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Normal breastfeeding behaviour


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#26 Cocoa Trufflespice

Posted 31 August 2019 - 09:57 PM

So much good advice! Good luck!

Edited by Pink Flamingo, 31 August 2019 - 09:59 PM.


#27 elly35

Posted 31 August 2019 - 10:02 PM

Delete as double posted

Edited by elly35, 01 September 2019 - 08:32 PM.


#28 elly35

Posted 31 August 2019 - 10:09 PM

You already have some knowledge from expressing for a month with your first. Some excellent advice above re: use lanosoh, research and have ready the details for a lactation consultant if needed and nipple shields can be helpful if you can't get baby to latch. My other advice is that if you have to use formula top-ups at first it does not mean you won't be able to get to the point in which you are just breastfeeding. You are already used to expressing so you have more knowledge than a first time mum. Expressing after a feed can build supply

#29 Ellie bean

Posted 01 September 2019 - 12:18 AM

another vote for getting lansinoh in advance, that stuff is amazing
I didn’t need breast pads but having some in case is a good idea
Having formula top ups with my son didn’t affect establishing supply for me at all, if I’d known that with my first child we would have avoided some jaundice, so don’t be afraid of top ups if they’re needed
And if bf doesn’t work out in the long term for whatever reason (for me it was medical reasons unrelated to supply etc) don’t sweat it, a fed baby is a happy baby
Wishing you all the best for a smooth journey

#30 Zippypeaks

Posted 01 September 2019 - 12:26 AM

My first never latched and bottle fed his whole first year (5% breast Milk, 95% formula). My second breastfed like a dream. My advise, you do you! Take a break and give a bottle if you need to, whatever works for you and bub is what is right!

#31 Ellie bean

Posted 01 September 2019 - 12:32 AM

Oh also, I know this is unlikely and it’s pretty rare but I wish I’d known that excessive comfort feeding can be a sign of an issue (eg silent reflux) and spacing feeds out in those rare scenarios can help, so don’t be afraid to get medical advice if things don’t seem right

#32 Lunafreya

Posted 01 September 2019 - 06:36 AM

Remember breastfeeding is something both you and your baby learn to do. Establishing it does take time, but once you get going it’s worth it.

If you ARE having a lot of trouble like I was and feeding is harder baby isn’t getting fed, ask a lactation consultant to get you onto bottle to breast, where you learn to breastfeed and feed baby expressed bottles if it doesn’t happen.

Eat and drink a lot, I found Milo to be great, especially if  I was tired out from feeding

#33 luckynutcracker

Posted 01 September 2019 - 10:28 AM

Formula top ups are required if baby continues to lose weight despite interventions such as expressing, skin to skin etc. Or when the baby is unable to attach and you can't express colostrum, or baby has low blood sugar despite bfing and expressed milk, or baby has stopped urinating and/or pooing.
Weight checks are done at around 48hrs, usually.
Formula supplemention is rife in our hospitals and it should be given for medical reasons such as above.
It's often given for excessive crying on the nights before milk comes in but without the signs above, this is normal behaviour for a healthy term baby so seeking information about what healthy babies do is excellent.
Nocturnal crying behaviour is normal, baby needs holding, skin contact, access to the breast, frequent feeding.
They usually sleep more soundly in the mornings, normal but tiring.

Jaundice is normal for 50% or more of newborns, it doesn't need to be and can't be avoided, it's called normal physiological jaundice, more common in babies who have bruising, early term etc.
"Fed is best" is an odd turn of phrase in the context of feeding a newborn. Doesn't that go without saying?

#34 Ellie bean

Posted 01 September 2019 - 10:59 AM

...

Edited by Ellie bean, 01 September 2019 - 11:17 AM.


#35 NeedSleepNow

Posted 01 September 2019 - 12:22 PM

i know a lot of people won’t agree with this, but this was what really helped me breastfeed 3 babies for around 2 years each
- I put zero pressure on myself around feeding
- if they were excessively cluster feeding and I was fed up, I had no guilt around telling DH to baby wear or take them for a walk so I could get some space
- I spaced out feeds at times when they weren’t getting enough hindmilk and weren’t settled. I found feeding every hour actually made things worse, so i often did baby wearing and went for a walk to space it out a little and to maintain my sanity. For DD who had reflux, constantly feeding was not in her best interests
- I got DH to try give expressed milk for one feed in the early morning, as that block of sleep was really valuable to me!

#36 JomoMum

Posted 01 September 2019 - 01:15 PM

Thank you so much everyone. This is truly so helpful.

One of my greater concerns is around intervening in hospital with formula before my milk comes in, so I will definitely learn more around what’s normal for this time so I can make informed decisions.

I’m definitely not anti formula, but really want to give breastfeeding my best effort. But I won’t be too hard on myself if it doesn’t work. It’s having the opportunity to try that I really want :)

#37 400

Posted 01 September 2019 - 01:26 PM

View PostJomoMum, on 01 September 2019 - 01:15 PM, said:

One of my greater concerns is around intervening in hospital with formula before my milk comes in

Something you could consider, if you have no contraindications, is expressing colostrum before your baby is born. You can start at 37 weeks, collect small amounts of colostrum and freeze them. This does 2 things- firstly begins stimulating the supply so hopefully when your baby is born your colostrum flow is enough to see your baby through until the milk comes in, and secondly gives you a little stash of food to give your baby if you need top ups without having to use formula.

