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Should I get my tubes removed?


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29 replies to this topic

#1 gracie1978

Posted 14 November 2019 - 07:16 PM

Having a c section and def don't want to have anymore children ever!
My body couldn't cope anyway, 8 weeks to go and can hardly walk.

Anyway, my OB has suggested removed the tubes instead of getting them tied, as it can reduce the risk of ovarian cancer.

Has anyone had this done, thoughts?
I'm inclined towards doing it as my good friend has just been diagnosed with it :(

#2 little lion

Posted 14 November 2019 - 07:18 PM

I had mine done last year at the same time as endometrial ablation. No regrets.

#3 Froyohoho

Posted 14 November 2019 - 07:23 PM

I had both tubes removed after a ruptured ectopic pregnancy. Never regretted it for a second.

#4 Staying Strange

Posted 14 November 2019 - 07:28 PM

I'm a brca2 carrier. I've had my ovaries and fallopian tubes taken out... Do a little different to just tubes out.

Is there anything specific that you'd like to know/ are worried about.

It was a day procedure. Was only at the hospital for a few hours. Surgery was done laproscopically with 3 tiny incisions (1x1cm, 2x 0.5cm).
I had 2 weeks off work.no driving for 10 days.it went well. Was very straight forward.recovery was quick and for me, my ovarian cancer risk is now down from 20% to just over 1% so very worthwhile for me.

#5 The new me

Posted 14 November 2019 - 07:42 PM

I had my tubes tied last year
Since then I have learned about the ovarian cancer risk reducing by removing the tubes and wish I knew it at the time.  Would have done it.

Ovarian canve is one of the hardest to detect early and is a real fear (have a few issues in that department) so I would take the opportunity to reduce

Good luck

#6 Soontobegran

Posted 14 November 2019 - 07:46 PM

This is a tough one.
Having a salpingectomy somewhat reduces the incidence of ovarian cancer but whilst your ovaries are intact the risk is still there. As a form of contraception I believe it to be less dramatic than a tubal ligation in terms of negative side effects but there are women who still have these side effects when left with ovaries and no tubes.

It is a very personal decision but I think I would carefully weigh up my risk factors before I made it.
If you carried the gene it would be a waste of time just removing the tubes, if you have low risk factors then perhaps the best form of contraception would be your partner having a vasectomy.

Good luck, I would definitely have more dialogue with your doctor and your partner.

#7 gracie1978

Posted 14 November 2019 - 07:46 PM

I can't really see a downside.

Just curious to understand other people's experiences.

Staying Strange, glad you've been able to reduce your cancer risk.

The new me, apparently tied tubes also decrease the risk.

#8 Soontobegran

Posted 14 November 2019 - 07:58 PM

Sorry, I did not want to sound negative but I have had both now.
I had a tubal ligation which was the very worst decision I have ever made in terms of my post procedure health.
I also know people who have had a salpingectomy who had similar side effects as I had post ligation.

I would be so much more encouraging of the idea if it was due to an increased risk of ovarian cancer but that being said this is just my point of view as someone who has been through it.

I don't mean to just pour water on the idea but there sure can be a downside.

Edited by Soontobegran, 14 November 2019 - 07:59 PM.


#9 kadoodle

Posted 14 November 2019 - 09:22 PM

Would it be worth going the whole hog and having a hysterectomy? No more periods is pretty enticing.

#10 Apple14

Posted 14 November 2019 - 09:32 PM

View Postlittle lion, on 14 November 2019 - 07:18 PM, said:

I had mine done last year at the same time as endometrial ablation. No regrets.
This.

#11 gracie1978

Posted 14 November 2019 - 09:35 PM

I've heard lots of stories about tubal ligation issues
But maybe tube removal isn't as common yet?

One woman in a MG told us all it had ruined her life, so much pain etc but if was unrelated, there was an issue from her c section.

#12 gracie1978

Posted 14 November 2019 - 09:36 PM

View Postkadoodle, on 14 November 2019 - 09:22 PM, said:

Would it be worth going the whole hog and having a hysterectomy? No more periods is pretty enticing.

Wouldn't that put you sent risk of early menopause?

#13 kadoodle

Posted 14 November 2019 - 09:42 PM

View Postgracie1978, on 14 November 2019 - 09:36 PM, said:



Wouldn't that put you sent risk of early menopause?

Or get it out of the way at a time of your own choosing.

#14 Froyohoho

Posted 14 November 2019 - 09:45 PM

If the ovaries are removed then yes (but it's a deliberate surgically induced menopause), but isn't that the point? If the uterus is removed but not the ovaries there's no more periods but that's not the same as menopause as the ovaries are still functioning.

#15 Oriental lily

Posted 14 November 2019 - 09:51 PM

I looked in to getting a hyster if I needed an elective c section in my last pregnancy .

It makes recovery and the surgery much more risky . They will only do it under certain situations .

#16 IShallWearMidnight

Posted 14 November 2019 - 10:15 PM

Mine were removed in 2017, during my last cesarean.

No regrets (well, I wanted more kids but it would have killed me, so this was the best option)

#17 wilding

Posted 14 November 2019 - 10:23 PM

View PostFroyo, on 14 November 2019 - 07:23 PM, said:

I had both tubes removed after a ruptured ectopic pregnancy. Never regretted it for a second.

Oh Froyo, sorry to hear about that.

I hope you don't find my comment insensitive or anything. I found out several years ago that both my tubes have intensive scaring on them and this is a big concern of mine so something I've been considering for awhile now.

#18 Froyohoho

Posted 14 November 2019 - 10:27 PM

No not insensitive at all. It was a no brainer for me, as I wasn't getting pregnant without IVF anyway and did not want to run the risk of another ectopic.

#19 Sancti-claws

Posted 14 November 2019 - 10:49 PM

A girlfriend of mine who had horrific pregnancies and far more dangerous births asked for her tubes to be done while the (pre-arranged for risk) ceasar was undertaken - but as it was a Catholic hospital they refused.  Late 1990s.

#20 gracie1978

Posted 15 November 2019 - 06:27 AM

I've got another 7 weeks to think about it.

It's really helpful to hear from people who have had it done, hadn't considered that it reduces the ectopic risk as well.

#21 kitkatswing

Posted 15 November 2019 - 08:02 AM

I had mine removed at the start of September, also had Mirena put in to control periods.

No regrets!!! Wish I had done it earlier :)

#22 MincePieMasterchef

Posted 15 November 2019 - 10:28 AM

sorry to hear about your friend OP

#23 MincePieMasterchef

Posted 15 November 2019 - 10:29 AM

View Postkadoodle, on 14 November 2019 - 09:42 PM, said:

Or get it out of the way at a time of your own choosing.
Not an expert but I gather there is a risk to your bones through early menopause so you wouldnt want to remove ovaries or uterus unless medically necessary.  (Have read a bit on topic as my periods suck)

Edited by WannabeMasterchef, 15 November 2019 - 10:32 AM.


#24 Beancat

Posted 15 November 2019 - 10:44 AM

Had mine removed after my 3rd c section

No regrets at all.  Like you I knew it was my last

A no brainer

#25 kadoodle

Posted 15 November 2019 - 03:47 PM

View PostWannabeMasterchef, on 15 November 2019 - 10:29 AM, said:


Not an expert but I gather there is a risk to your bones through early menopause so you wouldnt want to remove ovaries or uterus unless medically necessary.  (Have read a bit on topic as my periods suck)

I’ve heard that, too. I guess it would depend if you’re 35 and got ages of bone density to solidify, or 45 and about to hit it anyway.




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