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alcohol at junior sport


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Poll: alcohol at junior sport (323 member(s) have cast votes)

Is there any place for BYO alcohol at a junior sport break-up

  1. Yes (143 votes [44.27%])

    Percentage of vote: 44.27%

  2. No (180 votes [55.73%])

    Percentage of vote: 55.73%

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#51 Lucrezia Borgia

Posted 02 August 2019 - 02:22 PM

my niece was recently stocking up on those squeezy yoghurt pouches - loved by toddlers everywhere. i queried why...? music festival - good for “storing” vodka apparently. not sure how this works...vodka and yoghurt does not appeal...maybe they eat the yoghurt, rinse out the pouch, then put the vodka in....


#52 ~J_WTF~

Posted 02 August 2019 - 02:24 PM

Yep they eat the yoghurt or just squeeze it out.

#53 Imaginary friend

Posted 02 August 2019 - 02:32 PM

I vote yes.

The event isn't just for kids, it is for parents who have been involved and volunteers all season.

Nobody  has to drink but I don't see a reason for banning it and think it perfectly ok to have at such an event.

#54 opethmum

Posted 02 August 2019 - 02:34 PM

I voted no, the reason why is that there will be a parent who will over do it and having a child put at risk by drunk drivers and in the car park is not good enough. The risk of too many drunk drivers at the conclusion of the event is way too high.

The children's safety to and from the event and your club could be up for a law suit if they fail to monitor adequately drinkers.

I think to have byo is irresponsible and you may run the risk of being in violation of liquor laws and the consumption of alcohol in a public space. You can not control the content of alcohol in the drink and adults who have a problem with alcohol may over do it and the risk of broken bottles in the training field and the car park may happen and potentially injure players on the field.

If you want to drink have it elsewhere in a licensed premises and where RSA applies and people can get taxis home and children aren't potentially exposed to drunk drivers.

I think if my club was to do this I would opt out because my children do not deserve to be constantly bombarded with alcohol. You can celebrate major things without the need for alcohol.

#55 Imaginary friend

Posted 02 August 2019 - 02:40 PM

Hmm, that seems an exaggeration to me and not my experience of many years being involved in sports clubs.

I don't see any drunk drivers at the end of regular events like football games, netball games, tennis games - all of which, where I live,  have licenced  bar open every week.

Not sure why this  event would be any different.

Of course we are assuming the event is within liquor laws and has relevant licence or is in public place that it is ok to BYO - I took that as a given with the question.

Not is it ok, when the park is a designated dry zone or something.

#56 DirtyStreetPie

Posted 02 August 2019 - 02:52 PM

Alcohol at kids' events doesn't make sense to me. If the event is about the kids, then why supply beverages that those kids aren't even allowed to consume?

I hold the same view about birthday parties. Everything on the menu should be something that children are allowed to eat and drink - because it's their event.

I once attended a first birthday party where there was no special kid-oriented food (no cupcakes or cookies, etc). But the hosts did remember to supply an entire case of Chivas Regal. Lame.

#57 Mollycoddle

Posted 02 August 2019 - 03:06 PM

View Postseayork2002, on 02 August 2019 - 12:59 PM, said:

There is only so much hiding of things or ideas we can do with kids.

Not sure how hiding it helps really

It's not about hiding it.  At a child-focused event such as this it's about respecting other families' lifestyles and parenting choices.  For starters we're a multicultural society, there are families where their culture or religion prohibits them from drinking altogether and it makes them uncomfortable to be around alcohol.  If the Muslim child in my son's football team and his family would feel uncomfortable coming to his own presentation and afterparty because of the totally unnecessary presence of alcohol at a child-focused event then that, to me, is disrespectful on behalf of the team/club.  The drinkers can surely forgo a drink for the few hours the event will be going on.  An adult invited to an adult event where grog will be present?  Then that adult can go ahead and make a decision on whether to go or not, totally up to them.

Edited by Mollycoddle, 02 August 2019 - 03:40 PM.


#58 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 02 August 2019 - 03:12 PM

Birthday parties are the time I most need a bit of alcohol! Now that DD is 5 and no longer needs to be kept such a close eye on, but not yet ready for the drop and run, alcohol makes the noise much more bearable. I rarely drink, maybe one a month I’ll have one drink.

Anyway, I imagine that in the OP’s circumstances, some beer and wine would be brought along, no one would get drunk, and a good time had by all. But you just need one tool to spoil it for everyone.

