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Compulsory school sports carnivals should be banned


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#1 ekbaby

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:05 PM

https://mobile.abc.n...814?pfmredir=sm

Well this should be controversial

My thoughts: I was a very unco child who was good at academics. I think sports carnivals are fine. Yes i came last but it was a good thing for me to experience things that didn’t come easy and to be happy for my peers who did well.
I have one unco kid with low muscle tone and he does the carnivals
My kids carnivals have been very positive atmosphere though. Everyone gets cheered for finishing even if they are a lap behind and the overall message is about having s go, they get house points for participating
Some kids struggle with other aspects of school and the carnival is where they get a chance to shine

#2 lizzzard

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:08 PM

Ridiculous. But very typical... I think I will investing in the cotton industry....

#3 Daffy2016

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:10 PM

Ugh this is hard.

I hated (still hate) sports and sports carnivals. I think the attitude and way sport is taught at school is partly why I struggle with getting enough physical activity.

BUT I also think kids should experience things outside their comfort zone.

BUT also that it’s up to a kid’s parents to decide how much outside their zone they need to go.

#4 purplekitty

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:10 PM

My childhood self votes yes,as would my children.

#5 Baroness Bubbles

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:12 PM

So does that mean that non academic students get to not do exams because of the mental abgiosh and humiliation from other students?

#6 Expelliarmus

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:14 PM

I do t know what sports day is like elsewhere but the primary schools I’ve worked at and my children attended were nowhere near high pressured or compulsory as stated.

Most of the day is tableau sports like water relay and egg and spoon. This year we had modified bocce. We always have a wheelchair race. Then after lunch the sprints are voluntary.

There’s nothing in these events that should be banned. Children should be encouraged to be outside and moving and having a go.

#7 JBH

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:14 PM

I made a speech in year 9 advocating for a choice between entering the competitive events, or running in a large group untimed/placed fun run with the goal of keeping people active. The sporty kids got it once I said a competitive carnival was like writing everyone’s maths marks in order on the board for all to see.

#8 purplekitty

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:15 PM

*
POPULAR

View PostBaroness Bubbles, on 10 August 2019 - 12:12 PM, said:

So does that mean that non academic students get to not do exams because of the mental abgiosh and humiliation from other students?
The equivalent would be to answer test questions orally in front of the whole school where they can appreciate your wrong answers and coming at the bottom.
Then the best are given ribbons to much applause.

#9 MurderBritches

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:16 PM

Ergh....life is hard. Not everyone wins or does well. Not everyone HAS to compete and for those kids who are just not sporty or particularly coordinated it is about just having a go.

What this tells me is that certain schools are not doing it right NOT that participating in school sports carnivals will turn kids off for life. And that some parents pander to their kids every whim.

#10 Julie3Girls

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:18 PM

Depends so much on how the carnival is run by the school.

Our high school does ok with it.
They give the kids the option to sign up for competitive or non competitive events.
Same events but treated very differently.
Competitive events are run as you expect, with the good athletes, results recorded etc.
The non competitive events are just pretty much a free for all. The kids dress up, they skip together, or cartwheel around the track, put music on their iPhones and dance their way through events.
For the majority of the kids, it’s a fun day hanging out with friends.

There are exceptions, and I have no problem with those kids not attending. My oldest hasn’t attended for several years - non athletic, and without a friendship group to hang out with, it would be a day of misery for her. And she gets plenty of other exercise.
My middle child doesn’t attend due to her scoliosis - no need to put her through it when it results in massive back pain.

#11 MurderBritches

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:20 PM

View PostJulie3Girls, on 10 August 2019 - 12:18 PM, said:

Depends so much on how the carnival is run by the school.

Our high school does ok with it.
They give the kids the option to sign up for competitive or non competitive events.
Same events but treated very differently.
Competitive events are run as you expect, with the good athletes, results recorded etc.
The non competitive events are just pretty much a free for all. The kids dress up, they skip together, or cartwheel around the track, put music on their iPhones and dance their way through events.
For the majority of the kids, it’s a fun day hanging out with friends.


There are exceptions, and I have no problem with those kids not attending. My oldest hasn’t attended for several years - non athletic, and without a friendship group to hang out with, it would be a day of misery for her. And she gets plenty of other exercise.
My middle child doesn’t attend due to her scoliosis - no need to put her through it when it results in massive back pain.
This is exactly how DS high school does it. Same with the swimming carnival. Every year he whinges about going and  I make him go to both and every year he comes home having had a ball.

#12 Treasure Island

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:21 PM

Carnivals are fine they give a break from routine and allow physical students to shine. Participation should not be mandatory. I would prefer to see our cross country done after Easter rather then before so it is cooler but I think generally our schools are pretty relaxed when it comes to these events.

#13 purplekitty

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:22 PM

View PostMurderBritches, on 10 August 2019 - 12:20 PM, said:

This is exactly how DS high school does it. Same with the swimming carnival. Every year he whinges about going and  I make him go to both and every year he comes home having had a ball.

They're not the sports carnivals that the article is concerned with,are they?

#14 AliasMater

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:25 PM

Completely agree with the article and the findings of the research by academics.

