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Dr trying to insist on Opioid perscription


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#1 yummymummycakes

Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:28 AM

Unfortunately yesterday I had an accident with the couch jumping in front of my foot.

The foot was immediately throbbing, swelled massively but had good colour. As it was a Saturday I made the decision to go to local GP who immediately sent me off for X-Rays. She rang yesterday afternoon to say that there were a number of broken bones and that she would send a referral to the fracture clinic where I should present on Monday or Tuesday for a cast to be fitted.

However last night despite keeping the foot elevated, it was changing to a purplish colour and still trobbing badly. Rang Nurse on Call of said it would be a good idea to go to ED to have it checked.

Went in - had it xrayed - disclosed 4 broken bones - said since referral was put in to wait until Tuesday for cast and then said they would give me a script for Oxycontin. I said I didnt want it - he said they pain will get worse - I said I dont want it  as I have 2 SN children that I need to be able to look after. He said - you are really going to need this if you dont want to be back here.

Yet again - I replied I dont want it. He then said 'it's just a piece of paper, dont be a hero - take the painkillers!'

I then asked him if he was aware of the problem that we have in our society currently with the misuse/overuse of opioids??

I was so annoyed by his cavalier attitude towards painkillers

Edited by yummymummycakes, 15 September 2019 - 08:52 AM.


#2 Expelliarmus

Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:35 AM

Multiple broken bones is a good reason for painkillers though.

Hope you are not in too much pain and it heals well for you.

#3 Living Type

Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:40 AM

What were you expecting them to do at night other than give you pain killers?

#4 Apple14

Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:42 AM

Do you think that you would somehow be likely to overuse/misuse the prescription??
If this is the case then good on you for refusing it.

I personally would’ve taken the script. 4 broken bones is nothing to sneeze at, and I’m so terrible at taking pills continuously, I know for a fact I would not be one to overuse/misuse.
I hope your foot is feeling ok today.

#5 Manicmum

Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:43 AM

You can’t look after the kids if in extreme pain either.

#6 Bono25

Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:49 AM

I'm a bit confused about what you expected them to do? You have a broken foot. How do you expect to do anything when you can't walk. He's right, you'd just end up back at the Dr's or hospital in more pain. There's nothing to be gained by refusing to take the script. He was probably frustrated because there were a million other people who needed help.

#7 yummymummycakes

Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:51 AM

View PostLiving Type, on 15 September 2019 - 08:40 AM, said:

What were you expecting them to do at night other than give you pain killers?

I was sent in due to the foot changing colour. Otherwise I probably would have tried an icepack

View PostApple14, on 15 September 2019 - 08:42 AM, said:

Do you think that you would somehow be likely to overuse/misuse the prescription??
If this is the case then good on you for refusing it.

I personally would’ve taken the script. 4 broken bones is nothing to sneeze at, and I’m so terrible at taking pills continuously, I know for a fact I would not be one to overuse/misuse.
I hope your foot is feeling ok today.

Seeing first hand the damage that prescription drugs can do has made me learn to use mind over matter.
Dr prescribed Lryica for nerve pain that I currently have in my shoulder that I need surgery on. 25mg knocked me out for 10 hours! My 14 year old had to look after my 13 year old. Only took that once and no more. Not I just deal with it.

#8 yummymummycakes

Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:53 AM

View PostBono25, on 15 September 2019 - 08:49 AM, said:

I'm a bit confused about what you expected them to do?

Was sent in due to major colour change of foot. Apparently it can indicate lack of blood flow

#9 NeedSleepNow

Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:54 AM

I don’t think his attitude was cavalier....I think multiple breaks is quite a sound reason for prescribing pain killers! That said, he should have just respected your answer and encouraged you to take the script in case you needed it at any point and not argued. For most people, taking one painkiller wouldn’t interfere with their ability to care for their family, but you are the best judge on it for you!

#10 yummymummycakes

Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:55 AM

View PostManicmum, on 15 September 2019 - 08:43 AM, said:

You can’t look after the kids if in extreme pain either.

You would be suprised what a single mother can do when she has no choice in the matter. No point in taking drugs if all they do is knock me out!

#11 annodam

Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:57 AM

Could you have asked for some other type of pain relief, something that doesn't/won't knock you out?
Just to take the edge off.

#12 Lady Sybil Vimes

Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:59 AM

That’s unusual. I’ve had two ED visits with DS2 this week and while I was in the paediatric ED room I heard a doctor refuse Endone to a patient with a broken toe. I’ve heard other doctors do the same thing.

Some doctors just don’t realise, though. I had a doctor tell me she was going to give me a script for Endone after my c-section and a midwife firmly told her she was only going to give Voltaren, which was fine by me.

