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Teen period woes


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#26 Paddlepop

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:02 PM

Definitely get her checked out by a doctor with women's health experience. I went on the pill at about 15yo for period pain and acne. It made a huge difference for me.

Libra also make applicator tampons. I only learnt how to use tampons a few years ago and found the Libra applicators much easier than Tampax applicators.

Maybe try some different brands of pads to see if their absorbency suits her flow better.

#27 The new me

Posted 26 November 2019 - 09:22 PM

DD use some naprogesic, she thinks it works way better than neurofen.  I think there is a little bit of a placebo effect there as they are both non steroidal and have same mode of action.  But she gets benefit so that's what I buy.

Heavy periods are in the range of normal but perhaps keep an eye on her iron levels

Also agree with the period undies as a good back up

Good luck

#28 alyssatahli

Posted 26 November 2019 - 10:00 PM

My almost 14 year old DD recently had her first period, it lasted 16 days and was very heavy for most of that. I took her to the doctor on day 12, she was diagnosed with an iron deficiency and put on iron tablets. Waiting to see what this month brings. I will watch this thread with interest.

#29 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 26 November 2019 - 10:10 PM

View PostBabetty, on 26 November 2019 - 08:48 PM, said:

Just on this, I found the flow was more likely to go "over the edges" in a pad with wings than in one with no wings. The wings seemed to encourage wicking.
This is what I found as well, for myself. I use pads with no wings.

#30 GingerbreadWoman

Posted 27 November 2019 - 05:50 AM

It does sound like heavier bleeding than usual and if the pain is waking her that is definitely more severe than average.

For cramps a heat pack or wheat bag can help as well as painkillers. If her cycle is regular then taking ibuprofen the day before her period starts, or otherwise at the first sign of bleeding, then continuing to take one at eight hourly intervals for the first couple of days can really help. Both with cramps and reducing bleeding. I find painkillers much more effective for period pain if I take them before it gets bad.  
In terms of what to expect at a dr, hopefully if you see a good one, they should talk about options for managing the pain. They may suggest a blood test for iron levels or an ultrasound.
If she has only had her period for six months they may also suggest keeping a symptom diary for a couple of months and going back to review

https://jeanhailes.o...mptom_diary.pdf

This is a good website with a lot of women’s health information but does cover lots of things that are unlikely to be wrong at her age, so if she is very anxious perhaps best for you to read...

https://jeanhailes.o...lth-a-z/periods

Edited to add, I have never had a GP do any kind of physical exam when I’ve spoken to them about period pain, if that is something your daughter may be anxious about.

Edited by Toddlerandme, 27 November 2019 - 06:44 AM.


#31 amdirel

Posted 29 November 2019 - 11:13 AM

Thank you all so much for the advice. So much great info here that I had no idea about.

So I've offered to take her to the doctor and suggested she start keeping a diary of her symptoms. She said she wants to wait and see what her next period is like before deciding. She probably is embarrassed at the thought of talking to the doctor about it, so if she does complain to me next period, I'll have to try and encourage her I think.

I've found some tampax with applicators, and bought some lubricant which I've had a few people suggest. She hasn't tried it yet but it's there for when she's feeling brave! I'll also buy her some wingless pads when I'm at the shops next, and I'll ask her if she wants more modibodi's.
I also bought some naprogesic. I couldn't find ponstan.

So I feel like we're more prepared for her next period. She's still on the current period but it's settled now.

#32 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 29 November 2019 - 11:47 AM

They are expensive but Thinx due super undies which hold 4 tampons worth. Worked well for me when I had been flooding the 2 x tampon worth ones. I also backed up with the shorties ones over it too.

I am using Thix so I know myself how well they work in preparation for DD.



#33 Babetty

Posted 29 November 2019 - 11:50 AM

View Postamdirel, on 29 November 2019 - 11:13 AM, said:

I also bought some naprogesic. I couldn't find ponstan.