#15 MurderBritches

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:25 PM

View Postpurplekitty, on 10 August 2019 - 12:22 PM, said:

They're not the sports carnivals that the article is concerned with,are they?
The article says school sports carnivals. I was talking about the ones that happen at my DS school. ????

#16 Mmmcheese

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:27 PM

Yeah, guess it depends on what your long term plan is. More people sticking with physical activity... It's kind of a no brainer that a competitive, public event isn't exactly going to endear the less coordinated to physical pursuits. What's the purpose of a sports carnival? If it is for competitive reasons, then why compulsory attendance?

Edited by Mmmcheese, 10 August 2019 - 12:32 PM.


#17 ~J_WTF~

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:29 PM

View Postpurplekitty, on 10 August 2019 - 12:15 PM, said:

The equivalent would be to answer test questions orally in front of the whole school where they can appreciate your wrong answers and coming at the bottom.
Then the best are given ribbons to much applause.

Exactly. Exams don’t happen like that and usually kids are sitting exams for subjects they are interested in and the content is generally that of which they are comfortable with as they have covered it extensively, not spent a 1/2 lesson on then be expected to be confident enough to be scored on.

I wouldn’t care if they were banned. Same with PE. I was never that sporty, I just found PE all kinds of humiliating really, used every excuse I could to avoid it. Measuring fat in front of your whole class is messed up!

Sports days were social events for me mostly, I didn’t often compete. My kids don’t really like sports, so I just push the oh well you get to hang out with your friends and do no schoolwork angle.

As you can probably notice I am not a big fan of forcing kids to participate in sports.

Edited by ~J_WTF~, 10 August 2019 - 12:43 PM.


#18 Kiwi Bicycle

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:30 PM

I still remember at high school sitting on the field all day, basically having a picnic, with little shade for athletics. Yes we could participate in some fun races like the skipping race but the smart ( or rebellious) girls snuck over the fence and went to the shopping centre down the road for the day. We did have the option of doing homework in a classroom and for the final few years of high school I did this instead.
DS participated in a cross country like fun run. However the preps only had to do 500m and the PE classes beforehand, they practiced. Plus their older student buddies ran with them as well. The top 10 finishers of each year group got ribbons. I think it was low key but still had a get into the school Cross country team for the older students.
I think as long as the main theme is finishing and everyone in a supportive environment, done in the shortest time possible and not all day, I'm ok with it, and I hate running. And of course having a classroom option for those unable or just don't want to should be provided.

#19 ERipley

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:31 PM

.

Edited by ERipley, 19 August 2019 - 08:31 PM.


#20 barrington

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:32 PM

I'm sure that the school my children attend would give themselves pats on the back for being inclusive and non-competitive, and to an extent they are.  They don't announce any events, so parents watching have absolutely no idea whether the 100m sprint or 25m freestyle they are watching is an A, B, C or D grade event.  However, they do make several events at each sport carnival 'compulsory' for all students, which I take umbrage with.  One of my children injured an ankle several years ago attempting a compulsory part of one of the school carnivals and we've had several years of MRI's and physio appointments.  She does 12 hours of sport outside school hours every week - but, of course, this is not the type of sport that is celebrated by most schools.  

And until they line students up for any type of academic or music competitions in front of parents, then I will continue to not support the compulsory nature of these sports days.

#21 purplekitty

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:33 PM

View PostTreasure Island, on 10 August 2019 - 12:21 PM, said:

Carnivals are fine they give a break from routine and allow physical students to shine. Participation should not be mandatory. I would prefer to see our cross country done after Easter rather then before so it is cooler but I think generally our schools are pretty relaxed when it comes to these events.
It would have been a very short day if participation had been voluntary at my school. :)

#22 red_squirrel

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:44 PM

How do they work out the causation on this?
I would hazard a guess that the unco kids were not going to participate in sport as adults whether they attended a carnival or not.

This is the ‘everyone gets a certificate’ thinking that leads to incompetent adults. They are not doing the kids any long term favours.



#23 Mmmcheese

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:49 PM

View Postred_squirrel, on 10 August 2019 - 12:44 PM, said:

How do they work out the causation on this?
I would hazard a guess that the unco kids were not going to participate in sport as adults whether they attended a carnival or not.

This is the ‘everyone gets a certificate’ thinking that leads to incompetent adults. They are not doing the kids any long term favours.

Physical activity is more than just sports...

#24 Nasty Bunsen

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:51 PM

Any school activity (sport, academic, whatever) that results in kids being humiliated should be done better - why on earth is it a choice between cancelling it or making kids suck it up and suffer?

I hated sport at school, the humiliation of PE lessons with teachers who had no place anywhere near children is exactly why I do not exercise in public or in classes now.

Turns out I got sporty kids who love the athletic carnival - and what I’ve seen at my kids school it’s run well, compulsory participation but not pressured or competitive.

That said any kid of mine who says they don’t want to do anything sport related gets a pass out from me, we can go for a walk or dance round the house instead.

#25 seayork2002

Posted 10 August 2019 - 12:51 PM

DS school has them, kids choose to compete or not.

Kids can stay at school if they choose

DS goes and joins in sometimes

There are awards for 1-4 in the race I think




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