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DD8yo still filling a nappy every night


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#26 Hollycoddle

Posted 18 October 2019 - 01:41 PM

There are medications for it, I would look into that.  My sister was on them as a young child.  I would get rid of the nappies as they might be acting as a mental block.  But if she has always wet you should probably get her checked out for some sort of developmental issue.

#27 Crombek

Posted 18 October 2019 - 01:50 PM

How do people get their kids to increase day drinking? DS doesn’t drink much & I’m always talking about it at home, but every day he comes home from school with nearly a full drink bottle. He just doesn’t remember. And the teacher forgets to remind him. Or he tells me he used the bubbler. Or he just gets cross & digs his heels in.

Disclaimer - he has organisational difficulties at the best of times!

#28 Paddlepop

Posted 18 October 2019 - 02:27 PM

Crombek: Ask the teacher if he can keep his water bottle on his desk during class. We struggled with getting DD to drink sufficient water at school. Many days, including in summer, she'd come home with not having even open her water bottle for a sip. At the end of last year her regular teacher was away for two weeks and the replacement teacher allowed DD to have her water bottle on her desk instead of on a shared table that was at the side of the classroom. She came home with an empty water bottle and had started on her second water bottle most days for that fortnight. It was a breakthrough. It was the first time in 4 years of school this had happened.

The children have their water bottles in the classroom but on a shared table to the side with the idea being that the children may ask to get a drink at any time, and because the water is right there in the class that it will be minimally disruptive. That just didn't work for my DD (she has ASD and ADHD). She either wouldn't think of drinking or wouldn't be brave enough to ask to get a drink or wouldn't be able to work out how to ask because her brain was busy trying to do her schoolwork. This year we insisted that DD be allowed to have her water bottle on her desk. Teacher wasn't thrilled but we put the pressure on and she agreed. DD has been drinking an okay amount most days. Teacher has been away all week and DD has had various replacements all week. She's been coming home having drunk no water at all at school. Presumably the replacements haven't allowed her to have her water at her desk and have made her put it on the shared table.

#29 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 18 October 2019 - 04:09 PM

View PostNasty Teens, on 18 October 2019 - 09:57 AM, said:

Have you tried calling the continence helpline?
https://www.continen...e-helpline.html

Didn't know it existed! Will definitely give that a go too.

Thanks everyone for answering, I really appreciate it. And so does DD, knowing how many other kids are the same :)

I got her to drink about 1.5L this morning, so am going to try that for the next week and see if that helps put things around the right way. Like a PP, I think her hormones are completely back to front.

#30 Riotproof

Posted 18 October 2019 - 04:12 PM

View PostCrombek, on 18 October 2019 - 01:50 PM, said:

How do people get their kids to increase day drinking? DS doesn’t drink much & I’m always talking about it at home, but every day he comes home from school with nearly a full drink bottle. He just doesn’t remember. And the teacher forgets to remind him. Or he tells me he used the bubbler. Or he just gets cross & digs his heels in.

Disclaimer - he has organisational difficulties at the best of times!

I just made him have a big glass of water on waking, after going to the toilet. Then at home, I’d make him drink after school. The big part of it is holding it for longer than usual to allow your bladder to grow. That doesn’t work for school schedules..they go at recess, they go at lunch but after a certain age they don’t like them going during class. I actually think that’s what screwed ds up.

#31 mpoppins92

Posted 18 October 2019 - 07:24 PM

I teach a child who was having similar issues. We have the child’s drink bottle on their desk next to a chart reminding them to drink. They also wear a Fitbit that Mum has programmed to vibrate at various intervals throughout the day to remind the child to drink while they are trying increased fluids.

It’s not at all disruptive. If other kids asked, which they haven’t, I’d basically just say mind your beeswax!

#32 StartledFlamingo

Posted 18 October 2019 - 07:28 PM

We saw a continence nurse for DS 6 months ago. No amount of cold turkey was working.

I'm echoing other posters but the strategy was
1 he was ready, he was in control
2 up the water - 1 litre a day with most of it before the end of school and none after dinner. Mark on his drink bottle how much he needed to drink by school start, lunch, recess etc. Various threats & bribery to try to get him to drink it!
3 our job, initially, was to wake him up when the alarm went off - it was excruciatingly loud but he would still sleep through it. When he woke he had to turn it off quick as he could, go to the toilet, get changed, clean the mat, reset alarm and back to bed. If it went off 2ce in a night, same routine then turn it off for the rest of the night. Sleep is still important and it helped his buy-in to know he wasn't expected to do any more that night. My partner & DS swapped beds for a few weeks so I could be right there to wake him. After 3 weeks he would wake to the alarm himself. It was a competition with himself how fast he could turn it off.

