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Best read of 2019?


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#76 Lou-bags

Posted 23 November 2019 - 09:17 AM

 Riotproof, on 22 November 2019 - 09:04 PM, said:

Burial rites was a hard read, but worthwhile I think. The names made it hard for me, but that is my on myopia.

I think in this case listening to the audiobook really enhanced the book for me- the names were beautifully handled by the narrator who has such a lovely voice.

I was sad when I finished it.

#77 born.a.girl

Posted 23 November 2019 - 11:36 AM

 Lou-bags, on 23 November 2019 - 09:15 AM, said:

I know!

The only other books that have had the same fate from me are Tizzy’s book and The Princess and the Pea (horrible).

I didn’t want to keep any of them but didn’t feel comfortable passing them on to other people to read either ������������‍♀️


Given plenty of other people might enjoy them (we often have people who love or hate a book in book group) give it to an op shop. Good for the environment, good for the charity, good for the person who gets a cheap book.


ETA: Unless it's one of Trump's, then feel free to dispose of as you wish.:)

Edited by born.a.girl, 23 November 2019 - 11:44 AM.


#78 hills mum bec

Posted 23 November 2019 - 11:51 AM

It’s been a while since I read The Slap but I don’t hate it.  I didn’t like any of the characters but still found the storyline engaging.  I felt exactly the same about the author’s other book, Barracuda.

#79 Jane Jinglebells

Posted 23 November 2019 - 12:08 PM

 Crombek, on 22 November 2019 - 12:10 PM, said:

Exactly. My fav genres are paranormal romance & urban fantasy. Hardly highbrow .

In the Reading Challenge thread I have admitted to reading two Five Nights At Freddy's spinoff novels, and I am halfway through the third :rofl:

I reckon that's even less highbrow than fanfic... stuff being highbrow, read for fun!

#80 born.a.girl

Posted 23 November 2019 - 12:09 PM

 Jane Jetson, on 23 November 2019 - 12:08 PM, said:

In the Reading Challenge thread I have admitted to reading two Five Nights At Freddy's spinoff novels, and I am halfway through the third :rofl:

I reckon that's even less highbrow than fanfic... stuff being highbrow, read for fun!


Everyone needs some bubblegum for the brain sometimes.  Mine's Australian Rules Football.

#81 Mose

Posted 23 November 2019 - 12:12 PM

Don't actually know what it is calked,, but currently engrossed in the sixth of the seven sisters series by Lucinda Riley (maybe the Sun sister).  I love these books so much.

Also recently introduced to the Shardlake series, which I love and have finished two.

Nothing about Boy Swallows Universe even tempts me to try, and I also haven't read The Slap. :-)

#82 Jane Jinglebells

Posted 23 November 2019 - 12:14 PM

 born.a.girl, on 23 November 2019 - 12:09 PM, said:

Everyone needs some bubblegum for the brain sometimes.  Mine's Australian Rules Football.

That too! I actually started watching it this year. Not the men's though. It is oddly relaxing.

The kids came and watched the final with me and the next week when they were playing in the back yard, they were playing "Erin Phillips being sent off with an injury" and high-fiving each other and generally being nice. It was pretty cool.

#83 born.a.girl

Posted 23 November 2019 - 12:19 PM

Anyone else read Michael Mohammed Ahmed's 'The Lebs'?



(Was a Miles Franklin finalist.)

#84 Hands Up

Posted 23 November 2019 - 01:00 PM

View PostRiotproof, on 22 November 2019 - 12:20 PM, said:

That one wasn’t the best. My favourite of hers is What Alice Forgot.
Yes, followed by Big Little Lies and The Husband’s Secret as a distant third. Nine Perfect Strangers was awful.

#85 JBH

Posted 23 November 2019 - 01:08 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 23 November 2019 - 12:19 PM, said:

Anyone else read Michael Mohammed Ahmed's 'The Lebs'?



(Was a Miles Franklin finalist.)

I haven’t, but I heard him interviewed, and it’s on my list. What did you think?

#86 born.a.girl

Posted 23 November 2019 - 02:56 PM

View PostJBH, on 23 November 2019 - 01:08 PM, said:

I haven’t, but I heard him interviewed, and it’s on my list. What did you think?


In a word?  Confronting.

Also very informative - it's not something I knew a lot about, especially living in Melbourne, where the focus has been on a very different group of immigrants.

#87 Lou-bags

Posted 23 November 2019 - 02:57 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 23 November 2019 - 11:36 AM, said:




Given plenty of other people might enjoy them (we often have people who love or hate a book in book group) give it to an op shop. Good for the environment, good for the charity, good for the person who gets a cheap book.


ETA: Unless it's one of Trump's, then feel free to dispose of as you wish.:)

We’ll have to agree to disagree for these particular ones. I don’t think it’s good for anyone to read Tizzy’s drivel and the version of Princess and the pea we had was the worst id seen- no little boy or girl should be exposed to that kind of message. Sure The Slap is not in that realm perhaps but I remember how reading his characterization of the slapped boy’s mother made me feel and that was just the start of it for me, so I’m fine with this particular wasteful act of mine. If it helps, it was a secondhand copy already.

