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#26 laridae

Posted 17 November 2019 - 07:46 PM

My eldest did kindergym and swimming in preschool. We dropped gym in prep and took it back up again in grade 1, along with Joey scouts. She wanted to drop swimming too, but we kept it up though did change swim schools. Added dance towards the end of grade 2 (just a casual class), moved up to cubs, and added taekwondo at the start of grade 3. Got invited to do competitive gymnastics, but we couldn't get to to all the classes as they were days I worked, and she'd been asking to do ice skating, so we added that instead. Next year she wants to do the competitive gymnastics (and I can change my work days now so it's doable) and keep all the others! We'll see how we go.

My youngest is in preschool and does the same as her sister except scouts as she's not old enough, mainly as she does it at the same time (except gymnastics) so she may as well. She's got a lot of energy. She'll start Joey scouts next year. She wants to drop taekwondo, dance and gymnastics though, she loves ice skating and swimming. Gymnastics she likes, but she doesn't like the coach that much, and they do a lot of sitting and watching which is not her thing. I'm trying to get her into where her sister goes for next year, they have huge wait lists so we'll see.

#27 PrincessPeach

Posted 17 November 2019 - 08:10 PM

It's so kid dependant.

My FYOS kid does swimming, plus has speech therapy & thats enough for him.

But i know there are kids in his class who do a lot more activities: nippers, auskick, soccer, basketball, martial arts & tennis are some of the sports. There is also one kid in his class doing triathlons, but the gym nearby the school has a specific kid triathlon group.



#28 EPZ

Posted 17 November 2019 - 08:29 PM

We did swimming and added basketball term 3. My son was tied first term in!
It worked out well because his group of school friends started bball together. May benefit to see if he ends up wanting to start something with friend/s.

DD is a bit of a pocket rocket and stamina to burn so she did extra a bit earlier.

On a side note, I met someone who’s 9 year old is doing 20 hours of gym a week (eek!) so a couple of activities probably won’t kill him.

#29 marley*and*me

Posted 17 November 2019 - 08:54 PM

View Postgracie1978, on 17 November 2019 - 09:36 AM, said:

DS is five and starting school next year.

He currently does swimming and gymnastics on Saturdays.
Piano once day a week and speech one morning a week.

He really wants to go to scouts and ninja class but I've told him he needs to swap out another activity (not swimming).  He's not keen to do that yet as he likes everything.

I've put piano on hold for the first term of next year as we settle into twin baby life and FYOS.
I can't wait to drop speech, it's so expensive and I'm expected to watch and be involved.  None of us like swimming either, but I guess we are just stuck with it till around ten.

I quite like his activities where I get 30 min to myself to make calls, do life admin or scroll EB and FB.

Why on earth would you be stuck with swimming until the kid is 10?  That is a massive waste of money and taking kids to sports they hate is just painful.  

My eldest stopped lesson at the end of prep and now at 12 can still manage to swim a pool length but I wouldn’t say he has a perfect stroke, but can certainly save himself from drowning.  Next one stopped at the end of grade 1 but at 10 can still do 50m of each stroke and can certainly save herself and others if they were to drown.  Both are very confidant is the surf and often go bodyboarding. They both asked to stop when they did and I was happy to stop with them.

Edited by marley*and*me, 17 November 2019 - 08:56 PM.


#30 seayork2002

Posted 17 November 2019 - 09:01 PM

I am glad ds did swimming but glader now he has stopped, Scouts is the best thing ever!

#31 EPZ

Posted 17 November 2019 - 09:03 PM

I disagree. Swimming is great for their body especially if your child is doing gym, dance, sport. It is a cardio workout and weightless. Helps with breathing and works your whole body.

My 10 year old does fitness squad an hour a week just because it is good for her body.

Edited by EPZ, 17 November 2019 - 09:04 PM.


#32 seayork2002

Posted 17 November 2019 - 09:07 PM

View PostEPZ, on 17 November 2019 - 09:03 PM, said:

I disagree. Swimming is great for their body especially if your child is doing gym, dance, sport. It is a cardio workout and weightless. Helps with breathing and works your whole body.

My 10 year old does fitness squad an hour a week just because it is good for her body.

Maybe it really is just me but I am unconfortable with children being concerned about fitness.

I like activities that has a variety of things if that is what the child enjoys

#33 gracie1978

Posted 17 November 2019 - 09:13 PM

View Postmarley*and*me, on 17 November 2019 - 08:54 PM, said:



Why on earth would you be stuck with swimming until the kid is 10?  That is a massive waste of money and taking kids to sports they hate is just painful.  

My eldest stopped lesson at the end of prep and now at 12 can still manage to swim a pool length but I wouldn’t say he has a perfect stroke, but can certainly save himself from drowning.  Next one stopped at the end of grade 1 but at 10 can still do 50m of each stroke and can certainly save herself and others if they were to drown.  Both are very confidant is the surf and often go bodyboarding. They both asked to stop when they did and I was happy to stop with them.

