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Where do socialites and influencers get their money?


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#1 alfoil hat

Posted 19 October 2019 - 02:41 PM

Vague title I know sorry, I guess it’s a vague question. The recent press about Margarita Tomovska has got me wondering. Where does she and others get their money? Do they have high paying jobs? Do they have lots of debt? Are they born into wealthy families? The amount of money some spend on designer goods boggles my mind!

#2 seayork2002

Posted 19 October 2019 - 02:43 PM

I presume sponsors/advertising?

#3 Ollie83

Posted 19 October 2019 - 02:48 PM

I’m assuming either through endorsement, sponsorship and the like but also that they had or still have normal jobs we just haven’t heard about it?

#4 MarciaB

Posted 19 October 2019 - 02:50 PM

Some have family wealth.

#5 kimasa

Posted 19 October 2019 - 02:55 PM

Endorsement, sponsors and advertising.

#6 born.a.girl

Posted 19 October 2019 - 03:04 PM

Maybe Mercerdes was one of her sponsors.


I'd never heard of her until I read about it.

#7 Chchgirl

Posted 19 October 2019 - 03:39 PM

Wow, I honestly was only thinking this the other day!

#8 TinCat🐱

Posted 19 October 2019 - 04:04 PM

I read an article a few months ago about a couple doing this.

They have no money. They lived with her parents who paid for everything while they refused to get jobs.

Not everything is as it seems sometimes.

Others get paid per post by the places they advertise.

#9 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 19 October 2019 - 04:19 PM

Theres some fo

View PostTinCat, on 19 October 2019 - 04:04 PM, said:


Others get paid per post by the places they advertise.

Some like hello Fresh give them a code and they pay them each week as long as x amount of people used the code the previous week.

I bet theres a large proportion of them not declaring correctly to ATO.

#10 ~J_F~

Posted 19 October 2019 - 04:22 PM

They don’t usually pay for the designer goods, they are often gifted them for free advertising.

#11 FuzzyChocolateToes

Posted 19 October 2019 - 04:33 PM

I was wondering this when I read about the criminal charges just this morning. The Merc was worth $450,000!

#12 IamtheMumma

Posted 19 October 2019 - 04:44 PM

They try to get stuff for free by bartering their "fame" as an exchange for services. There's a reddit/blog about people trying it on with restaurants. Unfortunately I can't recall the name but this is similar.

https://onemileatati...er-controversy/


I put "influencers" firmly in the scammers category.

#13 Heather11

Posted 19 October 2019 - 04:49 PM

Quote

I bet theres a large proportion of them not declaring correctly to ATO.

And do you have to declare sponsored products that you receive?

I know of a someone who I would say is a blogger/reviewer.  They promised to review products in exchange for the free product.

A few of us decided to follow the person to see what it was all about.  I tell you if I was the company I would be asking for the products back.  The reviews were things like, "Cant wait to use my .......", " I really like my ........".  For this type of review they received $1000s  in free product.

They go around telling everyone how much they make but I'm not sure if that is product value or money and I have a suspicion it wouldn't be declared.

#14 Bethlehem Babe

Posted 19 October 2019 - 05:06 PM

Gruen talked about influencers this week. Catch up on iview.

#15 Murderino

Posted 19 October 2019 - 05:08 PM

View PostIamtheMumma, on 19 October 2019 - 04:44 PM, said:

They try to get stuff for free by bartering their "fame" as an exchange for services. There's a reddit/blog about people trying it on with restaurants. Unfortunately I can't recall the name but this is similar.

https://onemileatati...er-controversy/


I put "influencers" firmly in the scammers category.

Im with the hotelier telling them to bugger off!

There is also this one where someone with 55000 followers asked for free wedding photos.  This article doesn’t have the full shots of all correspondence but you get the idea. I applaud the photographers.
https://metro.co.uk/...-free-10104103/

#16 can'tstayaway

Posted 19 October 2019 - 05:20 PM

View PostFuzzyChocolateToes, on 19 October 2019 - 04:33 PM, said:

I was wondering this when I read about the criminal charges just this morning. The Merc was worth $450,000!
The article I read said the car was worth $250k. It also mentioned that the police were initially I interested in her passenger who was a known motorcycle gang member whom the believed to be armed with a weapon.

I wouldn’t call her an ‘influencer’. When I think of influencers, I think of the Kardashians etc.

#17 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 19 October 2019 - 05:25 PM

View Postcan, on 19 October 2019 - 05:20 PM, said:


I wouldn’t call her an ‘influencer’. When I think of influencers, I think of the Kardashians etc.

Theres a heck of a lot of people calling themselves influencers.

I would define 'influencer' as somebody who markets things on a blog or insta as their way of earning income.

I sometimes browse through mummy  blogs but Im more interested in reading about things like places they travelled with kids or craft they made than buying a product.

