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Redbacks - deterring without spraying?


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#1 purpleduck

Posted 01 September 2019 - 03:32 PM

Been looking around the patio and spotted a couple of redbacks and a few webs.

Mainly in corners and under window brickwork etc.

I’m not too keen to do surface spray etc but happy to remove the webs and see if the disruption will encourage them to move elsewhere.

Thoughts?

#2 JustBeige

Posted 01 September 2019 - 03:59 PM

You need more daddy long legs.  They eat them.

If you dont want to do a big surface spray, you could just spray the individual web.  That will just then take care of that particular spider.

I just use indoor cockroach surface spray - so legal napalm and that seems to work

#3 purpleduck

Posted 01 September 2019 - 04:34 PM

And how do I encourage daddy long legs?

#4 red_squirrel

Posted 01 September 2019 - 05:39 PM

I have only ever seen daddy long legs inside. They are the only thing that eats them.

I spray the individual webs with one shot and then dispose of the dead spider.

You can try misting the web lightly with a bit of water and the spider will come out as it thinks it has caught something. Then you whack it with a spade.

#5 StoneFoxArrow

Posted 01 September 2019 - 06:58 PM

I tend to relocate redbacks to the bush, they're the most timid spiders. But unfortunately I don't think you'll have an easy time discouraging them. If they like it there, they like it there.

As well as daddy-long legs, I'm pretty sure black house spiders (Badumna sp.) are redback predators. They have funnel shaped webs and often live in eaves or in corners inside.

#6 BornToLove

Posted 01 September 2019 - 07:02 PM

View PostJustBeige, on 01 September 2019 - 03:59 PM, said:

If you dont want to do a big surface spray, you could just spray the individual web.  That will just then take care of that particular spider.

We get them on our front step and this is what we do. We spray once when start to see webs and they don’t come back for some time, though they seem to reappear each spring. We also use indoor cockroach spray.

#7 kadoodle

Posted 01 September 2019 - 07:22 PM

Chickens eat them. But that would mean chooks on the veranda leaving plops for you to clean up. Go the surface spray to get the eggsacs.

#8 SkeptiHandsOnMum

Posted 01 September 2019 - 07:26 PM

They love my letter box. Nothing seems to work for long.

#9 DaLittleEd

Posted 01 September 2019 - 07:27 PM

I tend to just move them on. Even the ones inside get caught and relocated.

But then, I have been bitten by a juvenile red back (not quite full size), and while it was painful for a couple of days, I didn't have a bad reaction. I believe that they are not actually particularly venomous, just a small percentage of people have an actual allergic reaction to them.

#10 purplekitty

Posted 01 September 2019 - 07:29 PM

We  don't have them anymore after the asian geckos moved in.

#11 SeaPrincess

Posted 02 September 2019 - 01:21 AM

We contacted a pest controller about getting rid of spiders and they weren't really interested until I told them that we had redbacks in the children's playroom. The strange thing is that I've never seen them inside any other house that we've ever lived in.

#12 Squeekums The Elf

Posted 02 September 2019 - 11:46 AM

Fire
New house

#13 71Cath

Posted 02 September 2019 - 11:59 AM

View Post*Nasty*Squeekums*, on 02 September 2019 - 11:46 AM, said:

Fire
New house

My suggestion would be moving house, but Squeekum's idea is good too.

#14 chicken_bits

Posted 02 September 2019 - 12:13 PM

View Post*Nasty*Squeekums*, on 02 September 2019 - 11:46 AM, said:

Fire
New house

This is the most reasonable suggestion I've read so far.

#15 purplekitty

Posted 02 September 2019 - 12:16 PM

When we used to have them really badly I just checked under chairs etc. when we were going to use them.

The pest control people told us it was difficult to spray for them because they shut down their breathing and are able to avoid the chemicals.

#16 molinero

Posted 02 September 2019 - 12:45 PM

Yep our strata gets pest sprayed on the regular.

We have plenty of redbacks hanging about.

On the day of pest spraying, we basically see a whole heap of angry spiders running around. The sprays aren't generally enough to 'kill them,' just p*ss them off, unfortunately.

#17 Smoo

Posted 02 September 2019 - 12:47 PM

I'm going to second the chickens... before a fox managed to eat ours we had virtually no bugs. They eat all the cockroaches etc. that the spiders eat and eat the spiders...

Currently refitting the door on the coop before we get more...

