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alcohol at junior sport


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Poll: alcohol at junior sport (323 member(s) have cast votes)

Is there any place for BYO alcohol at a junior sport break-up

  1. Yes (143 votes [44.27%])

    Percentage of vote: 44.27%

  2. No (180 votes [55.73%])

    Percentage of vote: 55.73%

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#26 seayork2002

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:59 PM

View PostMollycoddle, on 02 August 2019 - 12:29 PM, said:

See I don't see it as having to do with whether people will get silly or not at the actual event.  I'm looking at the broader picture ie. parents in general, rightly so, want to have control over whether, when and where their kids are exposed to alcohol and it might be exclusionary toward some families if it were blanket permitted at this sort of event.  A kid-focused event should be just that.  Grog being present means some people may not feel comfortable bringing their kids and the event IS actually for the kids, not the adults.  I feel the same about kids' birthday parties, which came up also in another recent thread.

Every year we manage to have our junior rugby league afternoon presentation in a licensed club yet in a function room away from the bar, in 8 years I've never seen anyone bring a drink into the room though there's nothing stopping them.  It's just implicit that it's not the done thing and this is arguably the most bogan sport, in the most bogan area of our town.

Get by without it for a few hours and save your booze-up for afterwards, in your own private time and space.

There is only so much hiding of things or ideas we can do with kids.

Not sure how hiding it helps really

#27 TrixieBelden

Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:59 PM

I can see the value in having drinks for sale if fundraising supports the club I guess.

My preference would be no as I think we could do with a bit more separation of the sporting and drinking cultures in Australia. I think part of responsible drinking is having plenty of events that are entirely alcohol-free.

#28 Lesley225

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:02 PM

I only every drink occasionally and I just don't understand the need to always have alcohol at a venue, that people can't have a good time without it.  And it worries me about that message being given to the children.  And it's a children's sport get together.  

I laugh about dry july.  I probably only have 2-3 drinks a year so it could be dry whatever for me.

#29 Hypnic Jerk

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:04 PM

View Postpurplekitty, on 02 August 2019 - 11:57 AM, said:

Can we have an option 'under certain conditions' ?

No you can't.

No room for fence sitters on this boat.

#30 annodam

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:04 PM

Look, I don't drink but I have no issues with others bringing a bottle of wine.
As it stands at our Club, we have drinks at Bar prices & people usually buy from there, so there is no BYO, if you know what I mean...

#31 qak

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:07 PM

I'm always happy to have a drink!

AT a training ground ... I'd be wondering, if it was council property, whether alcohol is allowed there?

#32 cardamom

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:08 PM

View PostRiotproof, on 02 August 2019 - 12:38 PM, said:

I do agree with you.

But with the preponderance of reusable drinking vessels, people will simply byo anyway. Apparently they do it even at the movies.

See, whether or not people actually consume alcohol at the event isn't the crux of the issue for me - I feel it's more about the visibility of alcohol consumption, the normalisation of it as part of our culture, and the message that sends to children.

If people are BYO-ing in inconspicuous vessels, then at least a nominally-if-not-actually dry event still has the benefit of sending a particular message to families and reducing the visibility/normalisation of alcohol consumption, if not the consumption itself.

Don't know if that makes sense. Like I said, I'm a wowser so my view is a bit skewed. Too many nights spent schlepping my paralytically drunk parents to the hospital as a teen.

#33 Etta

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:15 PM

View Postseayork2002, on 02 August 2019 - 12:59 PM, said:

There is only so much hiding of things or ideas we can do with kids.

Not sure how hiding it helps really

I am no for this one. It is not hiding - it is openly displaying that adults can attend an event and have a good time without having a drink.

#34 Hypnic Jerk

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:17 PM

View PostRiotproof, on 02 August 2019 - 11:44 AM, said:

What time is the party?

View PostJomoMum, on 02 August 2019 - 12:07 PM, said:

Hmm. What’s the event? Age of children?

Ours is a family fun day with rides, jumping castles etc at the clubs home ground oval. No alcohol facilities.

I would expect it to be a no alcohol event with the age of kids ranging from 5-8. So high level of parental involvement and supervision required.

At a larger sporting ground with adequate bar facilities and older aged children, probably yes.

