Jump to content

Manual or Automatic Licence?


  • Please log in to reply
80 replies to this topic

#26 Bono25

Posted 26 November 2019 - 05:26 AM

I miss my manual car. My left foot still taps the clutch all the time lol
My oldest is only 5, I hope manuals are still around then, he will learn on one of those. My dad used to let us change gears for him growing up. It was so much fun!

#27 gracie1978

Posted 26 November 2019 - 05:26 AM

I'm really glad I can drive a manual car.

I've had two situations where I've had to drive someone to hospital and both times the only car available was manual.

Also it's kind of fun :)

#28 Lesley225

Posted 26 November 2019 - 06:21 AM

I think autos are confusing - only driven one once and couldn't figure out how to start it and with all those gears what are they for.  

I would not at all feel comfortable having to drive an auto.  

Though I admit when I last bought a new car I struggled to find a manual.

#29 qak

Posted 26 November 2019 - 06:25 AM

It would be interesting to know what cars are available in manuals these days - even though we wanted an auto, I certainly had the impression that manuals are rare these days.

#30 qak

Posted 26 November 2019 - 06:30 AM

Here you go - last year, less than 10% of new car sales were manuals:

https://www.drive.co...smission-118494

#31 born.a.girl

Posted 26 November 2019 - 06:33 AM

View Postqak, on 26 November 2019 - 06:25 AM, said:

It would be interesting to know what cars are available in manuals these days - even though we wanted an auto, I certainly had the impression that manuals are rare these days.


Many commercial vehicles are manual.  Our daughter's work has three vans, two auto and one manual. That's why she's going to get back to a manual. She did her first 40 hours in one (which we'd deliberately bought for her to learn in a manual) before she ended up on crutches.  If it's for an occasional trip for work though, it will be an advantage for her to be able to drive the manual.

#32 Romeo Void

Posted 26 November 2019 - 06:49 AM

I paid for lessons for my niece on the proviso she *had* to learn to drive a manual.  She complained and sooked but did it.  A couple of years later she phoned me, they'd been at a party and the designated driver had gotten himself written off. She was sober and the only one there who knew how to drive a manual.  She phoned me the next morning and thanked me.

#33 StoneFoxArrow

Posted 26 November 2019 - 06:52 AM

I learnt to drive manual and every car I've owned has been manual. I definitely prefer to drive them over autos. My DD will definitely be learning to drive manual because as per PPs, I just think it's a skill worth having.

I'm in my 30's and have driven many different cars for work, taken advanced driver training and 4wd training for work, had to drive other people's cars when they couldn't - many of these cars have been manuals and it's been useful to be able to drive them.

#34 Pearson

Posted 26 November 2019 - 07:07 AM

My parents made me do auto only 26 years ago. It wasnt until 10 years later I got my manual licence, I am a more attentive dricer in a manual.
With the 100 hours of driving required, I think it is good to get both under your belt if you can. We bought our DS a cheap manual car and he can drive both now.

#35 Hypnic Jerk

Posted 26 November 2019 - 07:19 AM

I'd normally say 'manual all the way' but given your circumstances I'd just stick to auto.

I miss my manual car

#36 Lifesgood

Posted 26 November 2019 - 07:28 AM

Sadly I think the days of manual cars are coming to an end. EVs will change the playing field completely - the absence of an internal combustion engine will mean there is no such thing as 'manual'.

Given you only have automatic cars I would just go with that.

I say this with a heavy heart as I love driving manual cars.

#37 dadwasathome

Posted 26 November 2019 - 07:31 AM

I got my licence on an auto in 1982, even though I had done some learning on a manual.

Until my current car, I have only owned manual.

Apart from the fact that manuals are heading the way of the dodo, auto is just far easier for learning.

I've taken DS16 out twice in our auto and I'm glad we're not working through manual issues with the process too. We have been discussing it however, as there are gearboxes (DSG/DCT) that do need some understanding of a manual if fewer of the actual skills.

#38 liveworkplay

Posted 26 November 2019 - 08:48 AM

I didn't realise getting just an automatic license was even an option.Scary if it is.

#39 liveworkplay

Posted 26 November 2019 - 08:50 AM

View Postqak, on 26 November 2019 - 06:25 AM, said:

It would be interesting to know what cars are available in manuals these days - even though we wanted an auto, I certainly had the impression that manuals are rare these days.
It is easy enough to buy a manual these days. If I was buying a zippy round town car I would go automatic, any type of distance driving/ towing...manual all the way.

We have one of each

#40 dadwasathome

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:07 AM

View Postliveworkplay, on 26 November 2019 - 08:48 AM, said:

I didn't realise getting just an automatic license was even an option.Scary if it is.

In NSW at least it has been an option for almost 4 decades, for  initial P-plate drivers at least.

As for manual cars, they are becoming rarer and rarer new. Even if they are in price lists, they are often not in stock. Many of the models in price lists showing a manual option are commercial vehicles.

Edited by dadwasathome, 26 November 2019 - 09:18 AM.


