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#26 *Spikey*

Posted 02 December 2019 - 10:15 PM

And the brother mentioned that it was a real wake up call for them, and they got the child appropriate medical treatment...

Presumably they are going to do something to make sure that the child is not around the dog, or is safe when the dog is around.

Rather than insisting they do something, you could ask them how they are going to manage it?

Because it's not your dog, and it's not your baby.

So you don't need to do anything, other than offer sympathy to all of those who were hurt in the incident (aka, not yourself).

Not that it had a chance to happen with mine (child strictly separated from all dogs, no matter how friendly/gentle each were), but that's pretty much the standard response for a dog who is eating and is correcting 'the pup'. The child had to be awfully close to be bitten on the face, the parents should have responded by redirection long before. It isn't the dog's fault, it is the human's fault, the dog should not be PTS or anything else. They should make sure that dog has a safe spot to eat in future, away from child.

#27 #notallcats

Posted 02 December 2019 - 10:15 PM

omg people, it wasn't a "scare"

dog atracks my nephew nearly taking out his eye

Yep he went to hospital had to have day surgery with stitches,

#28 #notallcats

Posted 02 December 2019 - 10:17 PM

Ok delusional dog people, keep doing you.

#29 IamtheMumma

Posted 02 December 2019 - 10:20 PM

Chances are there will be an at-risk report going in from the hospital to follow up with the family.

I don't know if I'd euthanise the dog but it wouldn't be an inside dog while the baby is awake (which can cause its own problems).

#30 #notallcats

Posted 02 December 2019 - 10:23 PM

 *Spikey*, on 02 December 2019 - 10:15 PM, said:

but that's pretty much the standard response for a dog who is eating and is correcting 'the pup'.

Perhaps I'm misunderstanding, it's a standard response to nearly take an eye out?  Requiring stitches?

Not a dog person but have had dogs in the family and never seen that before.

#31 Cheesy Sanga

Posted 02 December 2019 - 10:30 PM

Report it to the council and let them deal with it?

#32 McG2013

Posted 02 December 2019 - 11:34 PM

 #notallcats, on 02 December 2019 - 10:23 PM, said:



Perhaps I'm misunderstanding, it's a standard response to nearly take an eye out?  Requiring stitches?

Not a dog person but have had dogs in the family and never seen that before.

It's standard response for dogs to younger dogs. Your brother should've kept the baby away from the dogs food. If they've had the dog for 6yrs with no prior issues, it's likely they got lax with supervision between kids and dog.

It's a bit rough to put a dog down due to parent/adult error.

#33 steppy

Posted 02 December 2019 - 11:45 PM

If the dog isn't biting at other times, I'd feed the dog behind a fence of some kind and not have it put down unless it showed other signs of aggression. Maybe from now on it can eat outside or in a room with a closed door.

#34 MissMilla

Posted 03 December 2019 - 05:30 AM

My DS got bit in the face by our small dog when he was 2.
Wasnt defending food or anything. DS tripped and fell on top of him and the dog snapped at him because he was scared and hurt.
It would have never occurred to me to get rid of the dog or even euthanize him!

I think it really depends on how they handle the situations and what changes they are making to prevent further incidents.
If they take the necessary steps and take the incident seriously, i dont think you should get involved.

Reporting wont do anything i think. When DS got bit we took him to the hospital for stitches and the dr told us he will have to report it. We got a phone call asking if we want steps to be taken against the dog owner. I told them i was the dog owner... And they just went "oh okay."

#35 Noodlez

Posted 03 December 2019 - 05:49 AM

 #notallcats, on 02 December 2019 - 10:15 PM, said:

omg people, it wasn't a "scare"

dog atracks my nephew nearly taking out his eye

Yep he went to hospital had to have day surgery with stitches,

You are not OP? Was your nephew attacked too? I think you need help as you clearly have a thing about dogs.

It was the parents lack of supervision which is at fault not the dog.

Edited by Noodlez, 03 December 2019 - 05:53 AM.


#36 Sancti-claws

Posted 03 December 2019 - 05:52 AM

How very scary for your brother's family.  Everyone's nerves will be on edge.

If the dog had stalked the baby and attacked, fair call.

However, in this instance I don't think that the dog should be PTS.  The child should not be anywhere near the dog's food zone.  The child and dog's interactions should be very firmly monitored.  Should there be continuing behaviour, the dog should possibly be rehomed.

When my older daughter was a baby, her aunt (and baby cousin's mother) had a dog that was scary AF - and we followed the above rules, the kids knew that Pirat was not to be approached as a plaything and he was a fantastic guard dog for them - never a playmate - for the next 10 years.