6pm, probably till about 8.  Around 20 kids aged from 6-16


View Postcardamom, on 02 August 2019 - 12:25 PM, said:

Possibly flame-worthy:

I voted no, but I admit that I can be a bit wowser-ish. Growing up in the country with binge-drinking/functional alcoholic parents in a culture where fun without alcohol is unfathomable has coloured my view significantly.

If the event is being held at a club or venue and alcohol is available for purchase over the bar that feels like less of a problem (though still seems unnecessary). But if it's a child-oriented community event and people are BYO-ing a 6-pack, I'm not a fan.

I just don't think alcohol needs to be as ever-present as it is in Australian culture and where there are opportunities to challenge that, we should. Junior sport seems like a great space to embed some health promoting policies and support good role modelling :shrug:

This is where I am coming from.

Full disclosure:  I've just made up a base for mulled wine to take along.  I'm a little excited, it's nice to make up something special.  But then the other half of my brain is thinking the same as Cardamom.

More disclosure:  one day DD was totally giving me the sh*ts before a twilight event.  I poured a glass of wine but it was time to leave, my visitor poured it into a keep-cup.  It was half a glass but it was naughty and helped me survive DD.

#35 Dianalynch

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:20 PM

We have a problem with alcohol in this country, I think it would be okay in a European country where the culture is more around a drink or two and everyone calls it quits, but here? I agree with a pp we need to start to separate sport from drinking in this country.

Does alcohol really need to be at every single event? A family member was telling me how parents were getting p*ssed at their kid's primary school carols night. Seriously, what the **** is wrong with us? School had to ban alcohol the next year.

#36 Pip_longstockings

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:21 PM

I voted yes but I had in my mind a preconceived idea of an afternoon BBQ which honors the kids but also the contribution of the parents who put so much time into running kids sports. I see it as a way to thank those that help and foster the community around the club. I know alcohol is not required for this to happen but I am only envisaging a glass of wine or two and a few beers, not a bunch of adults getting rip roaring drunk and out of control. If that was the expected outcome I would say no alcohol but in my experience this is not what happens, adults can be responsible drinkers.

#37 Lucrezia Bauble

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:26 PM

View PostDianalynch, on 02 August 2019 - 01:20 PM, said:

We have a problem with alcohol in this country, I think it would be okay in a European country where the culture is more around a drink or two and everyone calls it quits, but here? I agree with a pp we need to start to separate sport from drinking in this country.

Does alcohol really need to be at every single event? A family member was telling me how parents were getting p*ssed at their kid's primary school carols night. Seriously, what the **** is wrong with us? School had to ban alcohol the next year.

yes, all this is true.

our yearly “welcome back to school”  evening picnic in the school grounds event is on  a friday night, in summer....a nice prosecco might go down well but it’s a school event, they have made it alcohol free and that’s perfectly acceptable and understandable. we all still go. we all have a good time. we are all capable of this!

the OP asked a question - “is it ok for parents to byo at an end of season party” - i voted yes. had she asked “is it acceptable for the team managers to ban alcohol at an end of season party” i would have also voted yes. i drink, i like it - at such an event if alcohol was available i would have a glass. but equally, if it wasn’t, i’d still go and have fun.

Edited by Lucrezia Borgia, 02 August 2019 - 01:28 PM.


#38 Riotproof

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:28 PM

View PostMollycoddle, on 02 August 2019 - 12:48 PM, said:



That isn't about people being alcoholics and not being able to go without even for a few hours.  It's about the exorbitant, unreasonable prices of an alcoholic beverage at certain events.  At our local NRL games you're looking at $13 for a single pre-mixed can of vodka or bourbon.

I have no doubt. I’m just saying people are used to being sneaky with it.

#39 No Drama Please

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:39 PM

View PostDianalynch, on 02 August 2019 - 01:20 PM, said:

We have a problem with alcohol in this country, I think it would be okay in a European country where the culture is more around a drink or two and everyone calls it quits, but here? I agree with a pp we need to start to separate sport from drinking in this country.
Why do we have such a problem with alcohol here, and need lock out laws, no drinking in public places etc, while in Europe you can buy alcohol and drink it anywhere, and they don’t have the same problems?