Ponstan you need to ask the pharmacist (but you don't need a script), rather than just on the shelf like naprogesic. Either of them work best if she takes it at the start of her period, or before if it's PMS pain, rather than waiting until the pain really takes hold.

#34 Romeo Void

Posted 29 November 2019 - 04:44 PM

After a recent talk I heard by a female Ob/Gyn, I'd be reluctant to rush to a GP and I'd definitely think loooong and hard about putting my child on the pill without taking them to a specialist who deals with this sort of thing.  Especially after the recent evidence of pill usage being linked to depression.  She said periods can take a very long time to settle into a pattern.

#35 *Ker*

Posted 29 November 2019 - 06:11 PM

DD first got her period at 9 and hers are very heavy and painful. I also had really heavy, painful periods that my mum wasn't helpful with and it turns out I had endometriosis, so I eventually got a Mirena.

I took DD to a paediatric gynae and she was really good. She ordered a blood test to check for Von Willebrands, and gave her the mini pill and some tablets for pain - tranexamic acid.

They're still painful and heavy but she's too young for the pill. She has another appointment to check this medication in 3 weeks.

#36 bubskitkat

Posted 29 November 2019 - 06:41 PM

Depending on your doctor, she may feel more comfortable talking to a female doctor rather than a male doctor.

I’m not sure where you are located but there are excellent female gynaecologists in Melbourne at the mercy hospital for women.

You could get a referral to a public gynaecologist and tell her that she can see how things go during the waiting time and if it’s not improved then go to the appointment.
This would put a time frame on it.

If you have private health insurance I am sure there is excellent female doctors whom could provide her with assistance.

As others have said there maybe underlying causes for this and there is no reason for her to suffer when there is ways that can help her.



#37 Ivy Ivy

Posted 29 November 2019 - 07:23 PM

Females in jobs that don't allow for toilet breaks wear tampons and a pad simultaneously.
Maternity all nighters are very absorbent, long and wide.  I'm now addicted to them overnight, even though I'm not postnatal.

#38 Caitlin Happymeal

Posted 29 November 2019 - 07:33 PM

Poor love. I only had heavy periods in adulthood - thankfully puberty was manageable. I ended up with adenomyosis which isn't likely to be her problem at her age but the blood loss meant my iron was in my boots. I felt like absolute rubbish, as well as flooding on one of my final pracs for nursing.

It's horrible. I agree with others that thinx/modibodi are really great. If she's not quite ready to seek medical help, just having the tampons and pain relief on hand and supporting her is about all you can do. If she does want to get some medical help, I'd also suggest a referral to a gynea instead of a GP - my GP is FAB but she knew that I would get better help from a gynea so referred me on. I'm so grateful she did.

It's no fun. Puberty is a suckful time.

#39 400

Posted 29 November 2019 - 09:59 PM

View PostIvy Ivy, on 29 November 2019 - 07:23 PM, said:

Females in jobs that don't allow for toilet breaks wear tampons and a pad simultaneously.
Maternity all nighters are very absorbent, long and wide.  I'm now addicted to them overnight, even though I'm not postnatal.

Jobs that don’t allow for toilet breaks?? Surely toilet breaks are like, a human right?

#40 JJ

Posted 29 November 2019 - 10:00 PM

View PostBabetty, on 29 November 2019 - 11:50 AM, said:

Ponstan you need to ask the pharmacist (but you don't need a script), rather than just on the shelf like naprogesic. Either of them work best if she takes it at the start of her period, or before if it's PMS pain, rather than waiting until the pain really takes hold.

I tried to buy some for DD at our local pharmacy last week. According to them, it has now been made prescription only, which is a bit of a bummer.