#18 PrincessPeach

Posted 02 September 2019 - 01:02 PM

Have a resident Willie Wagtail - we have one who loves to sit on our pool fence, i havent seen a redback for ages.

But other than that spray/squash them.

#19 rileys-mum

Posted 02 September 2019 - 01:29 PM

We have 100’s of them. We have tried spraying - last’s only 8 weeks or so. As time has gone by we have learned to cohabitate.

For the amount we have had in areas where the kids play - I am now a firm believer they are not as dangerous as everyone makes out. No one that I am aware of has been bitten.

I am certainly more concerned about the chemical sprays than I am about them. And that is saying something as I have a fair phobia about spiders.....

#20 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 02 September 2019 - 01:43 PM

We were overrun with redbacks and black spiders, and DH was so worried about them (and didn’t want the kids to play outside) that we got a pest company to spray - it’s worked brilliantly. We had it done previously, it took about 4 years to become reinfested.

I’d love a less toxic way to keep the redback population under control.

#21 chicken_bits

Posted 02 September 2019 - 02:10 PM

View Postpurplekitty, on 02 September 2019 - 12:16 PM, said:

The pest control people told us it was difficult to spray for them because they shut down their breathing and are able to avoid the chemicals.

:omg:

#22 StoneFoxArrow

Posted 03 September 2019 - 07:11 AM

View Postrileys-mum, on 02 September 2019 - 01:29 PM, said:

We have 100’s of them. We have tried spraying - last’s only 8 weeks or so. As time has gone by we have learned to cohabitate.

For the amount we have had in areas where the kids play - I am now a firm believer they are not as dangerous as everyone makes out. No one that I am aware of has been bitten.

I am certainly more concerned about the chemical sprays than I am about them. And that is saying something as I have a fair phobia about spiders.....

They are medically significant spiders (as in, their venom can kill a human). However, I don't consider them dangerous because they are the most timid spider I know of. You would have to try so hard to get one to bite you. I relocate them regularly and they don't want to have anything to do with me!

Wolf spiders, however are super aggressive but they aren't medically significant to humans. I call them the small dogs of the spider world - because they think they're more dangerous/larger than they are! Also I think they look like puppies, but that's probably not what anyone wants to hear...

#23 Sugarplum Poobah

Posted 03 September 2019 - 09:05 AM

Spraying for redbacks can also be useless as they're the first spider to return -- long before the predator spiders come back. Ask me how I know...

We have lots of daddy long legs in the house and have never seen a redback inside.

The veranda is another matter altogether. It's home to redbacks that could comfortably straddle a 20c piece. They get squished (sorry, not sorry -- they hang out under the table and chairs which is a bit too close for comfort). Those further afield get left alone. I manually destroy egg sacs on the veranda too.

We found one of these near the shed https://collections....u/species/13719
(don't open this if you're a serious arachnophobe). Now that really freaked me out.

We're on acreage. Spiders are a fact of life.

#24 GlitteryElfFarts

Posted 03 September 2019 - 12:17 PM

View Post*Nasty*Squeekums*, on 02 September 2019 - 11:46 AM, said:

Fire
New house
We spray with hair spray(extra hold)squish, squish again and then put in outside rubbish bin. If the bbq is on, they get flambéd.

After having to rush a 2yr old to hospital with a redback bite, we take no prisoners. She had ongoing rash problems on her feet for a few years after being bitten on the big toe.

#25 StoneFoxArrow

Posted 03 September 2019 - 12:27 PM

View PostNasty Poobah, on 03 September 2019 - 09:05 AM, said:

Spraying for redbacks can also be useless as they're the first spider to return -- long before the predator spiders come back. Ask me how I know...

We have lots of daddy long legs in the house and have never seen a redback inside.

The veranda is another matter altogether. It's home to redbacks that could comfortably straddle a 20c piece. They get squished (sorry, not sorry -- they hang out under the table and chairs which is a bit too close for comfort). Those further afield get left alone. I manually destroy egg sacs on the veranda too.

We found one of these near the shed https://collections....u/species/13719
(don't open this if you're a serious arachnophobe). Now that really freaked me out.

We're on acreage. Spiders are a fact of life.

Oh, I've yet to see one of these in person! They're quite spectacular. But sorry that you had to see one, they're probably one of the more icky looking spiders. I love spiders and even I struggle with the chunky ones (funnel webs, mouse spiders, trapdoors).




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