#59 Meepy

Posted 02 August 2019 - 03:27 PM

I think it normalises the consumption of alcohol as a celebratory tool.  Kids are being shown that alcohol equals celebration, which is not necessarily true for all.

#60 can'tstayaway

Posted 02 August 2019 - 03:43 PM

View PostMollycoddle, on 02 August 2019 - 02:07 PM, said:

The evidence clearly points to the fact that the earlier and more frequently kids are exposed to alcohol, the earlier they will start drinking themselves.
There are studies that will show anything you want it to.

Even if it does mean they start drinking earlier, I’d rather my children follow the French fashion of having an occasional small glass of champagne for a celebration at age 14 than to delay drinking til age 21 and follow the binge drinking culture of Australia and the US.  

We don’t prohibit alcohol in our home or shield the children from its consumption. I know it’s only an anecdote but my teenagers choose not to drink alcohol at peer parties where it’s prevalent. They see their peers being sick and sorry afterwards and do not understand why they drink cheap crap to get into that state. They see alcohol as an accompaniment to meals and not to get blotto eg.  aperitif to stimulate digestion, wine/champagne with food, digestives after a rich meal.  We don’t encourage them to drink spirits but they are allowed some wine with a special meal.

Adults having some wine with a picnic after a long sports season?  Pfft. Barely rates on my radar of things to be concerned about.

As for why cater for parents at a junior sports event?  Many of those clubs would fall over without the support and efforts of parents contributing their time, money and energy. Even just the commitment of families taking their child to trainings and games should be celebrated. We could all go off and pursue solo activities but it doesn’t add to the fabric of these community organisations.

#61 MrsLexiK

Posted 02 August 2019 - 03:47 PM

View PostMollycoddle, on 02 August 2019 - 12:29 PM, said:


Every year we manage to have our junior rugby league afternoon presentation in a licensed club yet in a function room away from the bar, in 8 years I've never seen anyone bring a drink into the room though there's nothing stopping them.  It's just implicit that it's not the done thing and this is arguably the most bogan sport, in the most bogan area of our town (nothing wrong with us bogans, just using the word to demonstrate we're an easygoing bunch).

Get by without it for a few hours and save your booze-up for afterwards, in your own private time and space.
My DH wouldn’t think that it was the done thing. He would see team breakup at the pub and expect to be walking to and from the bar to the function room.

View Post28 Barbary Lane, on 02 August 2019 - 01:39 PM, said:


Why do we have such a problem with alcohol here, and need lock out laws, no drinking in public places etc, while in Europe you can buy alcohol and drink it anywhere, and they don’t have the same problems?

Genuine question, I’ve looked at a few different ways but couldn’t come up with anything. I used to think maybe it was a hangover from the 6 o’clock closing days but they were a while ago now!
It’s hard isn’t it. I grew up where I could have alcohol from a younger age (supervised) and it wasn’t hidden I don’t drink much at all. I typically don’t even have 1 and drive. I never got disgusting drunk underage etc. I wasn’t a big drinker. Which goes against all the research. My DH was allowed the odd beer before 18 but really nothing like what I was allowed. His parents did drink much because they couldn’t afford to. It was reserved for special occasions and sunny days. He drinks much more then the recommended weekly amount from the health department. He wouldn’t see anything wrong with drinking a few beers at kids sports or school functions. He seems to think you “need” beer to watch footy/cricket etc whereas I don’t. If I go with my dad to the footy I occasionally -like once a season - may buy a wine otherwise I don’t (I usually have one of my kids with me and my dad drives). Whenever we go as a family DH would buy one a qrt. Great advertising! From CBU!

View Postborn.a.girl, on 02 August 2019 - 01:51 PM, said:


Interesting, amongst twenty-somethings, it's not in the least bit worthy of comment that someone chooses to not drink.  Seems to me that the zero alcohol levels required on P plates have changed the thinking around 'needing' to drink at parties. So many there will be driving, so not even one drink, that no one much seems to take any notice any more. When I asked my daughter (she and bf both 27) about it, she thought it was an odd question, that anyone would care whether or not she was drinking.
By the time I was 27 I was well off my p’s (and I think baby making so no drinking always raised an eyebrow). Perhaps times are changing and the youth are not caring about others behaviours around alcohol (unless bad) so they realise they don’t notice their behaviour either and they understand that they don’t have to drink. Whereas previously (like DH’s generation) you had to drink.