Genuine question, I’ve looked at a few different ways but couldn’t come up with anything. I used to think maybe it was a hangover from the 6 o’clock closing days but they were a while ago now!

#40 lalalove

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:42 PM

I voted no.

Junior sport = just not necessary.

I don't understand why there is such a need to have alcohol present at so many events - particularly those centred around children. Kids birthday parties are another one that comes to mind.

My experience is that local adult sporting clubs have such a strong association with drinking, it seems to be just the accepted norm to have a few drinks watching the game, players getting hammered afterwards. It's such a shame. Sad to think this is now infiltrating in to kids' sports.

Don't get me wrong - I love a drink. But my view point has changed from accepting alcohol as a standard part of life to thinking it is not really all it is cracked up to be.

Our kids do not need to think that alcohol is okay and/or necessary at every social event.

#41 bakesgirls

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:45 PM

I voted no. I really think this country has a bad attitude toward drinking and a culture that pushes alcohol for every event. Alcohol is not harmless. It impacts lives, (generally speaking) negatively everyday. This country does not foster a responsible attitude towards drinking for kids, and adults, to see and learn from (generally speaking). I’ve lost count of the number of functions I’ve been to where if I’m not drinking, I’m questioned as to why, as though I’m unusual for not feeling to need to nurse a drink all night. Then there’s the questions about if I’m designated driver, or am I unwell, pregnant, ‘what’s wrong with you’, and so on.

I know my opinion here may get me flamed, but I personally think if you can’t be at a kids event for a few hours and not drink you may need to consider if you have an issue.

#42 born.a.girl

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:47 PM

I'm about to vote yes, now that I know the time.


I'd also prefer to see alcohol being sold as a fundraiser, than BYO, although I understand why people do.

#43 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:50 PM

View Post~J_WTF~, on 02 August 2019 - 12:27 PM, said:

People BYO even if they arent allowed.

They will bring it in water bottles or pre mixed in coke or whatever their mixer is.

I think it’s better to try and monitor it someone personally.

Adults do this? It’s the sort of thing that people did when underage or as a uni student who couldn’t afford to buy drinks.

#44 born.a.girl

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:51 PM

View Postbakesgirls, on 02 August 2019 - 01:45 PM, said:

I voted no. I really think this country has a bad attitude toward drinking and a culture that pushes alcohol for every event. Alcohol is not harmless. It impacts lives, (generally speaking) negatively everyday. This country does not foster a responsible attitude towards drinking for kids, and adults, to see and learn from (generally speaking). I’ve lost count of the number of functions I’ve been to where if I’m not drinking, I’m questioned as to why, as though I’m unusual for not feeling to need to nurse a drink all night. Then there’s the questions about if I’m designated driver, or am I unwell, pregnant, ‘what’s wrong with you’, and so on.

I know my opinion here may get me flamed, but I personally think if you can’t be at a kids event for a few hours and not drink you may need to consider if you have an issue.

Although I voted yes, I completely agree with your comments.

If it had been once a week, I'd have said no, and if it had been lunchtime I'd have said no.


Interesting, amongst twenty-somethings, it's not in the least bit worthy of comment that someone chooses to not drink.  Seems to me that the zero alcohol levels required on P plates have changed the thinking around 'needing' to drink at parties. So many there will be driving, so not even one drink, that no one much seems to take any notice any more. When I asked my daughter (she and bf both 27) about it, she thought it was an odd question, that anyone would care whether or not she was drinking.

#45 CallMeFeral

Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:56 PM

View PostWTFJerk, on 02 August 2019 - 01:17 PM, said:

6pm, probably till about 8.  Around 20 kids aged from 6-16

At that time of night I think alcohol allowed would be appropriate.

But if it isn't, please send your mulled wine base to me and I will make sure it's well looked after  :p

View PostDianalynch, on 02 August 2019 - 01:20 PM, said:

Does alcohol really need to be at every single event?

View Postbakesgirls, on 02 August 2019 - 01:45 PM, said:

but I personally think if you can’t be at a kids event for a few hours and not drink you may need to consider if you have an issue.

I don't really understand these posts. Saying that alcohol would be fine at an even is not saying alcohol NEEDS to be at every single event, nor is it saying that was CAN'T be at a kids event without it.