Being able to swim strongly is something we value even if we don't enjoy the process.
It's also a great sport for a kid with hyper mobility.  
We have come a long way, 18 months ago he screamed at every lesson, now he negotiates what snack he will get afterwards.  With everything else he doesn't need extra encouragement (bribery).

He has zero natural ability.  Fortunately he doesn't seem worried about being in a class with three year olds.
Getting this kid to the point that he can get back into shore safely if he's pulled out by a rip, is going to take years.  I was much the same, needed about six years of lessons to be an adequate swimmer.  If he also needs 20+ driving lessons like I did, I'm going to be so much nicer about it than my parents were...


#34 marley*and*me

Posted 17 November 2019 - 09:16 PM

View PostEPZ, on 17 November 2019 - 09:03 PM, said:

I disagree. Swimming is great for their body especially if your child is doing gym, dance, sport. It is a cardio workout and weightless. Helps with breathing and works your whole body.

My 10 year old does fitness squad an hour a week just because it is good for her body.

I don’t disagree it is great fitness, etc, but if the kid is confidant in the water and can swim a lap and can save themselves why on earth would you force them to do something they hate until they are 10 (and you hate taking them to and costs a fortune).

There are plenty of other things they can do for fitness other than swimming that they could enjoy.

#35 marley*and*me

Posted 17 November 2019 - 09:19 PM

View Postgracie1978, on 17 November 2019 - 09:13 PM, said:



Being able to swim strongly is something we value even if we don't enjoy the process.
It's also a great sport for a kid with hyper mobility.  
We have come a long way, 18 months ago he screamed at every lesson, now he negotiates what snack he will get afterwards.  With everything else he doesn't need extra encouragement (bribery).

He has zero natural ability.  Fortunately he doesn't seem worried about being in a class with three year olds.
Getting this kid to the point that he can get back into shore safely if he's pulled out by a rip, is going to take years.  I was much the same, needed about six years of lessons to be an adequate swimmer.  If he also needs 20+ driving lessons like I did, I'm going to be so much nicer about it than my parents were...

With more expalination this becomes a different scenario.  If it does take u til 10 to be able to save himself then yes, great, that is what he needs.  Most kids I know by 6/7 can happily swim around and save themselves.  Lessons are just a painful way of spending 30min by that age if they don’t need to be there.

Ps, maybe he will surprise you and learn faster than you think he will!  My kids surprise me all the time with how fast they can catch on with things.

Edited by marley*and*me, 17 November 2019 - 09:22 PM.


#36 LucyGoose

Posted 17 November 2019 - 09:24 PM

My DS is 4.5yrs old and does swimming.  He’ll do the same next year in FYOS.

He’s my third child,  and we are also of the opinion that one activity is enough in FYOS.



#37 EPZ

Posted 17 November 2019 - 09:36 PM

Yeah fair enough,  if they hate it.
My DD wanted to stop and then changed her mind.

They have swimming sports grade 4,5,6 and it’s a bonus she can confidently swim butterfly.

We do it for the weightless exercise, more than anything, she does gymnastics so it’s especially great for her muscles. Like a supplement for us I guess.

A lot of my friends regret stopping too early as a few years later their kids were not confident anymore (they didn’t hate it though). Swimming casually at the local pool can help prevent that anyway.

Edited by EPZ, 17 November 2019 - 09:41 PM.


#38 ekbaby

Posted 17 November 2019 - 10:00 PM

There is no way that I would say “being able to swim a lap/50m” = being able to save themselves

#39 Fluffy Potatoes

Posted 17 November 2019 - 11:49 PM

Ds1 (7) gets to choose one extra curricular per term and  currently does swimming (our non neg) and ju jitsu. In the past he has done gymnastics, milo cricket and little athletics. He has requested to do all (except swimming) of them at various times because his friends or family members were and we give him the opportunity to have a go. Ju jitsu has lasted the distance all this year, but he has just started talking about trying AFL (they’ve been doing it for PE) or some kind of dance next year.
FYOS we dropped everything except for swimming.

#40 MissMilla

Posted 18 November 2019 - 02:26 AM

DS 5 is doing gymnastics and swimming this year. I basically sent him to trial lessons in everything he was interested in and he had to pick 2.
I pushed for swimming and he started when he was 3, but once he was able to swim one pool length on his own i told him he can drop it if he wants, because he hated it at the start. He really loves it now though and wants to continue.
He also plays the drums a bit and the piano, but only at home with DH for now, because i think hes still a bit young to focus on it for a whole lesson and practise all the time.

DD does swimming because she has to. And ballet, because her cousin took her to a class once and she loved it. Shes only 3 though.

#41 gracie1978

Posted 18 November 2019 - 06:20 AM

View Postmarley*and*me, on 17 November 2019 - 09:19 PM, said:



With more expalination this becomes a different scenario.  If it does take u til 10 to be able to save himself then yes, great, that is what he needs.  Most kids I know by 6/7 can happily swim around and save themselves.  Lessons are just a painful way of spending 30min by that age if they don’t need to be there.

Ps, maybe he will surprise you and learn faster than you think he will!  My kids surprise me all the time with how fast they can catch on with things.

