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Engineered Oak Flooring


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#1 oneplusabun

Posted 12 August 2019 - 04:25 PM

Has anyone used Engineered Oak floorboards? We are looking at installing them in our reno. There are a multitude of brands and colours from which I am trying to choose and the sales people in our regional area aren't particularly helpful. It appears that they are all of similar quality but wondering if anyone has any recommendations? Thanks!

#2 can'tstayaway

Posted 15 August 2019 - 07:08 AM

What is it about them that appeals to you?

My MIL spent a fortune installing them. She went for a dark colour and they were impossible to keep looking clean. Every speck of dust showed up and she drove herself crazy keeping them scratch free.

The next owners of the house removed and replaced them within 6 months.

We have solid oak floors with a brushed finish and they are gorgeous. They scuff and wear but they are meant to. They are darkening over time from the light blonde to the warm oak (still light coloured). We know we can sand them back and have them repolished whenever we want.  

If cost is an issue, I’d go with a bamboo flooring. There are some really good ones these days. My solid oak was cheaper than MIL’s engineered oak flooring. The solid oak is also more resistant to water damage compared to engineered flooring.

#3 rileys-mum

Posted 15 August 2019 - 07:14 AM

Don’t do the engineered ones.
Solid timber all the way.
My parents spent almost the same as we did on their engineered floor, it scratches so easily and cannot be sanded and re coated.
We have solid oak. In 11 years it has been sanded once and still looks amazing.

#4 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 15 August 2019 - 07:20 AM

We have these engineered boards which are 3 layers of solid oak. They look great and are able to be sanded and recoated.

https://tngflooring.com.au/

I like yellowish boards and went for the graupa colour.

I can PM you my Instagram which shows rooms finished if you want.

Edited by Veritas Vinum Arte, 15 August 2019 - 07:21 AM.


#5 oneplusabun

Posted 20 August 2019 - 10:42 PM

Hi VVA. Sorry I was so slow to come back to this thread. I an heading to Tongue N Groove tomorrow. Would love to see your photos if you don't mind! x

#6 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 20 August 2019 - 11:03 PM

Have sent you a PM with Instagram account name.

Hope you like TnG.

#7 kookyred

Posted 21 August 2019 - 12:12 AM

I have engineered oak floors in an ashy colour.  Benefit is they dont look dirty and are very easy to clean.  3 years on the still (mostly) look great

Down side is they have scratched under the table where our chair stoppers/feet came off, and it's hard to get out.

#8 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 21 August 2019 - 06:57 AM

We had original wood floors. I can tell you that when the feet came off the chairs they scraped through the layers so there were splinters.

Wood is a natural medium so is subject to dents and wear. So drop a metal water bottle or ipad and depending on how they land they dent. Doesn’t matter if it is solid wood or engineered oak, they dent.

#9 CallMeFeral

Posted 21 August 2019 - 10:56 AM

We have engineered timber in our granny flat, it's been about 7 years and still looks nice, and was SIGNIFICANTLY cheaper than solid timber. Our main house has solid timber that is absolutely super - it gets a caning and still looks great. But it's a really old house and original floor, it's probably some kind of hardwood - newer/softer/cheaper ones would not behave the same way. It's not just between engineered and solid, but when you look at solid, what TYPE of wood it is, and sadly hardwood is I believe not very environmentally friendly to use (and expensive besides).
Be careful of bamboo - apparently it warps more when wet than the timber ones.

#10 Dadto2

Posted 27 August 2019 - 01:00 PM

View Postrileys-mum, on 15 August 2019 - 07:14 AM, said:

Don’t do the engineered ones.
Solid timber all the way.
My parents spent almost the same as we did on their engineered floor, it scratches so easily and cannot be sanded and re coated.
We have solid oak. In 11 years it has been sanded once and still looks amazing.

You sure you're talking about the right product? Engineered timber has 5mm+ of hardwood on top of plywood. This can be sanded multiple times, depending on the thickness of the hardwood veneer. The thicker the more expensive. I've had Blackbutt engineered timber floorings for a while and no scratches and dirt doesn't show up, but it is a lighter colour.

My old house had solid timber (blackbutt too). It did look and feel better than the engineered timber. So if you can afford solid timber I would opt for that especially if the engineered timber is close in price to the solid timber. I went for a cheaper engineered timber as it was all I could afford. Looks good though.

The engineered timber has come a long way in recent years as has laminate. I almost went with laminate, I couldn't believe it was actually laminate, looked really good.