View PostImaginary friend, on 02 August 2019 - 02:40 PM, said:

Hmm, that seems an exaggeration to me and not my experience of many years being involved in sports clubs.

I don't see any drunk drivers at the end of regular events like football games, netball games, tennis games - all of which, where I live,  have licenced  bar open every week.

Not sure why this  event would be any different.

Of course we are assuming the event is within liquor laws and has relevant licence or is in public place that it is ok to BYO - I took that as a given with the question.

Not is it ok, when the park is a designated dry zone or something.
They might not be drunk but I bet a lot are over .05 and they don’t realise.

#62 seayork2002

Posted 02 August 2019 - 04:12 PM

View PostMollycoddle, on 02 August 2019 - 03:06 PM, said:

It's not about hiding it.  At a child-focused event such as this it's about respecting other families' lifestyles and parenting choices.  For starters we're a multicultural society, there are families where their culture or religion prohibits them from drinking altogether and it makes them uncomfortable to be around alcohol.  If the Muslim child in my son's football team and his family would feel uncomfortable coming to his own presentation and afterparty because of the totally unnecessary presence of alcohol at a child-focused event then that, to me, is disrespectful on behalf of the team/club.  The drinkers can surely forgo a drink for the few hours the event will be going on.  An adult invited to an adult event where grog will be present?  Then that adult can go ahead and make a decision on whether to go or not, totally up to them.

I have been to events held by Muslims that have alcohol, sure they don't drink it (well some do) but it is around, Did the Muslims at your event tell you they were uncomfortable? or the people running the event?

#63 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 02 August 2019 - 04:23 PM

Our club presentation night (junior and senior teams) will be held at a, licensed club. Alcohol will be available. Haven't heard any complaints from the junior teams parents/carers.

Just because alcohol is available doesn't mean it has to be consumed.

View PostMeepy, on 02 August 2019 - 03:27 PM, said:

I think it normalises the consumption of alcohol as a celebratory tool.  Kids are being shown that alcohol equals celebration, which is not necessarily true for all.
but often, that is when alcohol is consumed, when you are celebrating?

Toasts are made, winners are sprayed with champagne, boat launches are marked with a smashed bottle of bubblies, etc.

Sure, you don't have to use alcohol, but alcohol has been used in celebrations for centuries, even millenium!

#64 born.a.girl

Posted 02 August 2019 - 04:23 PM

I grew up with a beer drinking alcoholic for a father, dead at 67 from alcoholism.

None of his six kids drink beer with any enthusiasm. A few have the odd beer.  Three of us never drink beer.

#65 Mollycoddle

Posted 02 August 2019 - 04:38 PM

View Postseayork2002, on 02 August 2019 - 04:12 PM, said:

I have been to events held by Muslims that have alcohol, sure they don't drink it (well some do) but it is around, Did the Muslims at your event tell you they were uncomfortable? or the people running the event?

I was just using that as an example.  It could apply to any family for whatever reason they may be uncomfortable with alcohol there. I don't think it even needs to be delved into, just easier to make it totally alcohol-free than make assumptions and possibly put pressure on by trying to to suss out where all the parents stand on the issue.  Is it such a hard thing to get your head around that some people don't want their little kids running around where adults are drinking?  I'm 100% OK with it personally, hell I'd be first at the bar but I can see the point of view of others.

Edited by Mollycoddle, 02 August 2019 - 08:16 PM.


#66 PrincessPeach

Posted 02 August 2019 - 04:38 PM

BYO -  no, available for purchase, go for it.

besides that, for a lot of councils alcohol cannot be consumed in public places unless the venue is licensed- your sporting grounds would be considered public places.

#67 Mollycoddle

Posted 02 August 2019 - 04:39 PM

View PostYodaTheWrinkledOne, on 02 August 2019 - 04:23 PM, said:


Toasts are made, winners are sprayed with champagne, boat launches are marked with a smashed bottle of bubblies, etc.


Never seen any of that happen at a kids' sporting event.  Time and a place and all that...

#68 seayork2002

Posted 02 August 2019 - 04:40 PM

View PostMollycoddle, on 02 August 2019 - 04:38 PM, said:

I was just using that as an example.  It could apply to any family for whatever reason they may be uncomfortable with alcohol there.  Is it such a hard thing to get your head around that some people don't want their little kids running around where adults are drinking?  I'm 100% OK with it, hell I'd be first at the bar but I can see the point of view of others.

Yeah sorry I just keep on hearing assumptions made from people about other groups assumed to be thinking things, but they have never been asked it is just assumed.

