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#51 Hollycoddle

Posted 03 December 2019 - 09:49 AM

 ilovethebeach, on 02 December 2019 - 09:02 PM, said:

Yep he went to hospital had to have day surgery with stitches, lucky not to have interfered with the tear ducts or resulted in permanent eye damage. But on my suggestion he euthanize the dog his reply was well it was our fault he was just protecting his food. Who could you report too?

Child protection services in your state.  I don't see that it's as much an issue with the dog as it was doing what comes naturally but the supervision of the child is clearly lacking.

#52 #notallcats

Posted 03 December 2019 - 09:49 AM

 HolierThanCow, on 03 December 2019 - 09:42 AM, said:

I doubt very much that the dog was specifically going for the eye.

Probably not but it's says something about what sort of attack it was.  I've seen dogs get into tiffs about food, lots of growling, air snaps, some contact but it's all just a warning.  I've also seen dogs who go completely crazy over food, and those dogs shouldn't be around babies.

I'm not suggessting the dog needs to PTS, but there are a few responses that are completely dismissive of the OP's concerns.  Even changing the narrative (baby shoving his head in the food bowl vs what the OP actually said). The baby is going to be a 2 year old next, and 2 year old love being all over animals.  She is right to be concerned.

#53 Hollycoddle

Posted 03 December 2019 - 09:50 AM

 #notallcats, on 02 December 2019 - 10:17 PM, said:

Ok delusional dog people, keep doing you.

Any dog will do this.  Do you think no-one should ever be allowed to keep a dog as a pet ever?  Because that's what you're saying...

#54 HolierThanCow

Posted 03 December 2019 - 09:58 AM

 #notallcats, on 03 December 2019 - 09:49 AM, said:

I've also seen dogs who go completely crazy over food, and those dogs shouldn't be around babies.

The baby is going to be a 2 year old next, and 2 year old love being all over animals.  She is right to be concerned.

(my edit)

I agree.

#55 annodam

Posted 03 December 2019 - 10:15 AM

As a dog owner, I wouldn't be PTS the dog over this behaviour.
I would be closely monitoring all interactions with child/ren & dog though.  Plus, in future, the dog would be fed in a location inaccessible to children, say a locked laundry for instance.

I can approach my dog & take food right from his mouth but I
have been doing this since he was weeks old, so he knows I'm not a threat.
The kids however, are not to approach the dog when he's eating, they do feed him though.
Old Basenji is going on 14½yo now, is partly blind & deaf, he needs to be left in peace to eat his meal in his senior years.

When I was around 6yo, I was bitten on the arm by a family members dog, it was eating & I walked right by it.

Whenever you visit your brother next, just ask him to put the dog out, if he refuses, don't visit.
I have relatives who don't visit here anymore because visitors don't get to dictate what I do with my dog, but that's just me...



EFS:

Edited by annodam, 03 December 2019 - 10:17 AM.


#56 Noodlez

Posted 03 December 2019 - 11:00 AM

 #notallcats, on 03 December 2019 - 09:49 AM, said:



I've seen dogs get into tiffs about food, lots of growling, air snaps, some contact but it's all just a warning.  I've also seen dogs who go completely crazy over food, and those dogs shouldn't be around babies.


Did you not write in another post that you only saw a dog once when you were 7?

ETA

 #notallcats, on 03 December 2019 - 09:38 AM, said:



I'm well aware dogs guard their food.  I'm well aware dogs will snap when around food.  I'm well aware of everything you mentioned actually, which is pretty amazing since I only saw a dog once when I was seven.  

I was not aware it's normal correcting behaviour to nearly take an eye.

Edited by Noodlez, 03 December 2019 - 11:03 AM.


#57 VigilantePaladin

Posted 03 December 2019 - 11:03 AM

Sounds like a behaviour issue...and not with the dog. It's an owner issue.

Our dogs were trained to get off their food when told and we involved the kids in their training. No ifs or buts. Off food  meant off food  and no going back until told. ALL dogs should have that training.