#11 Gumbette

Posted 27 August 2019 - 03:32 PM

And it's not always just what you can afford. In a reno you also need to account for the loss in ceiling height if you're going to install a solid floor.  For this reason, we'll probably go for an engineered timber that can be re-sanded.  Will also avoid having the shave the bottom off doors.

Oh and we had solid hardwood floors in the house originally.  It definitely scratched - it was with high quality hard wood (built in the 60's) that I doubt you could even buy any more (kicks myself for not pulling it up and reusing it in our new build).

Edited by Gumbette, 27 August 2019 - 03:34 PM.


#12 CallMeFeral

Posted 27 August 2019 - 05:42 PM

View PostGumbette, on 27 August 2019 - 03:32 PM, said:

(kicks myself for not pulling it up and reusing it in our new build).

Is it possible to do this? I've been thinking this for our new build. I'll be so sorry to lose that timber.

#13 can'tstayaway

Posted 27 August 2019 - 09:49 PM

View PostCallMeFeral, on 27 August 2019 - 05:42 PM, said:

Is it possible to do this? I've been thinking this for our new build. I'll be so sorry to lose that timber.
Yes, but it takes labour hours to pull up without damaging, prepare it for reuse and finding builders willing to install aged timbers. It all adds up to dollars. You could do it yourself to save paying someone else to do it but do you have the know how or time?

We had an old house with seriously old, aged timber. They could not use a nail gun on it so every single nail had to be hammered in by hand. They also had to buy special nails that could go through the wood. The younger tradies just didn’t have the skills for that sort of work.

There’s hardwood and then there’s hardwood.

MIL’s engineered oak floors were only 3mm thick. The recommendation was that they could only be sanded once and even then to be very careful.

#14 CallMeFeral

Posted 27 August 2019 - 10:09 PM

View Postcan, on 27 August 2019 - 09:49 PM, said:

Yes, but it takes labour hours to pull up without damaging, prepare it for reuse and finding builders willing to install aged timbers. It all adds up to dollars. You could do it yourself to save paying someone else to do it but do you have the know how or time?

We had an old house with seriously old, aged timber. They could not use a nail gun on it so every single nail had to be hammered in by hand. They also had to buy special nails that could go through the wood. The younger tradies just didn’t have the skills for that sort of work.

There’s hardwood and then there’s hardwood.

Damn. Yeah, I was assuming it would cost too much. What a waste though.

#15 foom

Posted 27 August 2019 - 10:12 PM

The explanation on wood I was given years ago (about electricity poles) was that you can't get hard hardwood without cutting down old growth forest - its the heartwood in the hardwood tree that is the really hard, insect and decay resistant wood.

Get a fast grown / plantation hardwood tree and there isn't heartwood like on old growth. It hasn't had time to form it.

So if you want truly hard hardwood flooring it would be old growth or recycled.

#16 Gumbette

Posted 27 August 2019 - 11:12 PM

We have a recently built iron bark deck.  The timber is extremely hard.  DH’s hands were covered in blisters and it had to be screwed together as nails couldn’t easily penetrate the timber.  I doubt very much it came from an old growth forest?! (At least I hope not!). Some timbers I.e pine are naturally soft and others like iron bark are much much harder.  They are all rated on a Janka scale according to their hardness.  The harder they are the more expensive.

#17 CallMeFeral

Posted 28 August 2019 - 09:30 AM

View PostGumbette, on 27 August 2019 - 11:12 PM, said:

We have a recently built iron bark deck.  The timber is extremely hard.  DH’s hands were covered in blisters and it had to be screwed together as nails couldn’t easily penetrate the timber.  I doubt very much it came from an old growth forest?! (At least I hope not!). Some timbers I.e pine are naturally soft and others like iron bark are much much harder.  They are all rated on a Janka scale according to their hardness.  The harder they are the more expensive.

Iron bark is a hardwood, and hardwoods take longer to grow - softwoods grow faster so are considered more environmentally friendly to use but are less durable
https://www.urbanlin...cons-best-uses/

It looks like that's slightly different to the heartwood/sapwood discussion, I mean the old dead heartwood of old trees does have different properties to the new wood, but in terms of building I don't think they tend to have the choice of just using heartwood, I'm guessing it's more about what type of tree.
https://northernwood...d_and_heartwood

#18 born.a.girl

Posted 28 August 2019 - 10:03 AM

View PostCallMeFeral, on 27 August 2019 - 10:09 PM, said:

Damn. Yeah, I was assuming it would cost too much. What a waste though.


It's one thing to get the floorboards up, it's another thing altogether to get all of the nails out.




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