months old. Personally would only be worried if they didn’t know there name by 1.

#15 Minnie80

Posted 31 July 2019 - 05:55 PM

She responds to sounds and sometimes to my voice. But not her name. My son is ASD and didn't respond to his name until he was past 18 months. With my DD, I thought that this is something I don't have to worry about until she is 1 year old. But I was surprised to find out that it is a six month milestone. And there are heaps of mothers online saying their kids knew their names from 4 months upwards. Of course!

#16 Jenflea

Posted 31 July 2019 - 06:45 PM

I find it VERY hard to believe a 4 month old baby knows it's name.


My 9 yr old often doesn't respond to her name or my voice and she's NT!

#17 mayahlb

Posted 31 July 2019 - 06:53 PM

My kids respond to T..., R... whichever kid you are ;)

Minnie I asked a speech therapist friend at work and she said she would worry at this age. If she’s 1 and jot reloading to her name, then maybe you should look into it further but under 1 it can be very hit and miss for a child to respond to their name consistently. It is also dependant on how much you talk to them using their name. If you are really worried then just do some simple games where you point to her and say her name, then point to yourself and say mum, just point out things and name them. She will be fine.

Also even if she is autistic, there is very little early intervention that will be relevant at her age. It won’t make any difference at all if she is or isn’t at this point in time. You can’t change what will be.

#18 Islander

Posted 31 July 2019 - 07:42 PM

https://www.speechpa...00-aaebdd4451fd

Not sure if the link will work but it’s a 12 month milestone as per Speech Pathology Australia. My own (very typically developing) children demonstrated this at 10 months (DD1) and 11 months (DD2). They definitely responded to my voice (I.e. turned and looked) much earlier, but didn’t discriminate for their names till then.

#19 harryhoo

Posted 31 July 2019 - 07:42 PM

Nope. My kids didn't... but they responded to tones in voices. So if you say their name in a happy sing song voice with a big smike, they might smile back. Certainly doesn't mean they know their name - their mimicking what's in front of them. Or smiling at recognition of a parents/familiar voice.

#20 I'mBeachedAs

Posted 31 July 2019 - 08:15 PM

Minnie. I am saying this with a lot of love in my heart. Please please please stop agonising over everything with your daughter. I know from experience that overanalyzing everything with subsequent children only causes you to not enjoy their babyhood as much as you could.

#21 robhat

Posted 31 July 2019 - 08:33 PM

If you have a child who has ASD I can understand why you'd worry, but baby milestones are very hit and miss. They are a good guideline, but there is always a wide variety.

My eldest got teeth at 4 months while her friend had none until 12 months. She crawled late (11 months), walked late (15 months) but then started reading at 3.

If your baby is 6 months and not doing the things the milestones suggest, don't panic. It's kind of an average. There will be kids who did that stuff at 4 or 5 months and some won't do it until 8 or 9 months. Give her a few more months yet.

#22 Minnie80

Posted 31 July 2019 - 08:49 PM

View PostI, on 31 July 2019 - 08:15 PM, said:

Minnie. I am saying this with a lot of love in my heart. Please please please stop agonising over everything with your daughter. I know from experience that overanalyzing everything with subsequent children only causes you to not enjoy their babyhood as much as you could.

Look I agree with you 100 %. But it is easier said then done. My son is mildly autistic, to the point that we have been asked to reassess him. However, he is not a typical child and we have had many challenges. The therapy is insanely expensive. And the emotional toll of seeing your kid struggling with basic things. So, Yes I am worried that we are having another ASD child on our hands. I don't know how we will cope at all.
My daughter has not rolled, doesn't know her name and hasn't babbled. I know she is only 6 months, buy my ASD son was already babbling up a storm by 5 months. What are we facing here, a more severe form of ASD or just a quiet child.
I know I am driving people crazy, but how can I not obsess. Yes, there is nothing I can do about it, but my heart still sinks every time there is a delay. People think I am behaving like this because I am anxious. Maybe anxiety is playing a part, but my worries are more practical. How will we cope mentally and financially?
I'm sorry I offloaded like this. But yesterday I talked to my therapist and I said I know I am driving everyone crazy, but I don't know how I cannot worry.
Anyway, back to my question. I am relieved that this is more of 1 year milestone. Every site I read said 4 to 7 months. With 6 months being the average.

#23 mayahlb

Posted 31 July 2019 - 09:13 PM

But Minnie at this point what is stressing about it doing? What benefit is it having? What can you do if you know she is autistic now that will change what you are doing? The answer is nothing. She’s too younger and there are too many variables in her development at this point.

I get it, I really do. We’ve struggled a lot with our older child and his diagnosis. My younger isn’t NT either (not asd). But if there is one thing I would say to you as a parent, stressing about it was never helpful. All it did was cause my mental health to deteriorate. Your child is so very very young yet. Even if ASD is a factor, there is very very little you can do at this point. And there is nothing you can do to change if she is autistic or not. It will be what it will be. But by working on your stress and anxiety over it, you will be better able to cope with the future of your child. I get it, I really do. But from one parent to another of a child with asd, I regret the anxiety and stress I had about my younger child. I wish I spent more time enjoying him, when at this point most of my memories of him as a baby (he’s 9 now) are stress and a grey haze of vague memories. I regret that sincerely.

Edited by mayahlb, 31 July 2019 - 09:15 PM.


#24 I'mBeachedAs

Posted 01 August 2019 - 06:53 AM

View PostMinnie80, on 31 July 2019 - 08:49 PM, said:



Look I agree with you 100 %. But it is easier said then done. My son is mildly autistic, to the point that we have been asked to reassess him. However, he is not a typical child and we have had many challenges. The therapy is insanely expensive. And the emotional toll of seeing your kid struggling with basic things. So, Yes I am worried that we are having another ASD child on our hands. I don't know how we will cope at all.
My daughter has not rolled, doesn't know her name and hasn't babbled. I know she is only 6 months, buy my ASD son was already babbling up a storm by 5 months. What are we facing here, a more severe form of ASD or just a quiet child.
I know I am driving people crazy, but how can I not obsess. Yes, there is nothing I can do about it, but my heart still sinks every time there is a delay. People think I am behaving like this because I am anxious. Maybe anxiety is playing a part, but my worries are more practical. How will we cope mentally and financially?
I'm sorry I offloaded like this. But yesterday I talked to my therapist and I said I know I am driving everyone crazy, but I don't know how I cannot worry.
Anyway, back to my question. I am relieved that this is more of 1 year milestone. Every site I read said 4 to 7 months. With 6 months being the average.

You're not driving me crazy. I just worry that you're not enjoying your baby and instead stressing about things you can't change at this point. Have you heard what they say about worries? Focus on the things you have control over and try not to worry about things you can't control.

#25 newmumandexcited

Posted 01 August 2019 - 01:14 PM

I have three sons and with my first, I was beside myself with anxiety about autism. I couldn’t function. I think you should call this what this is - anxiety that you are projecting. I’ve been there but can you possibly get some help for that first? She’s six months - you can’t know at this point anyway.




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