#58 Clementinerose

Posted 03 December 2019 - 11:22 AM

I have a relative I don’t visit anymore because they refused to lock up a dog which had bitten my daughter on the face (unprovoked, not eating and a supervised 7 year old) Apparently the dog wouldn’t hurt a fly. The dog has since gone on to maul some large farm animals to death.
I didn’t ask for the dog to be euthanised as I understood the dog meant a lot to them, however I didn’t want it around my kids anymore. I think that was fair enough. My daughter has a scar on her face for life now.
So OP, it is absolutely reasonable to ask for the dog to not be around your kids and I really hope the parents make the right choice whatever that is for their little boy.

#59 **Xena**

Posted 03 December 2019 - 11:51 AM

 Clementinerose, on 03 December 2019 - 11:22 AM, said:

I have a relative I don’t visit anymore because they refused to lock up a dog which had bitten my daughter on the face (unprovoked, not eating and a supervised 7 year old) Apparently the dog wouldn’t hurt a fly. The dog has since gone on to maul some large farm animals to death.
I didn’t ask for the dog to be euthanised as I understood the dog meant a lot to them, however I didn’t want it around my kids anymore. I think that was fair enough. My daughter has a scar on her face for life now.
So OP, it is absolutely reasonable to ask for the dog to not be around your kids and I really hope the parents make the right choice whatever that is for their little boy.

I think it's completely reasonable for the OP to request the dog be put away when she's there with her children.
I think what most people are objecting to is that her first couple of responses said that she wanted the dog euthanised due to the provoked attack and implied that she wanted to report the dog because her brother said no to that. That was without her knowing what precautions he may be taking now and in the future.

She has every right to be concerned about her own child or nephew interacting with the dog. However there are other things to try before killing the dog, especially as this incident was very situational.

#60 born.a.girl

Posted 03 December 2019 - 11:51 AM

 Noodlez, on 03 December 2019 - 11:00 AM, said:

Did you not write in another post that you only saw a dog once when you were 7?

ETA

Not really, you need to go back to that poster's comment which got phrased by a respondent that way.  Irony font needed.

#61 justbreath

Posted 03 December 2019 - 11:56 AM

 blimkybill, on 02 December 2019 - 09:37 PM, said:

Another option is always fed the dog in a separate room, perhaps have a baby gate between the main house and the laundry, where the dog can get fed.

My dogs-are-my-life partner just said any dog would do this if a baby crawled towards its dinner while it was being fed.

Actually, no, not any dog would do this. Resource guarding is something that can (should) be trained out from a young age. Not all dogs would do this and if the dog is inclined to then the baby and dog should never ever be left together or food be near the baby.
Think about guide dogs etc, they are trained NOT to ever respond like this. Our dog is just a pet, not a service dog, but I am 100% confident she would not do this (and similar situations have arisen where the kids actually stole food from her mouth!!) Obviously we had very clear discussions with the kids about how this was not ok but the point is that if the dog resource guards and also hasn’t been trained to have a soft mouth then they need to be incredibly careful.

#62 Hollycoddle

Posted 03 December 2019 - 12:07 PM

 #notallcats, on 03 December 2019 - 09:49 AM, said:

Probably not but it's says something about what sort of attack it was.  I've seen dogs get into tiffs about food, lots of growling, air snaps, some contact but it's all just a warning.  I've also seen dogs who go completely crazy over food, and those dogs shouldn't be around babies.


It really doesn't take much to inflict an injury like this.  My son was nipped on the ear when he put his head close to one of my relative's dogs (a Staffie which are usually good-tempered but this one wasn't used to visitors).  I got it looked at by a doctor who said we were very lucky it hadn't been a centimetre or two lower as it could have nicked the jugular.  It can be as simple as nipping at the wrong location or angle in order to sustain a dangerous injury.  The thing is, if the child was kept away from the eating dog in the first place there wouldn't have been any reason for an injury to even happen.

