Jump to content

School starting age study


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 EPZ

Posted 20 November 2019 - 03:52 PM

I know there is always a huge debate on this issue on EB.

There is an article on Kidspot,  that some may be interested  in reading regarding a study on school starting age.



#2 just roses

Posted 20 November 2019 - 04:38 PM

The article in Kidspot is very weak and gives absolutely no information about the study itself - sample size, how it was conducted. There's a link to a Herald Sun article, but it's behind a paywall. I have found references from earlier in the year from the report author and this is from the abstract. I'd be keen to read more, if I could find more. If it's just the study listed below, then I'm not fully convinced when there are so many variables and education has evolved over time.

We investigate the long lasting effects on behaviour of relative age at school. We conduct an online incentivised survey with a sample of 1007 adults, who were born at most two months before or after the school entry cut-off date in four Australian states. We find those who were among the oldest in the classroom throughout their school years display higher self-confidence, are more willing to enter in some form of competition, declare taking more risk in a range of domains in their life and are more trusting of other people, compared to those who were among the youngest.

Edited by just roses, 20 November 2019 - 04:40 PM.


#3 Dianalynch

Posted 20 November 2019 - 04:48 PM

It’s a silly study, as it accepts the premise of an industrial model of education where kids can only start at one time a year, or wait a whole year. A study on changing the model of education to kids starting school when they are ready no matter the time of year - that would be interesting

#4 just roses

Posted 20 November 2019 - 05:02 PM

Also, the lead author says the report shouldn't be used by parents as a basis for holding kids back:

“What happens usually is the advantage is primarily visible in primary school, and fades away in high school and at university,” he says.

“Keeping children back is a trade off. There is often a substantial cost in one additional year of daycare and it’s not clear that the benefits for your child will make it worth it. Instead, there will be an advantage at the start which will on average gradually fade away,” he says.

“Educators should be aware of this when assessing potential: is a child doing well because they are relatively old? Or are they invisible in the classroom partly because they are relatively young?”


#5 Backtoschoolchef

Posted 20 November 2019 - 06:01 PM

View Postjust roses, on 20 November 2019 - 04:38 PM, said:

We investigate the long lasting effects on behaviour of relative age at school. We conduct an online incentivised survey with a sample of 1007 adults, who were born at most two months before or after the school entry cut-off date in four Australian states. We find those who were among the oldest in the classroom throughout their school years display higher self-confidence, are more willing to enter in some form of competition, declare taking more risk in a range of domains in their life and are more trusting of other people, compared to those who were among the youngest.

That gives me a mental image of the oldest in the classroom more likely to be stung by an online scam!

I bet the questions were ambiguously worded.

Also, does how one feels about themselves in an online study accurately reflect how they behave in the real world?

Edited by WannabeMasterchef, 20 November 2019 - 06:05 PM.


#6 Backtoschoolchef

Posted 20 November 2019 - 06:03 PM

View PostDianalynch, on 20 November 2019 - 04:48 PM, said:

It’s a silly study, as it accepts the premise of an industrial model of education where kids can only start at one time a year, or wait a whole year. A study on changing the model of education to kids starting school when they are ready no matter the time of year - that would be interesting
SA (public)  just moved away from that about 5 years ago. I believe its because it was very disruptive having new kids all the time both to students and teachers.

#7 Dianalynch

Posted 20 November 2019 - 06:15 PM

View PostWannabeMasterchef, on 20 November 2019 - 06:03 PM, said:


SA (public)  just moved away from that about 5 years ago. I believe its because it was very disruptive having new kids all the time both to students and teachers.

How disappointing to go back to a model that doesn’t work for kids because it’s easier...if the new system didn’t work, maybe try something else, but to go backwards? That’s a shame.

ETA our school has 20% turn over every year, one prep teacher had 2 kids at the end of the year that had started with her. So I’ve seen it managed very well.

Edited by Dianalynch, 20 November 2019 - 06:17 PM.


#8 Heather11

Posted 20 November 2019 - 06:31 PM

View PostDianalynch, on 20 November 2019 - 06:15 PM, said:

How disappointing to go back to a model that doesn’t work for kids because it’s easier...if the new system didn’t work, maybe try something else, but to go backwards? That’s a shame.

ETA our school has 20% turn over every year, one prep teacher had 2 kids at the end of the year that had started with her. So I’ve seen it managed very well.

It wasn't a new system that didn't work.  It had always been that way in SA.  Well at least as far back as 1978 when I started.  

You basically started the term after you turned 5.

In 2013 they changed to one intake.  It is interesting to note however, that many Catholic and Ind schools changed back a couple of years ago to take in a mid year intake again.

#9 seayork2002

Posted 20 November 2019 - 07:19 PM

I presume there will be kids 4 years 364 days old and then another who is 5.

Yes for example so there can't be a blanket answer?

And two kids the exact same age being different in development?

#10 PrincessPeach

Posted 20 November 2019 - 07:50 PM

View Postjust roses, on 20 November 2019 - 05:02 PM, said:

[size=3][font=arial,helvetica,sans-serif]Also, the lead author says the report shouldn't be used by parents as a basis for holding kids back:

I have a feeling that point will be skipped over.

#11 Backtoschoolchef

Posted 21 November 2019 - 01:10 PM

View PostDianalynch, on 20 November 2019 - 06:15 PM, said:

How disappointing to go back to a model that doesn’t work for kids because it’s easier...if the new system didn’t work, maybe try something else, but to go backwards? That’s a shame.

ETA our school has 20% turn over every year, one prep teacher had 2 kids at the end of the year that had started with her. So I’ve seen it managed very well.

The one intake has only been in a few years here so I think its too early to know if it doesn't work or not.  Anecdotally its working pretty well for my 2 older kids who are at the youngest end of their class.

DS will be one of the oldest assuming its still the same system when he goes through so I will see the other side of it.

Edited by WannabeMasterchef, 21 November 2019 - 01:14 PM.





6 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 6 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.