You’d be appalled by Leigh Sales, lol, Crabb regularly rags her on their podcast about her ruthless binning of bad books

#88 born.a.girl

Posted 23 November 2019 - 03:01 PM

^^ Oh, no, I loved her book too.

#89 Lou-bags

Posted 23 November 2019 - 03:10 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 23 November 2019 - 03:01 PM, said:

^^ Oh, no, I loved her book too.

Brilliant book, wasn’t it? Would have been my best of 2019 hands down but I finished in 2018 I’m fairly certain.

Look, for all I know she doesn’t actually bin them and that’s just exaggerated for the purpose of ribbing a friend, let’s agree to believe she passes them on instead.

#90 born.a.girl

Posted 23 November 2019 - 03:23 PM

View PostLou-bags, on 23 November 2019 - 03:10 PM, said:

Brilliant book, wasn’t it? Would have been my best of 2019 hands down but I finished in 2018 I’m fairly certain.

Look, for all I know she doesn’t actually bin them and that’s just exaggerated for the purpose of ribbing a friend, let’s agree to believe she passes them on instead.

Best, I think. I don't want my opinion of her tarnished. :)


I really must start making a list of my reading. I'd actually forgotten about that and I read it this year.

My dilemma: my birthday is close to Christmas, and I was given two copies over that period.  Wish I'd remembered who gave me the second copy, I don't want to inadvertently give it back to them!

#91 born.a.girl

Posted 23 November 2019 - 03:28 PM

For those who enjoyed Burial Rites, I also enjoyed her other book 'The Good People', set in Ireland. Also a bit confronting.


One of the things I love about books like that is the insight into exactly how people lived, day to day, in those communities at that time.  I could never get my head around 'throwing turf on the fire' though, until I went there.

I'm a sucker for those historic village places.  Not in Australia, it seems corny when I know it so well but elsewhere, definitely.

#92 PaulaHall

Posted 26 November 2019 - 08:01 AM

View PostHands Up, on 23 November 2019 - 01:00 PM, said:

Yes, followed by Big Little Lies and The Husband’s Secret as a distant third. Nine Perfect Strangers was awful.

That's one of my favorites of hers as well.  I've read them all, but after Big Little Lies (which i really liked) I feel they have been missing something?

Same with Caroline Overington books.  I've read a few now, but the last  two she has released i felt let down.

#93 Lucrezia Bauble

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:06 AM

yeh i really liked Big Little Lies too, but not really any of her other books. i loved the tv series too...maybe even more than the book - but that was probably due to the real estate pOrn...


#94 FiveAus

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:12 AM

View PostPaulaHall, on 26 November 2019 - 08:01 AM, said:

That's one of my favorites of hers as well.  I've read them all, but after Big Little Lies (which i really liked) I feel they have been missing something?

Same with Caroline Overington books.  I've read a few now, but the last  two she has released i felt let down.

Yep, I loved Carolines early books but the last few seem really rushed and don't have that depth that the early ones had.

#95 me-n-b

Posted 03 December 2019 - 10:05 AM

From this thread I have read boy swallows universe (beautifully written, not my type of book so didn't really enjoy reading it but still thought it was good) and gravity is the thing (enjoyed this one more, made me cry, still probably wouldn't hand it to someone and say you have to read this but it was nice). I am back on here looking for my next read ������ have put where the crawdads sing on hold but it is a long wait lol.
Just finished going under By Sonia Henry about the working conditions of trainee doctors in Sydney, she wrote the recent open letter about suicides in the medical profession that went viral. I liked it except for her talking about how she was going to write a book in the book she wrote.
Can anyone recommend a more fantasy/science fiction/action/mystery book?

Edited by me-n-b, 03 December 2019 - 10:21 AM.


#96 jesse083

Posted 03 December 2019 - 01:13 PM

The day of the triffids,  john Wyndham

Scrublands, Chris hammer.  I preferred this to Jane Harper's the dry.

Becoming, Michelle obama

Loved Bruce pascos dark emu and looking forward to bill gammages' the biggest estate on earth.

Probably the best was a reread of pride and prejudice

#97 aquarium2

Posted 03 December 2019 - 02:23 PM

Am listening to "Your Own Kind of Girl" written and narrated by Clare Bowditch on Audible.

It's confronting and powerful, perhaps not book of the year but a must read.

#98 marieb

Posted 03 December 2019 - 03:17 PM

Just finished ‘Where the Crawdads Sing’ - loved it.

Those who liked Tara Westover’s ‘Educated’ will hopefully like ‘Maid’ by Stephanie Land. Another memoir I loved!

#99 Popper

Posted 03 December 2019 - 04:31 PM

Boy Swallows Universe ties with Girl, Woman, Other for me.

#100 Rosepickles

Posted 03 December 2019 - 05:59 PM

Love these threads, I'll have so many books ready for 2020!

Beartown by Fredrik Backman is probably my top read.

I also finally finished Robin Hobb's Assassin's Fate. I started the series when I was 16. I'm not sure if the book was good, but I loved it anyway because I feel like I've grown up with Fitz.

Other than that, I've been reading a lot of crime fiction which I find easy and great for before bed.




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