#37 ilovethebeach

Posted 03 December 2019 - 05:55 AM

.

Edited by ilovethebeach, 03 December 2019 - 07:36 PM.


#38 *Spikey*

Posted 03 December 2019 - 06:22 AM

 #notallcats, on 02 December 2019 - 10:23 PM, said:

Perhaps I'm misunderstanding, it's a standard response to nearly take an eye out?  Requiring stitches?

Not a dog person but have had dogs in the family and never seen that before.

Yes, you are misunderstanding.

Dogs will guard their food unless taught specifically not to - and not having competition, is not teaching non-guarding behaviours. And a dog will snap at the nearest bit of the intruder, which isn't a problem when it's another dog, but is a problem when the intruder is a baby who has just shoved its face into the dog bowl. Statistically, children under 8yo are most likely to be bitten on the face because of their size and activities.

And yes, it's obvious that you aren't a "dog person", and that your interactions are limited to "once saw a dog when I was a kid". Which might explain your scared and OTT response, but doesn't make you informed on dog behaviour.

I recommend Kidsafe's Kids N Dogs (or the other way around), for a good read on keeping small children safe around dogs. The OP doesn't need to insist that the dog remain outdoors during her visits - but she does need to ensure that her smallest child (a toddler) doesn't approach the dog. Dogs are not toys, no matter how cute and cuddly they look, and adults are often guilty of inadvertently encouraging children into dangerous situations by ooing and ahing over the child's interest in a dog.

Edited by *Spikey*, 03 December 2019 - 06:22 AM.


#39 Ivy Ivy

Posted 03 December 2019 - 06:41 AM

This is a child protection issue.  I would call FACS, the child protection hotline section, and be guided by them.  No way would I just let this be.  Such "let it be" attitudes harm children in vulnerable situations, and this needs investigation as to whether it is a vulnerable situation, by people with the power to investigate.
I'm always amazed at the media reports of neighbours in big child abuse cases who say "oh yes we knew the child was being harmed but it wasn't our place to interfere".

I thought any dog which had attacked a child had to be put down? Maybe I'm wrong.

#40 ilovethebeach

Posted 03 December 2019 - 06:45 AM

.

Edited by ilovethebeach, 03 December 2019 - 07:38 PM.


#41 **Xena**

Posted 03 December 2019 - 06:53 AM

 Ivy Ivy, on 03 December 2019 - 06:41 AM, said:

This is a child protection issue.  I would call FACS, the child protection hotline section, and be guided by them.  No way would I just let this be.  Such "let it be" attitudes harm children in vulnerable situations, and this needs investigation as to whether it is a vulnerable situation, by people with the power to investigate.
I'm always amazed at the media reports of neighbours in big child abuse cases who say "oh yes we knew the child was being harmed but it wasn't our place to interfere".

I thought any dog which had attacked a child had to be put down? Maybe I'm wrong.

You're wrong. Most dogs aren't required to be euthanized unless they continue to attack due to precautions not being taken/ineffective or a particularly vicious attack. Depending on the situation they are declared a dangerous dog and extra precautions are required to be taken.

I don't think you can compare a child being abused with this situation. A child abuser doesn't usually immediately turn up at hospital and let the medical staff know exactly how the child's injuries were sustained.

Edited by **Xena**, 03 December 2019 - 06:55 AM.


#42 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 03 December 2019 - 06:54 AM

 ilovethebeach, on 03 December 2019 - 05:55 AM, said:

Thanks everyone for your comments. And JF to answer your comments I raised my brother hence my  comments we have a complicated relationship. He asks for advice sometimes! and ignores it most of the time. I'm certainly not looking to insert myself into any 'drama' but you clearly are.

Say what? I never said anything about drama.

This is the kind of crap that I am done with, I asked a question then get ripped into because people put their spin on it.

Sorry for bothering to join in a what do you think thread...

#43 StoneFoxArrow

Posted 03 December 2019 - 07:02 AM

I agree that the dog shouldn't necessarily be put down when the humans are clearly at fault, and if they happen to recognise that, even better! But it is a pretty serious situation, I would understand if the parents felt like the dog couldn't be around young children and attempted to rehome it somewhere without young kids. The 6 years without an issue prior is worth considering too, imo.

 ~J_F~, on 03 December 2019 - 06:54 AM, said:


Say what? I never said anything about drama.

This is the kind of crap that I am done with, I asked a question then get ripped into because people put their spin on it.

Sorry for bothering to join in a what do you think thread...