ETA we still visit that person, I just drill it into my son not to put his face near the dog's face.

#63 Romeo Void

Posted 03 December 2019 - 12:51 PM

 Mollycoddle, on 03 December 2019 - 09:49 AM, said:

Child protection services in your state.  I don't see that it's as much an issue with the dog as it was doing what comes naturally but the supervision of the child is clearly lacking.
Just be prepared to lose your relationship with your brother....

#64 MrsLexiK

Posted 03 December 2019 - 01:18 PM

 #notallcats, on 02 December 2019 - 10:15 PM, said:

omg people, it wasn't a "scare"

dog atracks my nephew nearly taking out his eye

Yep he went to hospital had to have day surgery with stitches,
We had a similar thing happen except no food involved and no eye injury. I took my old boy to the vet the next day in tears thinking he would have to be put down. The vet almost laughed at me they said the most drastic thing we would likely try if x y and z didn’t help would be rehoming with adults/teens before pts. Once we got on top of his pain meds he never once even snapped at another human (let alone animal) for he next 4 years (passed away this year).

#65 No Drama Please

Posted 03 December 2019 - 01:35 PM

 Romeo Void, on 03 December 2019 - 12:51 PM, said:

Just be prepared to lose your relationship with your brother....
Better than a child ending up in hospital

#66 kitkatswing

Posted 03 December 2019 - 01:47 PM

 VigilantePaladin, on 03 December 2019 - 11:03 AM, said:

Sounds like a behaviour issue...and not with the dog. It's an owner issue.

Our dogs were trained to get off their food when told and we involved the kids in their training. No ifs or buts. Off food  meant off food  and no going back until told. ALL dogs should have that training.

Agree completely.

I have a 9 yr old Jack Russell, since he was with us we have taught him not to be food aggressive.

You could reach in and take food out of his mouth and he would just pout and look at you.

My 6 yr old has also been taught at a young age to leave him alone, if she gets too annoying, he grumbles and she walks away.   Although most days now he is bringing all his toys to her to play!

#67 Hollycoddle

Posted 03 December 2019 - 01:48 PM

 Romeo Void, on 03 December 2019 - 12:51 PM, said:

Just be prepared to lose your relationship with your brother....

It didn't have to be the OP who reported.  It could possibly have been the hospital?

#68 Ruf~Feral~es

Posted 03 December 2019 - 01:48 PM

 #notallcats, on 03 December 2019 - 09:38 AM, said:

I'm well aware dogs guard their food.  I'm well aware dogs will snap when around food.  I'm well aware of everything you mentioned actually, which is pretty amazing since I only saw a dog once when I was seven.  

I was not aware it's normal correcting behaviour to nearly take an eye.

 #notallcats, on 03 December 2019 - 09:49 AM, said:

  I've also seen dogs who go completely crazy over food, and those dogs shouldn't be around babies.

I'm not suggessting the dog needs to PTS, but there are a few responses that are completely dismissive of the OP's concerns.  

And there are also some responses that area completely OTT regarding dog behaviour.  There is a difference between "dog snapped at my nephew and caught him on the face" and "dog attacked my nephew".  Was it one snap that connected, or was the nephew mauled?  I dont think we know.

I have a scratch on my cheek that required stitches, and could have taken my eye had it been 1cm higher.  It was done by my cat - lashing out at my dog and I got in the way.

Did I think of having her put down?  She often scratched my kids too, when they were young.  A cat claw can do some damage......  

We also had big dogs (doberman, Wiemarana,) when our kids were small.  Gates all over the house separating them when unsupervised.  They were very gentle dogs, but I didn't leave them alone with babies/toddlers, not until the kids were probably over 6?  And always locked them outside when other people's kids came over, until much older.

Animals are like swimming pools.  Kids should NEVER be unsupervised around them.  Ever.

This was not the dogs fault.  Even if it can be a bit snappy.