#13 yummymummycakes

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:16 AM

View Postannodam, on 15 September 2019 - 08:57 AM, said:

Could you have asked for some other type of pain relief, something that doesn't/won't knock you out?
Just to take the edge off.

Took Panadol & Neurofen that was enough to take the edge off.

View PostLady Sybil Vimes, on 15 September 2019 - 08:59 AM, said:

That’s unusual. I’ve had two ED visits with DS2 this week and while I was in the paediatric ED room I heard a doctor refuse Endone to a patient with a broken toe. I’ve heard other doctors do the same thing.

Some doctors just don’t realise, though. I had a doctor tell me she was going to give me a script for Endone after my c-section and a midwife firmly told her she was only going to give Voltaren, which was fine by me.

Thats what worries me. The fact that the hospital is located in what is deemed to be a low socioeconomic area with a high rate of AOD issues - I would have thought they would have a better policy around the use of opioids.

#14 Ellie bean

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:19 AM

Honestly prescribing opioids for multiple broken bones doesn’t seem like overkill, I don’t think you need to worry.

#15 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:21 AM

I was in  ED with my adult daughter who had sustained a really nasty burn.
It was bad, follow up visit to be treated by a plastic surgeon bad.

She was also offered Endone.
I was horrified, I know it was a nasty injury but the numbing cream had made her comfortable and she hadn't even been given panadol.
Why not try something easier first?

We have had 4 family members with operations over the past 2 years. I think I could have paid off the house if I had sold the stuff we were given!

#16 Just Jack

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:24 AM

If you're really concerned, you could make a complaint/comment to the hospital.

If it helps however, you may be pleased to know the prescription guidelines will be changing soon.  https://www.tga.gov....ription-opioids

#17 BornToLove

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:25 AM

Pain management isn’t understood well from both a patient and doctor prospective.

To be honest, I would have raise my concerns more Constructively. ‘I have two children with special needs and have had issues in the past with strong pain relievers knocking me out. Is another pain relief option to assist with the pain but allow me to keep up with my kids?’

Edited by BornToLove, 15 September 2019 - 09:26 AM.


#18 Ivy Ivy

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:26 AM

I'd second the advice to take the prescription and only get it filled if you are in severe pain, and maybe just fraction the usual dose if you need any, if you're likely to get very sedated as a side effect.
He was offering you emergency management, and treating acute severe pain is part of that.  Nobody will force you to use the prescription.

For what it's worth, and this is not directed at any specific person or poster:
Doctors get VERY SICK of hearing from almost every single patient (and everyone says it like they're unusual in this regard) - "oh I don't like taking pills, I rarely even take a Panadol" ... then the patient wants to detail various examples of how they cope without medication...
so it's possible he just lumped you in with the other hundred patients who have said that to him recently, and he wanted to just finish the conversation. Maybe he was cavalier, but he's managing emergencies, and not giving you enough in the script to continue a lifelong addiction, he is trusting GPs etc won't let you go down that path in future if you run through his script.

Emergency departments never stop.  They're more and more under-resourced every year.  Massive mistakes get made because nurses and doctors are rushed off their feet and sleep-deprived and are caring for too many patients per shift and at once.  He really doesn't have time to debate the finer points of opiod dependence in society with you - he just doesn't care to enter that discussion, he has numerous other patients on the go taking up mental bandwidth to care for.  And trust me when I say he knows all about opiod dependence - he'll be resuscitating an overdosed near-death addict before too long in that very ED.

#19 CallMeFeral

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:33 AM

This is what those pain killers are FOR. Short term severe pain where the injury and pain will self-resolve but in the short term the pain may be debilitating.

These things are on prescription, it's not like you could go in in 3 months and get a new script due to broken bones 3 months ago. And similarly if you don't want the script, don't fill it - I'm not sure what the benefit is of arguing with the doctor and then judging them for prescribing PAINkillers for PAIN.

DH broke his toe last night and couldn't sleep due to the pain. I asked why he didn't asked for a prescription with codeine at least - panadol isn't cutting it and now he's lost a night of sleep as well. He didn't know he couldn't get it OTC anymore. I wish they'd offered.

#20 TrixieBelden

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:40 AM

I would not describe offering short course opioids for a variety of injuries including multiple fractures and burns as cavalier or horrifying.

There are very extensive evidence-based guidelines on appropriate analgesia to be offered - offered, not tipped down your throat whilst someone holds you down - for a variety of injuries. Experience has taught me that some people who consider themselves ‘stoic’ can exacerbate their injuries by refusing adequate analgesia, resulting in a return trip to hospital and more days off work than would have been the case had they taken appropriate analgesia earlier.

