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#1 qak

Posted 08 October 2019 - 07:25 PM

... put soiled nappies in the recycling bin???? :no2:

How could people possibly think used nappies were recyclable???

I thought those were pretty obviously general waste :angry:  

The main recycling contaminants according to this link are:
- greasy pizza boxes
- nappies
- soft plastics
- E-waste
- used tissues or paper towels
- food waste
- crockery & pyrex
- textiles
- garden waste
- bagged recyclables

https://www.cleanawa...-contamination/

#2 PizzaPlease

Posted 08 October 2019 - 07:44 PM

View Postqak, on 08 October 2019 - 07:25 PM, said:

... put soiled nappies in the recycling bin???? Posted Image

How could people possibly think used nappies were recyclable???

I thought those were pretty obviously general waste Posted Image  

The main recycling contaminants according to this link are:
- greasy pizza boxes
- nappies
- soft plastics
- E-waste
- used tissues or paper towels
- food waste
- crockery & pyrex
- textiles
- garden waste
- bagged recyclables

https://www.cleanawa...-contamination/

In the case of nappies I suspect it's less about ignorance and more about having a full garbage bin and a thousand dirty nappies, not defending the practice but I doubt it's because people didn't realise. Some off these are a bit ambiguous though as allowable items do vary between councils (at least they do in Vic).

Not sure it's worth getting too upset about this until the current impasse is sorted though. I'm not sure any of the recycling being collected anywhere in the country is actually being recycled at the moment (as opposed to going into storage) so that's probably the more pressing issue.

#3 PrincessPeach

Posted 08 October 2019 - 08:13 PM

When you consider very few people realise you shouldnt just be dumping dirty nappies poo & all into the bin im not surprised.

You are supposed to dispose of the poo into the toilet & then put the nappy in the bin.

#4 DM. 2012

Posted 08 October 2019 - 08:20 PM

A lot of it, especially nappies is ignorance.  There are some that I could understand some people being confused about like paper towels and pizza boxes that still have food on them.  The others are all pretty obvious.

Something I noticed recently though is that we bought pizza from Pizza Hut and there was a round piece of cardboard under the pizzas, so we could just throw out the round piece and the box was nice and clean for recycling.

#5 Murderino

Posted 08 October 2019 - 08:41 PM

I agree for a lot of it, it is not that they don’t know, they don’t care.

There is no way you can think a dirty nappy (or even a clean one) is okay to recycle.

View PostPrincessPeach, on 08 October 2019 - 08:13 PM, said:

When you consider very few people realise you shouldnt just be dumping dirty nappies poo & all into the bin im not surprised.

You are supposed to dispose of the poo into the toilet & then put the nappy in the bin.

Yes any time someone asked me about using cloth nappies for my two and were grossed out at dropping the poo in the toilet I’d point out that they were supposed to be doing the same thing.

#6 ipsee

Posted 08 October 2019 - 09:09 PM

I'm sure I've been told pizza boxes are ok.

Maybe it has changed again.

#7 ~J_F~

Posted 08 October 2019 - 09:18 PM

I will admit that it wasn’t until mine were a good amount of time out of nappies that I found out that your were meant to dump the poo.

This is the first place we have lived that does recycling, so we had to do a lot of googling to know what was ok and what wasn’t.

#8 MissBehaving

Posted 08 October 2019 - 09:35 PM

.

Edited by MissBehaving, 16 October 2019 - 09:02 AM.


#9 Jenflea

Posted 08 October 2019 - 09:42 PM

I know a lot of people think if it's glass it gets recycled, not knowing Pyrex and any toughened glass  such as Corningware or Corelle can't be recycled.

#10 Expelliarmus

Posted 08 October 2019 - 09:43 PM

We have kerbside green waste so my pizza boxes can go in there. It just seems common sense not to recycle disposable nappies - it says it right there in the product name ...

#11 Ellie bean

Posted 08 October 2019 - 10:36 PM

View PostJenflea, on 08 October 2019 - 09:42 PM, said:

I know a lot of people think if it's glass it gets recycled, not knowing Pyrex and any toughened glass  such as Corningware or Corelle can't be recycled.
Thanks I actually didn’t know that, now I do!
Surely everyone knows about nappies though

#12 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 08 October 2019 - 10:49 PM

View PostJenflea, on 08 October 2019 - 09:42 PM, said:

I know a lot of people think if it's glass it gets recycled, not knowing Pyrex and any toughened glass  such as Corningware or Corelle can't be recycled.
I did not know that!

Mind you, I can't think of the last time I threw any of that out though.

#13 Murderino

Posted 08 October 2019 - 10:51 PM

Our council have recently told us no glass as it’s the worst contaminant. They have separated collection points and I’m waiting on a crate, otherwise bin it.

#14 gettin my fance on

Posted 08 October 2019 - 11:22 PM

View Postbabylove69, on 08 October 2019 - 09:35 PM, said:

Our council says pizza boxes are fine to recycle and that things don't need to be spotless:
"Containers can have a small amount of residue and
will not ruin the whole recycling load. Rinsing is not required,
although it helps to reduce odour in your recycling bin."

Yep, it's always been a conundrum for me, to rinse and waste water or not to rinse and ruin the recycling.

I give it a quick rinse.