#69 Romeo Void

Posted 03 December 2019 - 02:20 PM

 No Drama Please, on 03 December 2019 - 01:35 PM, said:

Better than a child ending up in hospital
The parents are detailing with it, they've said they're dealing with it.  The OP is obviously used to controlling things as she 'raised' him.  She needs to step back and let her brother handle his family. No need to get hysterical.

Edited by Romeo Void, 03 December 2019 - 02:21 PM.


#70 *Spikey*

Posted 03 December 2019 - 03:45 PM

 #notallcats, on 03 December 2019 - 09:49 AM, said:



Probably not but it's says something about what sort of attack it was.  I've seen dogs get into tiffs about food, lots of growling, air snaps, some contact but it's all just a warning.  I've also seen dogs who go completely crazy over food, and those dogs shouldn't be around babies.

I'm not suggessting the dog needs to PTS, but there are a few responses that are completely dismissive of the OP's concerns.  Even changing the narrative (baby shoving his head in the food bowl vs what the OP actually said). The baby is going to be a 2 year old next, and 2 year old love being all over animals.  She is right to be concerned.

Two year olds should NEVER love being all over animals. Adults who encourage that, praise it, smile at it, go all mooshy at the 'love' are promoting dog bites, and most likely to the face because kids are short, and their faces tend to be at dog face height. Last time I looked, faces had eyes, it's unlikely the dog went for the eyes, but they are on the face, so not unsurprisimgly, eyes are in the line of potential damage risk.

You all expect the dog to behave like a toy, and won't be responsible enough to manage your child's behaviour, then want to kill the poor bloody dog. You're nuts.

#71 lucky 2

Posted 03 December 2019 - 03:54 PM

If no actions taken by the parents after the injury then wouldn't that be child neglect or endangering?
Then it should be reported to DHS.
If they do something to prevent any further issues then nothing needs to go further. ?

I think there is a significant difference between being concerned and wanting to control.
The OP knows she can't control her brother, but she can plan for the future with a view to negating the risk that dog poses, at least in regards to her children.


#72 *Spikey*

Posted 03 December 2019 - 04:00 PM

Of course she can. That wasn't her question though, she wanted to do something about someone else's child's and dog, not her own child.

FWIW, not visiting while the dog is on the loose is perfectly fine, especially if she has a toddler who has been taught to "like" dogs rather than leave them alone. Much safer. I'd also make quite a few other training recommendations for the dog (and baby), but it isn't her dog, so there is limited point to doing that.



#73 Clementinerose

Posted 03 December 2019 - 05:57 PM

So many people saying stay out of it, not your business, your trying to control your brother, not your child etc
At what point do you step in as a concerned relative to help a vulnerable child. This child cannot speak for itself, nor defend itself. It requires the adults in its life to step up and protect it from harm

#74 **Xena**

Posted 03 December 2019 - 06:18 PM

 Clementinerose, on 03 December 2019 - 05:57 PM, said:

So many people saying stay out of it, not your business, your trying to control your brother, not your child etc
At what point do you step in as a concerned relative to help a vulnerable child. This child cannot speak for itself, nor defend itself. It requires the adults in its life to step up and protect it from harm

If nothing changes, if the child is deliberately put in harm's way or if the dog becomes an ongoing issue for the child's health and well bring. Not after one tragic accident resulting from a very particular situation.

I'm sure the brother feels guilty enough. I can't imagine how awful it would be trying to deal with both that guilt and a family who were trying to report you behind your back and telling you to euthanise your dog.

#75 Romeo Void

Posted 03 December 2019 - 06:23 PM

 Clementinerose, on 03 December 2019 - 05:57 PM, said:

So many people saying stay out of it, not your business, your trying to control your brother, not your child etc
At what point do you step in as a concerned relative to help a vulnerable child. This child cannot speak for itself, nor defend itself. It requires the adults in its life to step up and protect it from harm
Certainly not over one incident.  If people were jumping all over parents for making one mistake we'd all be locked up...

Edited by Romeo Void, 03 December 2019 - 06:24 PM.





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