Jump to content

Article on Newstart


  • Please log in to reply
38 replies to this topic

#1 MincePieMasterchef

Posted 21 November 2019 - 09:53 AM

https://au.finance.y...-002955687.html

Do you think this article is accurate about the rents in Melbourne / Sydney and how little people have left over?

Truly terrible situation. How could anyone live on $6 a day :(

Edited by WannabeMasterchef, 21 November 2019 - 09:56 AM.


#2 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 21 November 2019 - 09:57 AM

It’s very accurate for many people.

People don’t have a choice but to make it work.

Newstart should be raised but this government does not give a sh*t about those people, only the big end of town!

#3 Ozquoll

Posted 21 November 2019 - 10:00 AM

Probably, although they were a bit light for detail on how they worked out the figures. Housing costs are insane In this country.

How good is that extra $3.30 a fortnight though? Those cossetted bastards on Newstart will be running wild with that sort of coin in their pocket!!

#4 MincePieMasterchef

Posted 21 November 2019 - 10:01 AM

The only thing I  can think of is maybe people live in substandard housing for lower rent? I know a few people that did that as students. Or perhaps they have lots of people sharing one house to bring the rent down

#5 Freddie'sMum

Posted 21 November 2019 - 10:01 AM

Yes.  Very accurate.

You know when those bleeding-heart-lefties like the Australian Business Council ask the govt to increase Newstart because it will help the economy.

This govt is rotten to the core.

#6 Ozquoll

Posted 21 November 2019 - 10:07 AM

 Freddie, on 21 November 2019 - 10:01 AM, said:

Yes.  Very accurate.

You know when those bleeding-heart-lefties like the Australian Business Council ask the govt to increase Newstart because it will help the economy.

This govt is rotten to the core.
Yes, the Libs are so ideologically committed to bashing dole-bludgers that they won't take the step of increasing Newstart, which, as you say, will immediately flow back into the economy as increased spending. Unlike *cough* tax cuts to rich people, who are just as likely to bung the extra dosh on the mortgage or leave it in a savings account.

#7 BahumChchgirlbug

Posted 21 November 2019 - 10:10 AM

And people continually vote them in.

I can't get my head around why..

#8 IamtheMumma

Posted 21 November 2019 - 10:14 AM

Very accurate. It might even be kind because rentals near me are more than what I get with PPS a fortnight. Even NRAS places would leave me with very little left over. Not that I'd be able to get a place on the PPS. If you're not working, you're stuffed.

#9 MincePieMasterchef

Posted 21 November 2019 - 10:18 AM

How do they expect people to 'get a job' when they wont be able to afford to have a phone on, or bus tickets to get to interviews, or decent clothes for a job interview :no2:

#10 Hollycoddle

Posted 21 November 2019 - 10:21 AM

I'd believe it. Here in Canberra you can be paying over $200 a week just for a room in a share house.

#11 Yippee-Ki-YayMF

Posted 21 November 2019 - 10:38 AM

I havent been on newstart in my life, but I have been on a carers pension for about 14 years (I work .5 EFT now but still receive about half my carers pension after reporting as the pay isnt very high). Living in a decent home in a decent neighbourhood is impossible, even on a Carer pension which is a fair bit higher that Newstart. Govt housing is inaccessible with waiting lists for emergency housing being five years long. Having to find somewhere to live if you are renting and on a pension is soul destroying. I feel dread every time I hear from the property manager in case its news that the owner is selling or moving back in. Its a pretty awful way to live.

#12 Lunafreya

Posted 21 November 2019 - 10:54 AM

 WannabeMasterchef, on 21 November 2019 - 10:18 AM, said:

How do they expect people to 'get a job' when they wont be able to afford to have a phone on, or bus tickets to get to interviews, or decent clothes for a job interview :no2:
That assumes you even live in an area with good public transport.  In regional areas you would need to drive.

#13 kadoodle

Posted 21 November 2019 - 11:11 AM

Newstart pays the same as it did back when I was on it as a uni student back in the late 90s. Rent was $80 a week, bread was 60c, milk was 80c, petrol was 65c/l, and it was still tight. I have no idea how people eat and put a roof over their head on Newstart these days; even the eating weetbix for every meal of my student days would be out of reach.

#14 IamzFeralz

Posted 21 November 2019 - 11:36 AM

 ~J_F~, on 21 November 2019 - 09:57 AM, said:

It’s very accurate for many people.

People don’t have a choice but to make it work.

Newstart should be raised but this government does not give a sh*t about those people, only the big end of town!

Because they are obsessed with being in surplus and cutting tax rates for the corporate sector and the wealthy.  It’s effectively a transfer of wealth from the poor. This is justified by making out that tis section of the community could get a job if they put their minds to it.  Even very disabled people can get jobs apparently.  They just need to belieeeve.