It’s not for everyone but something you could consider.

#38 JomoMum

Posted 01 September 2019 - 01:47 PM

400 thank you. This was something the midwife indicated might be an option in the week leading up. I am having a planned c section for medical reasons so it is definitely something I’ll be asking about closer to the time.

#39 Future-self

Posted 01 September 2019 - 02:02 PM

View PostJomoMum, on 01 September 2019 - 01:47 PM, said:

400 thank you. This was something the midwife indicated might be an option in the week leading up. I am having a planned c section for medical reasons so it is definitely something I’ll be asking about closer to the time.
I did this for number two :) We knew she’d be going straight to at least special care and more likely intensive care so I knew that adding that complication in in was going to be a bugger to bringing supply in. I’d had a really hard time establishing supply and feeding DS so was really really worried about BF number two.
I started hand expressing at 37 weeks from memory. In very small amounts - starting with 1ml syringes that I didn’t even fill at first and was filling 3ml ones the night before we went in to have her at 39 weeks. It bought me some time to begin hand expressing after she was born and we were separated. The hospital were happy to have them in their NICU freezer as they were labelled and dated in their ziplock bags. Definitely worth looking into :)

ETD to change 38 to 39 weeks

Edited by Future-self, 01 September 2019 - 03:23 PM.


#40 Lunafreya

Posted 01 September 2019 - 03:05 PM

My son had to have formula in the end. He’d hardly had anything as I was struggling to feed him and he needed something. So with the full support of the midwife, he had formula. Best thing we did.

Remember, you can still breastfeed after giving a baby formula. You can still breastfeed after giving a baby expresses milk. For us, breastfeeding was the goal and my baby needed to be fed while we were learning.

#41 ilovethebeach

Posted 01 September 2019 - 04:21 PM

Hi, I had 2 bubs neither was breastfed for very long for different reasons. The third I decided I wanted to breastfeed and just relax. I followed the midwives advice in hospital and she fed for 11 months. Whatever happens you are a great mum x ps I second the advice about feeding in public just feed wherever feels natural for you both!

#42 400

Posted 01 September 2019 - 08:47 PM

View PostJomoMum, on 01 September 2019 - 01:47 PM, said:

400 thank you. This was something the midwife indicated might be an option in the week leading up. I am having a planned c section for medical reasons so it is definitely something I’ll be asking about closer to the time.

There is a small theoretical risk of inducing labour from the nipple stimulation so if your medical reason is one where you must avoid any contractions at all cost then it’s not a good idea (stuff like placenta praevia). But I expressed antenatally for DS when I was booked for a Caesar for him because he was breech. My OB was fine with it as long as I knew to come to hospital if I thought I was in labour, she was basically like, we will just do it early if we have to.

I think with heaps of support and dedication like you sound like you have, you’ll do fine, just don’t put too much pressure on yourself. Hopefully it works out for you though x

#43 FeralRebelWClaws

Posted 01 September 2019 - 09:30 PM

I also expressed antenatally as well (as suggested by my hospital and midwife, as I had GD.) Interestingly my hospital suggests all women do it because they noticed that women who had GD and antenatally expressed had higher success rates of breastfeeding! But that is anecdotal. I ended up with over 100mL.

You've had some great advice already, particularly the FB groups and milk meg. I was really hoping to breastfeed and aimed initially for 6 months. Now I am still feeding him at bedtime and he's 3 this month!

#44 blackcat20

Posted 01 September 2019 - 10:04 PM

View PostLunafreya, on 01 September 2019 - 03:05 PM, said:


Remember, you can still breastfeed after giving a baby formula. You can still breastfeed after giving a baby expresses milk. For us, breastfeeding was the goal and my baby needed to be fed while we were learning.

Exactly. I didn't get to see my baby for ten hours after she was delivered by CS so she was given formula. But as soon as we were able, the nurses had her on the boob, and were hand expressing me before then. She's almost six months old and we're still breastfeeding, we dropped the formula top ups a couple of weeks in.

#45 cinnamonnutmeg

Posted 01 September 2019 - 11:07 PM

I admit that I have been exceptionally lucky with my 3, however there have been things that have helped.

Firstly is I did what worked for us, not the nurses. Definitely listen to your lactation consultant, they are professionals for a reason, but how they wanted me to feed just didnt work for me. So I sat properly when they were around and went back to my way when they were gone. Apparently bubs wasn't attached properly, but whatever. We were happy.

A great tip I got from Jane the Virgin of all places was to shove your boob in their mouth like a burger.

Drinks lots of water. I like ANZAC biscuit, apparently oats are good for breastmilk and its a good excuse to smash a few.

I know they are all like "drain one side, then go to the other" but all 3 of mine have been snackers. The last 2 are/were super bad for it. So I block feed. One side for 3ish hours, then the other. I found that if i didnt than my second would get lactase overload (frothy green explosive poos) and refluxy.

Lastly, I feeding covers are bogus. Black singlet underneath your tshirt covers your bely, then just lift up your top. The bay covers the boob itself. Mostly discreet (until baby stops to have a squizz around) enough to never get noticed.




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