Edited by StartledFlamingo, 18 October 2019 - 07:30 PM.


#33 Lifesgood

Posted 19 October 2019 - 02:22 PM

View PostLifesgood, on 17 October 2019 - 08:49 PM, said:

Its tricky isn't it. Both of my kids have been like this.

With DD we used a bedwetting alarm when she was 8 almost 9 (5 years ago) and now we are currently doing the same with DS (also 8 nearly 9).

DD was sorted within a week, DS I suspect may take a bit longer but already after 3 nights he had a completely dry night last night.

We have used Malem alarms for both kids, they cost $100-200 depending which model you opt for. You aren't supposed to but I use a pull up over undies while using an alarm to save changing sheets and PJs. Works well for us.

Cold turkey doesn't work, and is hard on everyone. I don't recommend trying it.
Just wanted to update that we have been using the Malem alarm for 6 nights now and DS has been dry for two of the 6, and has got up once a night on the other 4 nights.

#34 EsmeLennox

Posted 19 October 2019 - 02:33 PM

View PostAyr, on 18 October 2019 - 12:44 PM, said:

My Dr is the same. She won't prescribe the medication because she said once you stop the problem returns, it doesn't actually fix it it just stops it while using the medication. She recommended the alarm. I'm yet to look into it. She can get up herself through the night to go to the toilet and then still wee between then and morning. It's frustrating.

No, the medication doesn’t fix it. The point of the medication is to use it for school camps/sleepovers etc, not as a regular thing at home.

#35 Murderino

Posted 19 October 2019 - 04:56 PM

My 8 year old still has a nappy at night - lucky said child fits the junior Babylove nappy pants. I’ve tried to find a cloth night nappy big enough but no luck. My 8yo is really good at managing it discreetly so has sleep overs and camp with no concerns - I’ve tried to make it clear there is no embarrassment and it’s normal but it doesn’t help, they’re embarrassed.

He also has faecal continence issues so that is our priority and the clinic have told us not to worry about night dryness till we sort the faecal incontinence.

ETA
child sleeps so heavily that on occasions when we forgot the nappy they won’t remember me changing the bed and PJs in the middle of the night.

Edited by Murderino, 19 October 2019 - 05:15 PM.


#36 Ayr

Posted 19 October 2019 - 05:04 PM

View PostEsmeLennox, on 19 October 2019 - 02:33 PM, said:



No, the medication doesn’t fix it. The point of the medication is to use it for school camps/sleepovers etc, not as a regular thing at home.

She won't be doing either until we have fixed it.

We don't use a nappy or anything. She has a waterproof drop sheet. She just gets up and changes then pulls her sheets off when she does it. And goes back to bed with just the doona. I think nappies will make it worse. She will be dry for 2-4 nights then wet for, 3-6. It's different all the time.

Edited by Ayr, 19 October 2019 - 05:06 PM.


#37 Lifesgood

Posted 19 October 2019 - 05:16 PM

View PostMurderino, on 19 October 2019 - 04:56 PM, said:

My 8 year old still has a nappy at night - lucky said child fits the junior Babylove nappy pants. I’ve tried to find a cloth night nappy big enough but no luck. My 8yo is really good at managing it discreetly so has sleep overs and camp with no concerns - I’ve tried to make it clear there is no embarrassment and it’s normal but it doesn’t help, they’re embarrassed.

He also has faecal continence issues so that is our priority and the clinic have told us not to worry about night dryness till we sort the faecal incontinence.
Both of my kids have also had encopresis, they are definitely related (to night wetting I mean).

We finally got DS past his faecal incontinence earlier this year. It took us many years of work.

#38 Falala-llyjonk

Posted 20 October 2019 - 08:54 AM

My daughter is the same age and it's only very recently that she is dry overnight (mostly). So you're not alone, and she's not alone.

As with pps, we looked at drinking patterns and increased her intake in the morning and now she doesn't drink anything after 7:30pm. That seems to have made a difference, though the bigger difference is that she's suddenly started waking up by herself to go to the toilet.

We're living overseas and don't have access to night nappies so I am extremely glad of the improvement. Doing loads of washing in the middle of the night was getting tedious.

I'd still feel nervous if she went on a sleepover but otherwise I really think we've turned the corner and I hope it happens for your daughter too!