Some women will also need opioids post c-section. Some will not. I chart them as a matter of course so they are available post operatively as one of several options.  I would be very unimpressed by the poor clinical judgment of any member of staff deciding upfront not to offer a particular analgesic deemed appropriate by those of us who manage pain as part of our daily work without having conducted a thorough pain assessment and being open to the possibility that pain may change. If an NSAID is sufficient, that’s great - but the level of analgesia required is tailored to the patient, not the person handing out the pills.

As always, we do not operate a totalitarian state. You are free to avail yourself of the analgesia offered or not as you wish, and of course to berate the staff trying to help you also if it makes you feel better.

#21 Oriental lily

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:44 AM

I was given oxy post c section . I needed up and walking to travel to NICU to be with my baby in another hospital . My mum was an  prescription opioid addict for 15 years before finally getting off three years ago .

No once was I startled or concerned by taking medically indicated pain killers . The important thing here is MEDICALLY INDICATED .

Once the pain can be managed comfortably without opioids then it should be stopped . You seem to be aware of the dangers of reliance and addiction so why are you worried ?

Opioids like OxyContin are perfect for extreme acute pain . Like yours .

It’s only when you get in to the realms of chronic pain that unspecified that it can get very wishy washy on the need of it . This sort of prescribing is what the medical system has failed in the past and is trying to stop now .

I personally see no problem with prescribing for a crushed foot in the short term to make life bearable .

I would be more concerned if they sent you home to wait for a fracture clinic without some strong pain killers .

#22 amdirel

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:47 AM

I don't understand why you didn't ask for something else if you didn't want what he was prescribing, like a paracetamol/codeine. I doubt an ED doctor wants to discuss broader community issues with you on a Saturday night.

And honestly the amount of times health care professionals have the conversation of "ow it really hurts" "here's a pain killer" "no I don't like drugs", is rather ridiculous. I've said "don't be a hero" soooo many times. Pain management is a responsibility of a health care professional.

#23 Sabine75

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:50 AM

It is medicine with a purpose, the fact that some people misuse it should not mean that it shouldn't be available for sick people who need it.

I had a teen go through all sorts of prolonged pain and anxiety and they prescribed every other drug known to see if it would work - none did.  I went back to my GP in another town to get the strong stuff - two days of medication and it was all sorted.  My original GP only prescribed a limited dose - enough to do the job - she had prescribed it before for a smilier situation  ( again a limited small dose) . but no one listend to me and I offered to let them call my original GP to verify his history.  

I don't know how long my son would have been in pain, with sleepless nights and escalating anxiety due to lack of sleep - so I am annoyed when blanket rules are made due to the misuse by some patients .

#24 lucky 2

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:50 AM

4 broken bones = pain. For nearly all people.
The ed Dr was offering pain relief, that's a part of his job.
He wasn't cavalier, I think he was being realistic and providing emergency medicine.
He didn't take the time to unpack your reticence to use the opioids and dismissed your objections as you wanting to be a hero. He didn't listen.
He could have accepted your concerns and talk about alternatives, panadeine might help, still an opioid.
You probably have a high pain threshold.

When pain is high and you take an opioid, if the dose is right, sometimes you don't get very sleepy, but your pain fades and it's a blessed relief. That's a good thing, thinking back on the many times I've broken bones.
You will feel better when it is immobilized, shame you have to wait till Tuesday.

Ftr Lyrica isn't an opioid and it knocked me out too, it's very different to the opioid you were ordered. Comparing apples with oranges.

Panadol and Nurofen will help but as you said, it's only taking the edge off. But if that's enough for you it's your body, your decision!

#25 Kiwi Bicycle

Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:53 AM

View Postyummymummycakes, on 15 September 2019 - 08:51 AM, said:


Seeing first hand the damage that prescription drugs can do has made me learn to use mind over matter.
Dr prescribed Lryica for nerve pain that I currently have in my shoulder that I need surgery on. 25mg knocked me out for 10 hours! My 14 year old had to look after my 13 year old. Only took that once and no more. Not I just deal with it.

I was prescribed Lyrica, and it was clearly explained to me that it will make you very tired. In fact you are weaned onto it and told to take it at bedtime. Both the prescribing doctor, the chemist plus the sticker placed on the packet said this.

You cannot take Voltaren type medications when you have a broken bone, which would of reduced the swelling as it affects bone healing. Therefore you are limited to a mixture of paracetamol,  ifobofren and opioids. Usually all together. I assume you probably had already fone panadol and nurofen, so that's the only pain medication left.




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