#69 CallMeFeral

Posted 02 August 2019 - 05:19 PM

View PostMollycoddle, on 02 August 2019 - 02:21 PM, said:

And therein lies the rub.  There isn't any evidence pointing to the idea that meat might cause lifelong destructive damage to people the earlier they are exposed to it.  I don't have any good reason to want to control the circumstances around my children's exposure to meat, whereas with alcohol I feel that I do (maybe not me personally but I feel all parents should have that right).  Perhaps not the best analogy.

Yes that's the point I'm trying to make. The question needs a discussion around the costs vs benefits - it doesn't imply that people 'can't do without it for 3 hours' or 'need it at every event'. It's about "some people enjoy this - is there a downside of including it"

#70 WTF*A*Lot

Posted 02 August 2019 - 05:23 PM

Having been involved from club juniors through to representing NSW/Australia. I think it all depends on the parents. I have seen it work more often than I have seen it not work. In the younger years, the parents tended to not drink or if they did it was after most kids had left. The parents then hung around and had a few drinks to celebrate.

#71 Let-it-go

Posted 02 August 2019 - 05:32 PM

View PostLucrezia Borgia, on 02 August 2019 - 02:22 PM, said:

my niece was recently stocking up on those squeezy yoghurt pouches - loved by toddlers everywhere. i queried why...? music festival - good for “storing” vodka apparently. not sure how this works...vodka and yoghurt does not appeal...maybe they eat the yoghurt, rinse out the pouch, then put the vodka in....

Lol.....yes they wash them out.  Go to the loos an hour after a music festival begins....the floors are littered with squeezy yogurt pouches and condoms.

#72 28 Barbary Lane

Posted 02 August 2019 - 05:34 PM

Ew! A different world lol

#73 Jane Jetson

Posted 02 August 2019 - 05:40 PM

That kind of event and time of day I wouldn't really care, just like as with DD1's Year Six graduation party last year being held at the Labor Club and the parents could have drinks if we wanted. Lots did and I had two glasses of wine myself. Other times I won't, and I won't at all if I'm driving.

As long as nobody gets rotten or drives over 0.5 I really don't care. I have no doubt that it happens, but I've never seen anyone get rotten at a school event - and if they want to, as mentioned they'll smuggle it in or sneak off to another bar in the same venue and that's a recipe for trouble - as well as modelling sneakiness. I also don't care if such an event had an alcohol ban. I voted "yes" but if there'd been a "don't care" option I'd have taken that.

I don't see these exhortations to drink and accusations of wowserism, either. I go to a bunch of conferences each year, one is a massive p*ssup, and that's the one I attend dry. Because there is nothing worse than being hungover at that conference, and I get hungover easily. Nobody has ever given me and my sparkly water a hard time. Quite the opposite, I get, "Oooh, you're so good, I might do Dry July" out of people.

View PostLucrezia Borgia, on 02 August 2019 - 02:22 PM, said:

my niece was recently stocking up on those squeezy yoghurt pouches - loved by toddlers everywhere. i queried why...? music festival - good for “storing” vodka apparently. not sure how this works...vodka and yoghurt does not appeal...maybe they eat the yoghurt, rinse out the pouch, then put the vodka in....

Ewwwww. Vodka and off dairy, yum yum.

View PostLet-it-go, on 02 August 2019 - 05:32 PM, said:

and condoms.

Oh yuck, well that sure just got a lot worse really fast.

#74 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 02 August 2019 - 05:44 PM

It wouldn't bother me if people had a drink but its probably better to just keep it alcohol free.

#75 Fourteenyears

Posted 02 August 2019 - 05:49 PM

I wonder if people’s attitudes towards this stem from their experiences with alcohol at this type of event.  

I wouldn’t have an issue with it.  I have read on EB about people getting unpleasantly drunk and rowdy at weddings /kids birthday parties / school events etc.    But I have been to many of these events where alcohol is present and not witnessed it myself.  

So in my experience, alcohol at these events actually just provides opportunities for positive modelling.    Kids see one parent not drinking because they have to drive.  They see some groups drinking responsibly and others not drinking at all.   They see it as a civilised thing, not something so feral that it needs to be hidden from children.

If I had had an experience of it not being relatively positive, I guess I would feel differently.

And me - I barely drink.  Occasionally socially.   So it isn’t for myself that I don’t mind the idea of booze at these events.

Edited by Fourteenyears, 02 August 2019 - 10:48 PM.





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