It's just saying that it's nice to have, so is there a reason to ban it. That could be said for anything - if I asked should I serve meat at my event because some of my guests are vegetarian? It would be ridiculous for the answers to be "does meat really need to be at every single event? if you can't be at an event without meat you may need to consider if you have an issue...". In the end, meat dishes are something lots of people enjoy and preferring to have them there is not a sign of meat addiction or 24/7 meat gorging.

Yes, with alcohol there are more potential downsides, so that's the issue. But not the wanting it there in the first place.

#46 WaitForMe

Posted 02 August 2019 - 02:01 PM

View Post28 Barbary Lane, on 02 August 2019 - 01:39 PM, said:

Why do we have such a problem with alcohol here, and need lock out laws, no drinking in public places etc, while in Europe you can buy alcohol and drink it anywhere, and they don’t have the same problems?

Genuine question, I’ve looked at a few different ways but couldn’t come up with anything. I used to think maybe it was a hangover from the 6 o’clock closing days but they were a while ago now!

I'm not any kind of expert but I suspect it is partly the wealth and power of the alcohol industry here.

Whereas in some parts of Europe, it is probably well and truly embedded as a way of life to drink "responsibly", and they do this in spite of the alcohol industry.

Or perhaps the industry is just different given it consists predominantly of local wine production.

Its not all Europe that is like this in any case. Russia, I've heard they'll drink vodka on the way to work, and it is most definitely a problem.

#47 Hollycoddle

Posted 02 August 2019 - 02:07 PM

View PostTheGreenSheep, on 02 August 2019 - 12:53 PM, said:

It can also role model responsible drinking behaviour as well.

That's an old trope.  The evidence clearly points to the fact that the earlier and more frequently kids are exposed to alcohol, the earlier they will start drinking themselves.

View Post22Fruitmincepies, on 02 August 2019 - 01:50 PM, said:

Adults do this? It’s the sort of thing that people did when underage or as a uni student who couldn’t afford to buy drinks.

I'm on a good salary and I can't afford to pay up to $15 for a 1.5 standard drink in the form of a can of pre-mixed spirits.  I used to sneak a 6-pack into the football in the pockets of a big jacket or wrapped in a blanket in my bag even up to a few years ago but now security make you drag literally everything out of your bag and even lift up your jacket and shake it out.  I'm not brave enough now, I don't know if they would just take the alcohol, kick you out for the day or ban you for even longer.

I have cut back now since they cut off the bus from the local club near my house I drive to the closest main bus station and bus it into the stadium and vice versa on the way out so I only have 2 cans max now if any.

Edited by Mollycoddle, 02 August 2019 - 02:12 PM.


#48 -Emissary-

Posted 02 August 2019 - 02:16 PM

I don’t like drinking in front of DS. Not because I’m naive and think that he will never touch alcohol but because I don’t feel like I need to role model that drinking is an healthy acceptable drink that can be consumed frequently even if done responsibly.

It isn’t really.

I would prefer no BYO but wouldn’t complain if there was.

#49 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 02 August 2019 - 02:16 PM

View Post22Fruitmincepies, on 02 August 2019 - 01:50 PM, said:



Adults do this? It’s the sort of thing that people did when underage or as a uni student who couldn’t afford to buy drinks.

Yes they do.

I will admit to doing it recently :lol: I drink vodka - easy to hide in a water bottle. I just buy coke or OJ and pour my alcohol in.

ETA not at a kids event though. If there is alcohol supplied I might have one but if not I wouldn’t bother smuggling!!

Edited by ~J_WTF~, 02 August 2019 - 02:21 PM.


#50 Hollycoddle

Posted 02 August 2019 - 02:21 PM

View PostCallMeFeral, on 02 August 2019 - 01:56 PM, said:

Yes, with alcohol there are more potential downsides, so that's the issue. But not the wanting it there in the first place.

And therein lies the rub.  There isn't any evidence pointing to the idea that meat might cause lifelong destructive damage to people the earlier they are exposed to it.  I don't have any good reason to want to control the circumstances around my children's exposure to meat, whereas with alcohol I feel that I do (maybe not me personally but I feel all parents should have that right).  Perhaps not the best analogy.

Edited by Mollycoddle, 02 August 2019 - 02:25 PM.





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