#15 DaLittleEd

Posted 09 October 2019 - 12:45 AM

View Postgettin my fance on, on 08 October 2019 - 11:22 PM, said:

Yep, it's always been a conundrum for me, to rinse and waste water or not to rinse and ruin the recycling.

I give it a quick rinse.

I just wash the recycling stuff at the end of a load of dishes. Now I have a disgwash I just pop it in there.

#16 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 09 October 2019 - 07:17 AM

The nappies will be because the regular rubbish bin was full.
I had two in nappies at one stage, the rubbish bin was often not big enough. So we got a bigger one, which cost us a few hundred every year extra in rates, but was worth the expense for us. Once the nappy stage ended the same bin was about 1/3 full every week.

Imagine if you had two or three in nappies and couldn’t afford the extra bin space? As a stressed, sleep deprived, parent I’d be tempted just to dump them and make it someone else’s problem.

Pretty sure my MIL bags her recyclables. It’s part ignorance, part her fear of “germs” and wanting her bins to be pristine at all time, so no food juices are allowed to escape. She also doesn’t recycle a lot of plastics, like strawberry containers and take away food containers, cause she doesn’t know they are recyclable. There is a huge lack of information on what is and isn’t recyclable. Half the time I feel like I am guessing.

DH got a note from the garbage truck driver because he was recycling coat hangers. How was he to know they weren’t recyclable? They are 90% metal.

Councils have a lot to answer for.

#17 Lucrezia Borgia

Posted 09 October 2019 - 07:22 AM

View PostPrincessPeach, on 08 October 2019 - 08:13 PM, said:

When you consider very few people realise you shouldnt just be dumping dirty nappies poo & all into the bin im not surprised.

You are supposed to dispose of the poo into the toilet & then put the nappy in the bin.

it was only second time round i found that out, i had never read the instructions on the packet, nor had i seen anyone else do that. i would say many many people don’t comply - and it’s not always easy - a baby/toddler on solids will often bless you with a solid enough offering to enable it, but in the first 6 months the poo (TMI) was just everywhere on the nappy....it just wasn’t really feasible to try to get any in the toilet.


#18 Drat

Posted 09 October 2019 - 09:05 AM

I have two children and didn't know that about nappies...

#19 Ellie bean

Posted 09 October 2019 - 09:09 AM

View PostDrat, on 09 October 2019 - 09:05 AM, said:

I have two children and didn't know that about nappies...
I’ll fess up, I knew it with my second (read it on EB) but didn’t do it. Was too overwhelmed as it was (yes I know, it’s no excuse, I bet I’m not alone though)

#20 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 09 October 2019 - 10:03 AM

View PostPrincessPeach, on 08 October 2019 - 08:13 PM, said:

When you consider very few people realise you shouldnt just be dumping dirty nappies poo & all into the bin im not surprised.

You are supposed to dispose of the poo into the toilet & then put the nappy in the bin.

Never heard this before. And what about dog poo? That gets bagged and binned. The council doesn’t care about that.

Got a link to this rule?

Edited by ~LemonMyrtle~, 09 October 2019 - 10:04 AM.


#21 MissBehaving

Posted 09 October 2019 - 10:13 AM

.

Edited by MissBehaving, 16 October 2019 - 09:03 AM.


#22 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 09 October 2019 - 10:42 AM

View Postbabylove69, on 09 October 2019 - 10:13 AM, said:

Dog poo (any non-human waste) does not present the same bio-hazard the human poo does.

It's written on nappy packaging and probably on your council's website where the recycling information is.

Or here: https://www1.health....tsi-cnt-l-ch4.4

Our council website doesn’t say anything about it. It just says nappies go in the rubbish bin. And it’s impossible to get all poo, or even some of the poo, off a baby’s nappy.

Seems like a recommendation more than a rule.

#23 Lucrezia Borgia

Posted 09 October 2019 - 11:06 AM

View Post~LemonMyrtle~, on 09 October 2019 - 10:42 AM, said:



Our council website doesn’t say anything about it. It just says nappies go in the rubbish bin. And it’s impossible to get all poo, or even some of the poo, off a baby’s nappy.

Seems like a recommendation more than a rule.

agree...like i wrote above, who reads the packaging on nappies? i certainly didn’t .....if you use a wet wipe to wipe the baby’s bottom that doesn’t - in fact CANT - get flushed down the loo....so it’s got poo on it, and yeh...it’s impossible to get all the poo off the nappy anyway. i see parents at parks all the time changing their baby’s nappy in their prams, on a park bench - no where near a loo - the nappy gets bagged and binned. i don’t think this “rule” is widely observed.


#24 Etta

Posted 09 October 2019 - 11:26 AM

View PostPizzaPlease, on 08 October 2019 - 07:44 PM, said:

Not sure it's worth getting too upset about this until the current impasse is sorted though. I'm not sure any of the recycling being collected anywhere in the country is actually being recycled at the moment (as opposed to going into storage) so that's probably the more pressing issue.

I think it is worth thinking about now. The overseas recycling industry has collapsed partly because of contamination. We need to get it right now so that when they are collected again we are doing better than last time.

#25 Riotproof

Posted 09 October 2019 - 11:30 AM

The rule is completely and utterly ignored. Even when people know.




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