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alcohol at junior sport


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Poll: alcohol at junior sport (323 member(s) have cast votes)

Is there any place for BYO alcohol at a junior sport break-up

  1. Yes (143 votes [44.27%])

    Percentage of vote: 44.27%

  2. No (180 votes [55.73%])

    Percentage of vote: 55.73%

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#1 WTFJerk

Posted 02 August 2019 - 11:25 AM

I've deliberately kept this poll to Yes or No.

Children's sport end-of-season break-up party.  Held at the training ground.  High level of parental involvement in getting the sport to go ahead.

Should parents be allowed to BYO or should it be an alcohol-free event?

#2 seayork2002

Posted 02 August 2019 - 11:31 AM

I am not sure I have an opinion either way, DH and I would not drink but I can't say it would bother us if we saw others doing it really.

No I don't think the event has to have alcohol but see it has to be beaned either.

I would not advertise BYO and just leave it up to everyone what they bring

#3 hills mum bec

Posted 02 August 2019 - 11:33 AM

Our end of season presentations are held at the sport's clubrooms that has a bar so alcohol is available to purchase at all the presentations we have been to.  I don't have a problem with it and the sale of alcohol at the bar raises a lot of money for the club.

#4 can'tstayaway

Posted 02 August 2019 - 11:36 AM

I don’t often drink at sporting events (usually driving) but I have no issue with others drinking so long as it’s not messy, obnoxious, aiming to get hammered drinking.

#5 Soontobegran

Posted 02 August 2019 - 11:42 AM

I don't have a yes or no though.

I have seen it work just fine and have seen it turn into a sh*t fight of drunken idiots who embarrassed and traumatised the children.

My default would be no probably......I figure that most people can survive a couple of hours without alcohol but the damage done by the behaviours we all saw was forever.

#6 Riotproof

Posted 02 August 2019 - 11:44 AM

What time is the party?

#7 Dadto2

Posted 02 August 2019 - 11:45 AM

View PostSoontobegran, on 02 August 2019 - 11:42 AM, said:

I don't have a yes or no though.

I have seen it work just fine and have seen it turn into a sh*t fight of drunken idiots who embarrassed and traumatised the children.

My default would be no probably......I figure that most people can survive a couple of hours without alcohol but the damage done by the behaviours we all saw was forever.

I'd say yes, if people could refrain from turning it into a sh*t fight. But that's a big if! So probably no.

#8 Expelliarmus

Posted 02 August 2019 - 11:47 AM

I see a big difference between BYO and sold by the club at the bar. I am in favour of purchase at bar but not byo because if it’s sold there are rules around that which vanish with byo making it more risky.

Edited by Expelliarmus, 02 August 2019 - 01:11 PM.


#9 bikingbubs

Posted 02 August 2019 - 11:49 AM

At an end of season break up - yes

At a week to week game - no

#10 Lucrezia Borgia

Posted 02 August 2019 - 11:51 AM

i voted yes, but i agree with RP that it would depend on the time - and other things.

if it’s a party after a 10 am match then i think everyone could get by without the booze - a mobile coffee van might be nice? if it’s 5 pm on a saturday afternoon...yeh why not? drinking isn’t compulsory.


#11 purplekitty

Posted 02 August 2019 - 11:57 AM

Can we have an option 'under certain conditions' ?

#12 Kreme

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:01 PM

I need a “no opinion” button.

My daughter has been playing and now umpiring netball on a Friday night for the past 4 years and I may have occasionally mentioned that alcohol would make the experience more enjoyable, however alcohol is banned at the courts so hot chocolate has to suffice.

I wouldn’t care either way.

Edited by Kreme, 02 August 2019 - 12:02 PM.


#13 Oriental lily

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:04 PM

I have no problem with it . You need to know the dynamics of the group though . If there are a couple of known "dills' who might get messy then might be better to be a dry event . But a bunch of normally respond in ll e adults who might like to unwind with a couple of  drinks over a couple of hours I see it as pretty average thing to do in Australian culture . If that should be in Australian culture is another debate .

#14 JomoMum

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:07 PM

Hmm. What’s the event? Age of children?

Ours is a family fun day with rides, jumping castles etc at the clubs home ground oval. No alcohol facilities.

I would expect it to be a no alcohol event with the age of kids ranging from 5-8. So high level of parental involvement and supervision required.

At a larger sporting ground with adequate bar facilities and older aged children, probably yes.

#15 cardamom

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:25 PM

Possibly flame-worthy:

I voted no, but I admit that I can be a bit wowser-ish. Growing up in the country with binge-drinking/functional alcoholic parents in a culture where fun without alcohol is unfathomable has coloured my view significantly.

If the event is being held at a club or venue and alcohol is available for purchase over the bar that feels like less of a problem (though still seems unnecessary). But if it's a child-oriented community event and people are BYO-ing a 6-pack, I'm not a fan.