#15 marple

Posted 21 November 2019 - 11:51 AM

yes they could be rich too if they just tried harder. bloody leaners :sick:

#16 Lunafreya

Posted 21 November 2019 - 11:54 AM

I really hate the mentality that the unemployed "just aren't trying" to get jobs,

#17 katpaws

Posted 21 November 2019 - 12:07 PM

I have been trying to help a friend find a place (rental) in Melbourne. Share housing starts at around $200. One bedroom places really start at $230 for something adequate. Places for $210 are the lowest you can go, and often the cheaper places are full of mould, faulty wiring, are extremely small, dirty, do not follow building regulations, don't have a back door, have broken things in them, haven't been updated since 1975, etc. And we are looking at cheap areas.

#18 Prancer is coming

Posted 21 November 2019 - 12:43 PM

I totally think it is true.  I also think single people are pretty much unable to afford to live on their own, so stuck in share house types of arrangements or couch surfing.  You just can not afford rent and bills all on your own, unless you find super cheap rent.  I think it is impossible to afford a car too.

#19 Navy Blue

Posted 21 November 2019 - 02:55 PM

View PostIamtheMumma, on 21 November 2019 - 10:14 AM, said:

Very accurate. It might even be kind because rentals near me are more than what I get with PPS a fortnight. Even NRAS places would leave me with very little left over. Not that I'd be able to get a place on the PPS. If you're not working, you're stuffed.

OT, but I was reading the other day about a law that's been upheld in Seattle called 'first come first served'.

It's meant to take away bias and discrimination in the rental process, so basically the first suitable applicant gets the lease.

Great initiative!



#20 HolierThanCow

Posted 21 November 2019 - 03:02 PM

I am still married and living with my husband because of rental prices and the difficulty of finding somewhere with children (for either of us). It was just the end of the road about 18 months ago and unfortunately, financially, we have to keep living together. It's complicated enough with our being nice to each other and still friends. It must be a hellish nightmare for people stuck in abusive situations. Rent assistance has to be increased to reflect rental prices - the cap is far too low.

#21 melanieb530

Posted 21 November 2019 - 03:48 PM

So many people in difficult situations. I was looking at the school supplies list thread and at my sister in laws school they only charge around $8 to $40 per year per child for everything. She said there’s no point in the school adding anything more because so many families simply really genuinely can’t afford to pay.

#22 blimkybill

Posted 21 November 2019 - 04:39 PM

I agree that this is how much rents are in 2 BR units in inner suburbs.  But I think most people on Newstart find a way ro pay less rent than that through renting in properties with more than 2 people, renting crappier than average properties,  and renting further out. Or being in public housing. A bedroom in a house with 3, 4 or 5 sharers is cheaper. I don't think it's realistic to live on $10 to $20 a day after rent so people will seek cheaper rent.

Canberra share house room prices are often around $200 average. But a lot of students I know rent in groups of 3 to 6 and pay less each. Two of my DDs are in 3 share housing in crappy houses and pay $150 and $140 each.

#23 Lucrezia Bauble

Posted 21 November 2019 - 04:59 PM

View PostChchgirl, on 21 November 2019 - 10:10 AM, said:

And people continually vote them in.

I can't get my head around why..

agree. i can not fathom it. echoing a PP here...Shorten used the phrase “the big end of town” and got wiped out in the polls because of it. possibly by some people who -

- are on newstart  or have been in the past: and
- will never have franking credits

goes to show....people vote with their “identity” - with who they want to be, who they aspire to be, rather than who they are (including their particular financial circumstances).

if you want a fairer distribution of wealth Stop Voting For The LNP. (ETA or fringe parties who side with them).

Edited by Lucrezia Borgia, 21 November 2019 - 05:01 PM.


#24 123ChristmasTree

Posted 21 November 2019 - 05:07 PM

I think part of the problem is too that if you are working and tied into a lease then it ends up being more expensive to break the lease and move somewhere cheaper.

#25 Prancer is coming

Posted 21 November 2019 - 05:11 PM

View Postblimkybill, on 21 November 2019 - 04:39 PM, said:

I agree that this is how much rents are in 2 BR units in inner suburbs.  But I think most people on Newstart find a way ro pay less rent than that through renting in properties with more than 2 people, renting crappier than average properties,  and renting further out. Or being in public housing. A bedroom in a house with 3, 4 or 5 sharers is cheaper. I don't think it's realistic to live on $10 to $20 a day after rent so people will seek cheaper rent.

But they only find a way because they have to.  It is one thing to be in a share house when you move out of home, but most people don’t want that when they are 40.  There are massive waiting lists for public housing, even for those on the highest priority.  And little turnover.  Even if you can live on $20 a day, you still cannot rent the house as generally you need a bond loan.  The people doing the bond loans generally will not approve you if you are paying more than 30-40% of your payment on rent, as they deem you cannot afford the rent.  Many don’t want to be in a share house, and often those with a history of sexual abuse or mental illness are reluctant to live with a bunch of people they do not know in a share house.  There are very few decent options, so not like they are choosing cheaper places, it is the only thing they can do.

Edited by Prancer is coming, 21 November 2019 - 08:48 PM.





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.