#18 Kiwi Bicycle

Posted 19 October 2019 - 05:29 PM

Influcers use social media platforms such as Instagram, Youtube, Facebook etc. Low key ones will get gifted products to review or just wear/ use in a photo or video. Ones with larger audiences will get free product plus cash to do the same.
They also sell merch ( mostly clothing) via merchandising companies that simply print a design onto a garment to order and influcer earns a commission. Same with discount codes, the influencer earns a commission from sales using the code. Youtubers earn money for Adsense for ads shown in a video.
Influencers can also do collaborations with companies to design/ add their name to a clothing range, makeup etc and earn off this. A big contravesary was beauty Youtuber Nikki Tutorials was only paid $50K one off for a eyeshadow pallet made by a company who turned around and didn't sell the same formulation that Nikki approved.
They also might be offered rentals or leases on products/ houses/ cars etc to be featured.
I worked in marketing 10 years ago, and it's changed soo much in 10 years. I wouldn't know where to start now.

#19 #YKG

Posted 19 October 2019 - 05:55 PM

Socialites tend to come from wealthy family’s.

Influencers can get paid various ways. Youtuber’s can monetise their videos, but you have to have over 10k subscribers now for you be able to do it. Pewdiepie makes something like $10-15 mil a year from YouTube.

Instagram they either get paid in product of money for posts. The higher your engagement the more money you can ask (followers aren’t a massive factor as they can be bought easily).

Social media isn’t an easy way to make money, most people don’t earn much, most are paid in product so yeah they tend to do patreon, gofundme etc to find their unrealistic lives that they even can’t afford.

#20 alfoil hat

Posted 19 October 2019 - 07:47 PM

I get the sponsorship of influencers, but I am surprised at the value of the goods they flaunt. You can’t live off products, surely there must be significant income coming in too. You’d think it’s only the top 0.05% or so that have the astronomical incomes from sponsorships that are touted sometimes. Specifically I was thinking of Margarita’s merc. I just can’t imagine a car brand giving that away, so say it was a significant discount, even 50%, that’s still $120k to come up with. I guess the bikie connection is the missing link. It’s all so weird to me.

#21 Givingitanothergo

Posted 19 October 2019 - 08:10 PM

I have no answers... I’m early 40’s with a 21 year old niece that lives by it and asks me the same questions... travelling the world, all the best stuff.. girls her age - how do they afford it? I don’t have the answers except to tell her it won’t last forever and there will be another hot person next week

#22 JoanJett

Posted 19 October 2019 - 08:21 PM

Money from:
- paid posts, depending on followers, that can be several hundred per post to thousands/tens of thousands
- money per "swipe code" used by followers
- free goods - many in the "mummyblogger" sphere have free groceries, household goods and things like clothes, even car "ambassadorships"
- on-selling gifted goods
- comped meals/hotel stays/flights
- gifted "lifestyle" goods, like hair/makeup/cosmetic procedures etc
- parlaying into their own lines of cheap clothes etc

They should be declaring it in their posts, the ACCC have guidelines, but often the declarations are buried in subsequent comments or with amorphous hashtags.

https://www.abc.net....y-rules/8315962

They should be declaring it as income, and I think they're on the "target list" for the ATO this year.

I never quite get who believes the "I only endorse products I believe in" schtick on social media.  

The ones I question are those who expose every detail of their kids' lives to make the money.  That makes me uncomfortable.  There are some young children with pretty big internet footprints.

ETA:  often the designer goods are hired.  There are plenty of businesses available.  I categorise "socialites" and "influencers" differently, although there is increasing crossover.

Edited by JoanJett, 19 October 2019 - 08:23 PM.


#23 red_squirrel

Posted 19 October 2019 - 08:26 PM

View Postalfoil hat, on 19 October 2019 - 07:47 PM, said:

I get the sponsorship of influencers, but I am surprised at the value of the goods they flaunt. You can’t live off products, surely there must be significant income coming in too. You’d think it’s only the top 0.05% or so that have the astronomical incomes from sponsorships that are touted sometimes. Specifically I was thinking of Margarita’s merc. I just can’t imagine a car brand giving that away, so say it was a significant discount, even 50%, that’s still $120k to come up with. I guess the bikie connection is the missing link. It’s all so weird to me.

It’s no different to a company buying an ad slot on mainstream TV. Probably cheaper.It is essentially product placement. Except the you tubers and instagramers they choose have a much bigger audience than the traditional mainstream shows/publications. So I can see why they would do it.

#24 Tokra

Posted 19 October 2019 - 09:24 PM

View PostIamtheMumma, on 19 October 2019 - 04:44 PM, said:

They try to get stuff for free by bartering their "fame" as an exchange for services. There's a reddit/blog about people trying it on with restaurants. Unfortunately I can't recall the name but this is similar.

https://onemileatati...er-controversy/


I put "influencers" firmly in the scammers category.

The White Moose Cafe makes some hilarious stuff happen.

#25 FuzzyChocolateToes

Posted 19 October 2019 - 11:22 PM

The Age definitely said $450,000 - it stood out to me as an extraordinarily expensive car.
https://www.google.c...017-p531q1.html
I don't know which is correct, but either way it's a lot of money!

Edited by FuzzyChocolateToes, 19 October 2019 - 11:30 PM.





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