#41 grumpybum1

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:15 AM

DD did her test and lessons in an auto.

She bought her own car and its a manual so her Dad just taught her how to use the clutch/gears. Wasn't hard because she knew all the road rules/ how to drive etc. When looking for a car for her, she wanted a 4WD and many of those in her price range were manuals.

In SA there is no restriction - you can sit the test in an auto and if you pass you can drive auto or manual. I don't know why anyone would do it in a manual here really unless that was the only car they had to learn on.

#42 BusbyWilkes

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:21 AM

View Postliveworkplay, on 26 November 2019 - 08:48 AM, said:

I didn't realise getting just an automatic license was even an option.Scary if it is.

Why scary? You still need to learn all the road rules, drive the required supervised hours (up to 200 in some states), and then pass the test. And most cars on the road are now automatic.

And I say this as a manual car driver.

#43 BusbyWilkes

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:24 AM

View Postgrumpybum1, on 26 November 2019 - 09:15 AM, said:

DD did her test and lessons in an auto.

She bought her own car and its a manual so her Dad just taught her how to use the clutch/gears. Wasn't hard because she knew all the road rules/ how to drive etc. When looking for a car for her, she wanted a 4WD and many of those in her price range were manuals.

In SA there is no restriction - you can sit the test in an auto and if you pass you can drive auto or manual. I don't know why anyone would do it in a manual here really unless that was the only car they had to learn on.

Now that sounds a bit unsafe! Not your DD, but the rules. Here, if you get a manual licence, you can drive either. If you get an auto licence initially, you need to retest for a manual.

#44 marple

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:25 AM

View Postdadwasathome, on 26 November 2019 - 09:07 AM, said:

In NSW at least it has been an option for almost 4 decades, for  initial P-plate drivers at least.

As for manual cars, they are becoming rarer and rarer new. Even if they are in price lists, they are often not in stock. Many of the models in price lists showing a manual option are commercial vehicles.

that's only on your p's. after that you can drive whatever you like. 2 of my kids have had friends teach them after they were off their ps and  it is really pretty easy. you can pick it up in a couple of hours. i didnt realise other states had a lifetime auto only licence. thats weird

regarding international ime you just need a valid licence .

#45 seayork2002

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:28 AM

When I got mine back in the dark ages (late 90's) in NSW I had to wait a year to be able to drive a manual as my test was on an automatic,  I am can't remember if the other way around applied though.

Not sure now for NSW

(added the 'wait a year' rule I think it started when you got your P's? I can't remember but the year bit applied - it took me years to get my licence anyway)

Edited by seayork2002, 26 November 2019 - 09:34 AM.


#46 born.a.girl

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:32 AM

Our usual confusion over different states' rules.


In Vic you can drive manual after you're off your Ps.


Getting our daughter some driving lessons in a manual for Christmas, given our last manual (sob) went off on the back of a truck in a cloud of white smoke last year.

#47 jayskette

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:33 AM

it used to matter. now 97% of new cars bought are in auto. it would be handy to learn manual if you want to learn motorbike or truck later on, or in a trade.

#48 just roses

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:42 AM

View PostMooGuru, on 25 November 2019 - 07:33 PM, said:

I was always firm about the idea of learning to drive a manual. Having said that a family member is apparently the only driver at their school with a manual licence so maybe I overestimate how much of a *need* it is.
This.

We own two manual cars, and have only ever owned manual cars.

However, when we get a new car it will most likely be an auto. Manuals are just becoming so much rarer these days.

I would still prefer my kids to learn on a manual, as it teaches you more about how a car works. But if we only have autos in five years (which is highly likely) then I wouldn't be going to the effort of tracking down a manual for DS to learn in.

#49 123Tree

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:43 AM

In Victoria learners need 120-200 hours practice. Ideally I would start in an auto to help your child learn how to handle the vehicle and learn the ropes of road driving.   Then later do some driving lessons in a manual. It isn’t a difficult skill to learn and I would imagine only take three hours or so for an auto driver to get the knack.

My DH has two work utes in his company (One auto and one manual) and it is a pain when someone can’t drive manual and to be honest he doesn’t like hiring someone without the skill. At my work there are both manual and auto vans but then someone has to move their tools etc and it can be frustrating.

I don’t think it is just truck drivers than need manual I can think of lots of times I have found it handy.

The fact less of her age group are getting a manual license would mean I would be more keen.

#50 dadwasathome

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:44 AM

View Postseayork2002, on 26 November 2019 - 09:28 AM, said:

When I got mine back in the dark ages (late 90's) in NSW I had to wait a year to be able to drive a manual as my test was on an automatic,  I am can't remember if the other way around applied though.

Not sure now for NSW

(added the 'wait a year' rule I think it started when you got your P's? I can't remember but the year bit applied - it took me years to get my licence anyway)

That is the rule that still applies in NSW. You need to wait out your red Ps if you pass the test on an auto.

I agree a gift of some manual lessons sounds good if she wants to drive a manual.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.