#39 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 22 October 2019 - 01:36 PM

Thanks everyone, I really do appreciate it. I've been getting DD to drink LOTS in the morning and that seems to be going OK (3 days in!). She's getting more compliant each day, which makes me think that maybe she's starting to be thirstier in the morning. She's still filling a nappy overnight, but at least this is a start.

Our friends have an alarm (their 9 yo DS used it recently and it did the trick), so am going to keep up the morning water for another week or so and then add in the alarm. Fingers crossed...

#40 Lifesgood

Posted 22 October 2019 - 05:15 PM

Good luck OP.

DS had another dry night last night.

#41 Falala-llyjonk

Posted 22 October 2019 - 11:34 PM

Yes, good luck! Also, my recommendation is to get at least two waterproof mattress protectors and layer them up with sheets between. That way if there's an accident you only need to peel back one set and not remake in the middle of the night.

#42 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 23 October 2019 - 06:48 AM

View PostFillyjonk, on 22 October 2019 - 11:34 PM, said:

Yes, good luck! Also, my recommendation is to get at least two waterproof mattress protectors and layer them up with sheets between. That way if there's an accident you only need to peel back one set and not remake in the middle of the night.

that is a VERY good idea :)

#43 Falala-llyjonk

Posted 26 October 2019 - 12:16 PM

Haha, happy to help!!

I can't claim the idea as my own - I am not sure where I picked it up from (probably EB) but it has saved my sanity and a bit of sleep many times.

How is it going OP?

#44 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 26 October 2019 - 02:57 PM

Well we are starting with drinking a litre or two in the morning. I was away for work for 2 days so of course DH didn't continue. So will start again tomorrow. Sigh.

And if that doesn't do the trick (knowing it probably won't) then we are going to start the alarm. I am just so stressed about work and a bunch of other things and already sleeping very badly so I'm not quite sure how I'm going to cope.

Oh, and we got some of the magic pills for sleepovers, but haven't tried them yet.

#45 crankybee

Posted 26 October 2019 - 03:41 PM

I saw an episode of UK Embarrassing Bodies and a child around the age of your DD had the same problem. He was low in one particular hormone that made you produce less urine at night. Once he went on medication it stopped immediately.

Please do everything to get this sorted for your child. I had this problem and it was absolutely the most demoralizing part of my childhood.

#46 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 07 November 2019 - 07:35 AM

Update - DD had her first dry night! We’ve been doing the ‘drink lots and lots of water in the morning’ - not with 100% accuracy as I’ve been travelling for work and DH forgets - but most days... and it seems to have worked. Hopefully it’s the start of lots of dry nights and not just a fluke. DD is very excited :) So big thank you to PP who suggested this approach.

#47 Lifesgood

Posted 26 November 2019 - 07:54 AM

Just popping in to say DS has been dry for 20 consecutive nights and we are ditching the alarm!! He is so proud of himself :wub:.

How is your DD going OP?

#48 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 01 December 2019 - 03:12 PM

That is so cool! I've been travelling for work and DD/DH have been absolutely hopeless at the drink lots in the morning' caper. Now that I'm back from all the travel, we'll try the alarm too, but I really want to reduce how much she's weeing at night too, it was making a difference until the 'drink lots in the morning' stopped.

#49 Lucrezia Bauble

Posted 27 December 2019 - 01:48 PM

i’m just reviving this thread - hope thats ok.

so we are two nights in with the alarm - both first and second night the alarm went off....he had wet his pull ups. both times i went in to him and he was sitting up in bed - awake - so it woke him (which is what it’s designed to do). i made him go to the toilet then but tbh there wasn’t much left. anyway - we will press on - but the thing is - he has no recollection of the alarm going off, of me coming in, talking to him and taking him to the loo. i kind of thought maybe part of the point was to get them trained to wake up and go to the loo if need be - but if he has no recollection i can’t see how this can work for him. he flat out denies it happened - i’m tempted to film it tonight to prove it to him (except that’s probably weird and a privacy issue)


#50 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 27 December 2019 - 02:28 PM

It took my DD2 14 nights to even wake - she slept through the whole thing until we went in and woke her up.
So he's doing well by comparison.

Incidentally she , now 19 , was complaining today that she has started waking at night when she leaks through her pad. Previously she just slept on a towel during her period.
The question was "Is this what it's like to be an adult, waking up to EVERYTHING?"

So deep sleepers find it much harder




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