Jump to content

Mild peanut allergy


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 jmjsa

Posted 14 September 2019 - 09:07 PM

DS is 13 and when he was young had a heap of allergy tests done which came up with eggs, peanuts and some grasses so obviously we avoided these foods.  Fast forward to last year and we asked our GP about retesting to see if he had grown out of these allergies.  The GP said that instead of skin prick tests that we had in the past that we could just do a blood test which we did.  The results did not show an allergy to peanuts or eggs so we assumed that he had grown out of it.

Anyway he is not really an adventurous eater so peanuts were not eaten.  Today however I bought rocky road chocolate and he decided to eat some and I didn’t even think about it.  About 30 minutes later he mentioned that the roof of his mouth was itchy.  Assuming hay fever and perhaps the fact that he spend the weekend on school camp roughing it I gave antihistamines and all was fine.  Still we hadn’t even thought about the peanuts.  Then tonight he had some more chocolate and his throat became itchy.  Then it clicked that it may have been the peanuts.  I have given more antihistamine and it has settled and obviously no more peanuts.

I guess the question is can you be allergic to something even if blood tests say you aren’t.

#2 Mmmcheese

Posted 14 September 2019 - 09:09 PM

Yep, my daughter was. She had the blood test, it was negative, so did the hospital challenge and had a reaction at 2 grams of peanuts. (Hives, antihistamines sorted it.)

#3 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 14 September 2019 - 09:24 PM

I’ve never heard of a blood test that can detect a specific allergy. Is it new?

DS is allergic to nuts, and there was no one test to confirm it. They did skin prick as well as ask me all about his history of reactions to make a diagnosis. A blood test was never mentioned.

Maybe his blood didn’t show anything unusual because your son had avoided peanuts for so long?

#4 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 14 September 2019 - 09:27 PM

Also, a nephew has an egg allergy and the royal children’s hospital is managing it, and only an oral challenge could determine if he had out grown it. And the RCH is one of the best.

I think you need to see an allergy specialist again, not that GP.

#5 400

Posted 14 September 2019 - 09:40 PM

I think the blood tests look for the presence of antibodies to the substance, which would decrease over time when there is no exposure. But this doesn’t mean the body can’t amount an immune response- memory cells loiter in extremely low numbers and then ramp up when exposure occurs. I’d bet you that if you did the blood test now that he has had a reaction that it would be positive.

In the meantime, I would avoid peanuts completely until you get to the bottom of it- allergies increase with each exposure and given the last one was an itchy throat I’d be treading very carefully!

Edited by 400, 14 September 2019 - 09:40 PM.


#6 QuirkyMum

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:31 PM

Disclaimer: I know nothing about true allergies and have experience with intolerances but when my son and me were tested for allergies, we were told it is kind of screening.
I remember results were numbers and there was a note at the bottom of the page saying that result over *a certain number* means that there's a chance of ever having an anaphilactic reaction to the allergen. So purely estimating likelihood of a serious reaction.
OP, I'd go to a children's hospital allergy clinic, get them to have your son do a test at the clinic and hopefully get you to safely re introduce peanuts in his diet, so that he doesn't risk a massive reaction when lets say having chocolate at a friend's house.

#7 Prancer is coming

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:59 PM

I did not think blood tests were as reliable, but I am no expert.  My son was allergic to nuts.  A few years after being diagnosed, skin prick test indicated he was not allergic anymore.  Like your child, my son was never a big nut eater.  A year or so on he was eating mixed nuts and started vomiting.  I don’t think I really twigged at first as he had had issues previously with vomiting for no reason, but after the second time I realised.  When we were next due for annual allergy tests I advised the doctor who said the test was negative, but then came up positive in the next round of testing.

He tested negative for nuts again a few years back, but the new allergist we were seeing would not let him eat the specific nut until we did a challenge in hospital, which he passed.  She gave us some really detailed information about how to challenge other nuts at home, which was a lot more gradual and probably safer than just eating the allergen!

#8 ali-song

Posted 15 September 2019 - 10:58 PM

View Post~LemonMyrtle~, on 14 September 2019 - 09:24 PM, said:

I’ve never heard of a blood test that can detect a specific allergy. Is it new?

DS is allergic to nuts, and there was no one test to confirm it. They did skin prick as well as ask me all about his history of reactions to make a diagnosis. A blood test was never mentioned.

Maybe his blood didn’t show anything unusual because your son had avoided peanuts for so long?

Not particularly new, but also not always sensitive: https://en.m.wikiped...rgosorbent_test

My son had this testing after his very first reaction to peanuts, which would have been about 12 years ago. Came up sky high to peanuts (due to recent exposure), negative to all other nuts. Subsequent skin prick testing didn’t bother with peanuts (clearly allergic), and came up mildly positive to other nuts. Has never had a reaction to a tree nut.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.