#41 me-n-b

Posted 29 November 2019 - 10:35 PM

I have always had heavy flooding painful periods, still do. Thought it was just in the range of normal. I remember when naprogesic first became available, made such a difference. Had never heard of ponstan!
One thing I did previously find helpful was taking evening primrose oil. I found I needed to take daily and for a month or two before it took full effect but then my periods were much lighter. Don't take anymore because I'm not brilliant at remembering to to take pills but it did work for me.
Interesting about depression and the pill pp, I avoid the pill because this is what happens to me, that and breakthrough bleeding

#42 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 30 November 2019 - 05:16 AM

Poor thing. I remember the horror of it all. As well as what PPs have suggested, I would also try taking lots of vitamin B. The best are soluble ones that you just keep in your mouth until they dissolve. Lo vitamin B makes everything period related much worse.

#43 .Jerry.

Posted 30 November 2019 - 05:40 AM

Tranexamic acid is prescribed to lessen blood loss.  Apparently it is pretty effective.

​I agree that periods can take time to settle.  DD's gynaecologist though said it can take several years to settle!  Poor DD had such huge blood loss and long periods that I wasn't about to wait and see. :(    And seeing a gynaecologist is definitely worth it as very heavy periods are linked to a number of conditions that can be investigated at some stage.
We will go back to Gynaecologist once DD is 14 for a bit more thorough investigation.  In the meantime the pill is worth it to give her back normality.

#44 WaitForMe

Posted 30 November 2019 - 05:55 AM

View Postamdirel, on 26 November 2019 - 07:51 PM, said:

Thanks for the great advice so far! Very helpful. I'll get her to keep a diary/app, that's a great idea.

She does have a pair of modibodi briefs and shorts, which she wears sometimes, but she's worried they may not necessarily help as she may wick through the edging, as she said her flow tends to go the full width of the pad straight away, rather than go the length of the pad, if that makes sense.
Plus if she wore a pad plus period undies, would I need to buy her pads with no wings?

She could try normal undies with a pad with wings, then period undies over the top. That way the period undies are covering the whole pad.

#45 amdirel

Posted 30 November 2019 - 02:57 PM

Definitely I won't be allowing the GP to fob us off, or jump straight to the pill. I'm more than happy to go to a specialist if need be.

View PostWaitForMe, on 30 November 2019 - 05:55 AM, said:



She could try normal undies with a pad with wings, then period undies over the top. That way the period undies are covering the whole pad.

Yes she does this some days, makes her feel pretty secure. She has asked me to buy more modibodi's, so they must be working so far.

#46 seayork2002

Posted 30 November 2019 - 03:20 PM

When I was older my flat mate mentioned incontinence and maternity pads

They worked well also for when I was heavy

#47 purplekitty

Posted 30 November 2019 - 03:51 PM

View PostJJ, on 29 November 2019 - 10:00 PM, said:

I tried to buy some for DD at our local pharmacy last week. According to them, it has now been made prescription only, which is a bit of a bummer.
20's are sill available without prescription.

50's are not.

#48 foxbread

Posted 30 November 2019 - 04:23 PM

My sister was always quick to bruise heavily, prone to long nosebleeds, etc, and when her period started, it was unusually heavy too. She has some genetic quirk that means her blood clots more slowly than average, and that was all related (tranexamic acid was useful as PP says). Perhaps something else to consider.

#49 littlepickle

Posted 30 November 2019 - 04:55 PM

My DD (16) starts ponstan and panadol as soon as her period starts and for the first 2 days. Maternity pads for overnight with black period pants - I do have medium size square fabric absorbent pads that can also be put on the bed for leakage (I actually have them in case of vomiting).

As a teenager my first 4-6 periods were heavy and terribly crampy. After this they settled down into an infrequent event and light. I was also a ballet dancer and moved to navy blue leotards and tampons at around the 6 week mark.

GP as a first stop (with a diary of st least one cycle) with the plan to request a Gynaecologist

Good luck

#50 PrincessPeach

Posted 30 November 2019 - 05:14 PM

View Post400, on 29 November 2019 - 09:59 PM, said:



Jobs that don’t allow for toilet breaks?? Surely toilet breaks are like, a human right?

Add this to the 101 reasons teachers are an underpaid profession.




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