J_F, you're completely right, people put their own spin on what you said. But that's normal too. I understood what you were saying, but did think that the OP might not take it as you had meant it.

There are some obvious sensitivities for certain posters, which is to be expected.

Edited by StoneFoxArrow, 03 December 2019 - 07:03 AM.


#44 blimkybill

Posted 03 December 2019 - 07:20 AM

 Ivy Ivy, on 03 December 2019 - 06:41 AM, said:

This is a child protection issue.  I would call FACS, the child protection hotline section, and be guided by them.  No way would I just let this be.  Such "let it be" attitudes harm children in vulnerable situations, and this needs investigation as to whether it is a vulnerable situation, by people with the power to investigate.
I'm always amazed at the media reports of neighbours in big child abuse cases who say "oh yes we knew the child was being harmed but it wasn't our place to interfere".

I thought any dog which had attacked a child had to be put down? Maybe I'm wrong.
Child protection will not be interested in this. They may make a phone call to the family; once they hear what is being done to prevent future events they will just leave it there.

#45 Oriental lily

Posted 03 December 2019 - 07:33 AM

I think your brother  is in the wrong for underestimating the dangers of his dog . Little fluffy dogs DO have teeth and will use them if threatened . If the dog has ‘snapped ’ Previously then I know exactly what type of dog this is .

It’s a dog bought as a cute little fluff ball of a puppy and never given the training and discipline and leadership it needed . Over indulged, treated like a baby they become little tyrants ruling the house .

Now a real human baby has come in to the family . The dog has been put down a peg in the ranking . ‘Furkid’ Is no longer the centre of attention .

Then this new little invader ( baby) even dares to come near food!!

Dog sets out to establish rank . Bite .

Poor baby is the victim of poor pet ownership .

These small fluffy toy breeds get away with so much more then their larger cousins . Because they are small and relatively harmless .

Harmless until your a small baby crawling at their same height .Going near their food .

Op this dog does not need to be destroyed . It needs to be treated like a dog . Your brother forgot that .

Now I doubt he will .

I think consideration for rehoming is a good idea . Small fluffys tend to be rehomed fairly easily . Even the indulged snappy ones .

But other than that I think your brother now knows the potential damage even small fluffy dogs can do . So should be more vigilant .

But bites by small toy breeds ARE treated differently .

Any dog person knows that .

#46 kadoodle

Posted 03 December 2019 - 08:20 AM

If the dog’s regularly snappy, then by all means insist on it being away from your kids when you visit. My dogs are generally well behaved, but they’re chained outside  or actively supervised when there’s small children visiting because you never know when kid or dog will have a brain fart.

#47 HolierThanCow

Posted 03 December 2019 - 08:46 AM

It sounds like this dog is incompatible with small children. Many dogs are uncomfortable around crawling babies and toddlers, and letting one near a dog's food bowl is idiotic. It needs to be kept in a separate part of the house or rehomed with a child-free family. I would not keep it in the house if it had bitten my child, but would not have it pts. It was a provoked attack. Having a dog with small children is very hard - if I had my time again, I wouldn't do it.

#48 gracie1978

Posted 03 December 2019 - 09:01 AM

I don't think the dog needs to be put down.  But rehoming could be a good option.  Really just because of the snapiness I would have already done this already.

At the same age I was attacked by a cat.  The next day it went to live with a family member.

Edited by gracie1978, 03 December 2019 - 09:39 AM.


#49 #notallcats

Posted 03 December 2019 - 09:38 AM

 *Spikey*, on 03 December 2019 - 06:22 AM, said:

Yes, you are misunderstanding.

Dogs will guard their food unless taught specifically not to - and not having competition, is not teaching non-guarding behaviours. And a dog will snap at the nearest bit of the intruder, which isn't a problem when it's another dog, but is a problem when the intruder is a baby who has just shoved its face into the dog bowl. Statistically, children under 8yo are most likely to be bitten on the face because of their size and activities.

And yes, it's obvious that you aren't a "dog person", and that your interactions are limited to "once saw a dog when I was a kid". Which might explain your scared and OTT response, but doesn't make you informed on dog behaviour.



I'm well aware dogs guard their food.  I'm well aware dogs will snap when around food.  I'm well aware of everything you mentioned actually, which is pretty amazing since I only saw a dog once when I was seven.  

I was not aware it's normal correcting behaviour to nearly take an eye.

#50 HolierThanCow

Posted 03 December 2019 - 09:42 AM

 #notallcats, on 03 December 2019 - 09:38 AM, said:

I was not aware it's normal correcting behaviour to nearly take an eye.

I doubt very much that the dog was specifically going for the eye.




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