I just don't think alcohol needs to be as ever-present as it is in Australian culture and where there are opportunities to challenge that, we should. Junior sport seems like a great space to embed some health promoting policies and support good role modelling :shrug:

#16 shoonic

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:26 PM

If it’s a combine junior and senior sports break up then yes. But it’s just a junior event then the liquor license states no alcohol to be served or byo

#17 ~J_WTF~

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:27 PM

People BYO even if they arent allowed.

They will bring it in water bottles or pre mixed in coke or whatever their mixer is.

I think it’s better to try and monitor it someone personally.

#18 28 Barbary Lane

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:28 PM

View PostKreme, on 02 August 2019 - 12:01 PM, said:

I need a “no opinion” button.

My daughter has been playing and now umpiring netball on a Friday night for the past 4 years and I may have occasionally mentioned that alcohol would make the experience more enjoyable, however alcohol is banned at the courts so hot chocolate has to suffice.

I wouldn’t care either way.
Lol think am the same. Just because I wouldn’t drink, doesn’t mean it would bother me if it was there. I would imagine if people were driving or had things to do after, most would be unlikely to drink much anyway.

#19 Mollycoddle

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:29 PM

See I don't see it as having to do with whether people will get silly or not at the actual event.  I'm looking at the broader picture ie. parents in general, rightly so, want to have control over whether, when and where their kids are exposed to alcohol and it might be exclusionary toward some families if it were blanket permitted at this sort of event.  A kid-focused event should be just that.  Grog being present means some people may not feel comfortable bringing their kids and the event IS actually for the kids, not the adults.  I feel the same about kids' birthday parties, which came up also in another recent thread.

Every year we manage to have our junior rugby league afternoon presentation in a licensed club yet in a function room away from the bar, in 8 years I've never seen anyone bring a drink into the room though there's nothing stopping them.  It's just implicit that it's not the done thing and this is arguably the most bogan sport, in the most bogan area of our town (nothing wrong with us bogans, just using the word to demonstrate we're an easygoing bunch).

Get by without it for a few hours and save your booze-up for afterwards, in your own private time and space.

Edited by Mollycoddle, 02 August 2019 - 01:48 PM.


#20 Riotproof

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:38 PM

View Postcardamom, on 02 August 2019 - 12:25 PM, said:

Possibly flame-worthy:

I voted no, but I admit that I can be a bit wowser-ish. Growing up in the country with binge-drinking/functional alcoholic parents in a culture where fun without alcohol is unfathomable has coloured my view significantly.

If the event is being held at a club or venue and alcohol is available for purchase over the bar that feels like less of a problem (though still seems unnecessary). But if it's a child-oriented community event and people are BYO-ing a 6-pack, I'm not a fan.

I just don't think alcohol needs to be as ever-present as it is in Australian culture and where there are opportunities to challenge that, we should. Junior sport seems like a great space to embed some health promoting policies and support good role modelling :shrug:

I do agree with you.

But with the preponderance of reusable drinking vessels, people will simply byo anyway. Apparently they do it even at the movies.

#21 Mollycoddle

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:40 PM

View Post~J_WTF~, on 02 August 2019 - 12:27 PM, said:

People BYO even if they arent allowed.

They will bring it in water bottles or pre mixed in coke or whatever their mixer is.

I think it’s better to try and monitor it someone personally.

As someone has been a frequent proponent of the above on many occasions in venues where alcohol prices are prohibitive (NRL, I'm looking at you), I know that people who do this generally make damn sure to be surreptitious enough not to make it obvious.  I'm not so naive to think people may not suspect I might be being helped along a bit but I'm hardly going to whip out the bottle in full view of everyone if I've gone to all the effort of concealing it to smuggle it in.

Edited by Mollycoddle, 02 August 2019 - 12:48 PM.


#22 Bethlehem Babe

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:40 PM

My default is no.
Possible that club will be liable if something happens.
Too hard to control byo.

#23 Mollycoddle

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:48 PM

View PostRiotproof, on 02 August 2019 - 12:38 PM, said:

I do agree with you.

But with the preponderance of reusable drinking vessels, people will simply byo anyway. Apparently they do it even at the movies.

That isn't about people being alcoholics and not being able to go without even for a few hours.  It's about the exorbitant, unreasonable prices of an alcoholic beverage at certain events.  At our local NRL games you're looking at $13 for a single pre-mixed can of vodka or bourbon.

#24 Holidayromp

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:49 PM

If the club has expected (and got) a high level of parental involvement over the season then yes.  But limit the bar open time.

If byo - if the event is only a couple of hours long I don’t see a problem

However if it’s going to be a long event it’s going to be either way - parents have a good time and only have one or two or you will get the seasoned drinkers spoiling it for the rest.

The only way for the best of both worlds is to have a bar but don’t have it open the whole time.   Plus trialling having alcohol there.

This is a great money making opportunity and if done well could be a great money making venture whilst keeping the drinkers happy.

AFM Yes I drink but not sure if I would do it in this instance.

#25 TheGreenSheep

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:53 PM

I voted yes.
Treat adults like adults until they prove otherwise IMO.
It can also role model responsible drinking behaviour as well. Not all people who drink do it to the extreme.




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