Probably a good reason to not make snap judgements on other people's parenting decisions... You have no way of knowing the full situation.

Resigning myself to years of swimming was also based on research that shows children are starting to learn earlier and are stopping earlier.  The impact is a heap of 12 year olds who are not as safe in the water as they or their parents think they are.

Regardless his progress continues at a snail's pace.  I've been shocked by how quickly he has picked up piano.  We started at 4.5 and only because I thought it would help with his fine motor skills issues.
Hoping to transfer him to a smaller instrument before we have to buy a piano.


#42 seayork2002

Posted 18 November 2019 - 06:45 AM

View Postgracie1978, on 18 November 2019 - 06:20 AM, said:



Probably a good reason to not make snap judgements on other people's parenting decisions... You have no way of knowing the full situation.

Resigning myself to years of swimming was also based on research that shows children are starting to learn earlier and are stopping earlier.  The impact is a heap of 12 year olds who are not as safe in the water as they or their parents think they are.

Regardless his progress continues at a snail's pace.  I've been shocked by how quickly he has picked up piano.  We started at 4.5 and only because I thought it would help with his fine motor skills issues.
Hoping to transfer him to a smaller instrument before we have to buy a piano.

No one is fully safe in the water even if they have lifelong lessons

#43 countrychic29

Posted 18 November 2019 - 10:59 AM

Just on the swimming, my DDs started at 2/3 years of age and will continue until they can swim 500m, preferably obtain their Bronze medallion so they might help others in trouble as well.
- may seem extreme to some, but growing up myself it was non negotiable and i thank my parents for continuing lessons long past when i could 'save myself'

We spend a lot of time in the ocean and as an ex swimming teacher it is not nearly enough to swim a lap or 2.
Let alone the importance of correct technique so that you don't tire easily when you are panicked etc.

#44 JomoMum

Posted 18 November 2019 - 11:26 AM

Our son is first year of school, has just turned 6 this month.

He does 1 x 30min swimming lesson mid week.
April-August he does soccer through our local club, though it’s not a full on comp, they just play for fun
1 x 40 min training mid week and 1 x 40 game Sat AM
August-March he does 1 x 30 min karate session midweek

We chose these activities based on a few different factors
- weather/temp during the summer months (too hot to be outside)
- social skills playing in a team
- discipline and self confidence
- swimming for obvious water safety

#45 3babygirls

Posted 18 November 2019 - 12:00 PM

View Postekbaby, on 17 November 2019 - 10:00 PM, said:

There is no way that I would say “being able to swim a lap/50m” = being able to save themselves

Oh yes.

Swimming will be compulsory here until they can either swim like 500+ metres confidently or do bronze medallion etc.

I worked as a life guard for many years and there was a huge amount of kids aged 8+ who I had to rescue and their parents were surprised because they are 'good' swimmers and can swim 25/50 metres..

Might be good enough for some, but we spend our lives in or around the water. I'm not taking that chance.

#46 PrincessPeach

Posted 18 November 2019 - 01:23 PM

View PostDrat, on 18 November 2019 - 12:00 PM, said:



Oh yes.

Swimming will be compulsory here until they can either swim like 500+ metres confidently or do bronze medallion etc.

I worked as a life guard for many years and there was a huge amount of kids aged 8+ who I had to rescue and their parents were surprised because they are 'good' swimmers and can swim 25/50 metres..

Might be good enough for some, but we spend our lives in or around the water. I'm not taking that chance.

So true - i can easily swim a lap of the pool, swimming in the open ocean is a totally different thing & i struggle badly.

#47 annodam

Posted 18 November 2019 - 01:58 PM

And yet I was laughed at on here when I said my eldest can swim perfect butterfly & where would one use such a ridiculous stroke.
Well butterfly comes in very handy in choppy open waters.



EFS:

Edited by annodam, 18 November 2019 - 01:58 PM.


#48 EPZ

Posted 18 November 2019 - 09:06 PM

I wouldn’t be laughing at you.  Butterfly is very beneficial.

My kids had to get to level 10, to swim every stroke properly,  which took them until at least 9 YO. Then Pre squad is where they swim laps for an hour, practicing all of those strokes. Adding in safety weeks - swimming fully clothed and diving practice from the blocks.  
No one at my swim school has finished their levels by 6-7 years old and many have pools at home.


#49 Lady Monteagle

Posted 19 November 2019 - 07:36 AM

I'll put in a plug for music lessons.  FYOS happens to be an ideal time for (interested) kids to learn an instrument.  By this age my kids were learning two each.  Bands & orchestras are really excellent arenas for teamwork, leadership etc.

#50 Lou-bags

Posted 19 November 2019 - 09:06 AM

My 6yo (FYOS, preprimary, first year full time school) does nippers at the surf club on the weekend and swimming lessons after school one day a week.

When he was in kindy (5 day fortnight school) he did BMX racing. Which we might go back to after nippers finishes.

These have been/are all great ways for him to burn off his excess physical energy and seem to help him release a bit of the build up of emotion from school.




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