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Do you get micromanaged at work?


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#1 anon039

Posted 06 December 2019 - 03:54 PM

I’m a registered nurse. This means that I’ve got a degree and can practice in that role and it’s expected that I know what I’m doing, especially after many years of working.
In the last few years I’ve noticed more and more a trend that I feel nurses as a whole are being micromanaged. I’m sure this happens across the board in many other professions.
Do you think this contributes to burnout and makes an employee feel undervalued and deameaned? I certainly do to the point of thinking about a complete career change.
Interested in what others think.


#2 Redhead43

Posted 06 December 2019 - 04:09 PM

I think I do a bit, especially by my manager who isn’t even a nurse so has no idea of clinical issues.
I just ”smile and wave” as it’s my registration at the end of the day, and I won’t do anything to jeopardise that.

However, I was a manager myself a few years ago and definitely didn’t micromanage the RNs. Maybe I should have as I wrongly assumed that some of them had at least basic skills and knowledge, which turned out not to be the case for a few staff.

It doesn’t make me want to change my career though, I think that you would get these people in all walks of life.

#3 VVV

Posted 06 December 2019 - 04:24 PM

Micromanaging is a form of bullying

#4 qak

Posted 06 December 2019 - 04:31 PM

Different industry, but I got micromanaged for a couple of weeks when my work was sold.  I turned around and said:
- I have been doing this work for over 20 years
- I don't need to be told step by step what to do
- I don't need reminding to follow up people
- and I'm not going to harrass a client by following them up every single day because they will get the sh*ts (unsaid: like I do!)

They guy wanted to control everybody; keep them down by not "letting" junior staff learn anything. I hate that kind of attitude, it stinks.

I had forgotten how demeaning it was until I wrote that all down. So glad I don't work there now!

#5 Melbs2010

Posted 06 December 2019 - 04:45 PM

It definitely contributes to work dissatisfaction.

I'm not micromanaged at present but was several years back.  I truly hated work during that period.  Prior to that I had quite a lot of independence and autonomy (which is something I value) in large part due to having a lot of experience in the role.  And because I have a brain and am capable of using it.

When micromanaged it felt like every single move I made was being monitored, I had to be constantly reporting back on what work I was doing.  Continual, time wasting meetings to provide updates.  At it's most ridiculous point I was told I had to follow a particular (completely arbitrary) procedure exactly as my nightmare manager requested even though it was less efficient and no one else in the tram was actually following it either.  They were just too reluctant to say so.  It had zero impact on the outcome, we were just not allowed to plan our time individually and in a way that suited our own efficiencies because our manager had to be in control of everything.

I agree it can be a form of bullying.  I found it insulting to my intelligence.  It felt like being continually treated like a moron who is incapable of managing their time and using their knowledge.

I'm not in nursing so can't speak for that aspect but I'm very glad my work environment is different now.

#6 UndergroundKelpie

Posted 06 December 2019 - 05:11 PM

An interstate manager keeps sending me micromanaging emails. I have started sending back polite but passive aggressive comments. Today's one was. "I'm sorry. I will try harder. Maybe I need more input. :)"

#7 littlepickle

Posted 06 December 2019 - 05:15 PM

Are you in a specialty field of nursing in an open plan environment? (ICU/CCU) I can imagine that there would be some nurse managers in those environments who would micromanage staff purely because of the ward set up and their personality. This would be awful and would really leave your confidence battered.
I have only worked in 26-30 bed wards where there is no way your manager would be able to micromanage you because there is too much going on behind closed doors. Sometimes you will work with an over eager ‘buddy’ during team nursing who likes to run the show. But the great think with shift work is that you might only work with them 1-2 shifts a fortnight.
If by micromanaging you mean the volume of paperwork (effectively tick boxes) rather than skilled documentation of clinical assessments then I totally agree.

#8 Thylacine

Posted 06 December 2019 - 05:30 PM

I'm not a nurse but my current boss is a micromanager . I really hate my job and am looking for a new one. Boss wants to be copied in on just about every email I send. And she doesn't trust me to manage my own time- One day I left a 40 min piece of work on my desk and she told me I should do it straight away. I asked what the consequences of leaving it till the next day were and she said that I never know what might happen tomorrow, I might get too busy

#9 Froyohoho

Posted 06 December 2019 - 05:36 PM

Yes, it isn't uncommon in education.

#10 seayork2002

Posted 06 December 2019 - 05:44 PM

In one previous job a bit, all the rest (different industries) no.

Although different work environments mainly retail and admin (current job)

#11 TwinMumNat

Posted 06 December 2019 - 05:52 PM

Yep in the current one, atrociously though. IME it depends on what senior managers are experiencing.

#12 lucky 2

Posted 06 December 2019 - 06:15 PM

I feel miserable, agitated and demoralized when I am micromanaged.
I am more autonomous atm and that's great but there is still a sense I'm not trusted to manage the unpredictable or sudden changes which is also frustrating.
I don't get to work to my full capacity, in a role I've had longer than any of co workers, and the manager has never worked in my role.
I think being part time doesn't work in my favour.
I stay because I love the clinical challenges, and I get paid!

#13 Evra

Posted 06 December 2019 - 06:20 PM

Just a reminder to post in this thread when you have a sec! It would be great if you could send me an email when done.

(Yes. I hate it. Totally different industry.)

#14 TwinMumNat

Posted 06 December 2019 - 06:20 PM

I think we need to develop a list of strategies to deal eith micromanaging

#15 night jasmine

Posted 06 December 2019 - 06:42 PM

The only strategy that worked for me was to find another job and leave.

It’s hugely demoralising and I think it’s one of the main causes of staff turnover.

In my experience managers who micro manage tend to be new to management, and are trying hard to prove themselves.

#16 Lifesgood

Posted 06 December 2019 - 06:55 PM

Micromanagers are risk averse and afraid of accountability. They are constantly in fear of being blamed for something going wrong. They trust no one and are incapable of seeing the big picture, so they overly focus on the detail in the hope it will save them from being caught out. Many are incompetent themselves and are trying to cover this up. I worked for one previously and it nearly broke me. Now I look back and understand why his nails were always bitten to the point of bleeding and he was thin as a rake. I hope he has ulcers too.

#17 Cerridwen

Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:20 PM

I'm a registered nurse and 4 months of being micromanaged almost broke me.

I consider myself a fairly tough nut to crack. I have experience and post grad qualifications. I have taken on relief managerial roles when required and was good at it. I left a secure full time position, to take up a role as a clinical manager. I hoped it was going to be my dream job. Management at the new job certainly made it seem that way, with talk of being part of a respected team, prospects of expansion within the organisation and therefore would be able to use my qualifications and experience to make a real difference.

Yeah? Nah!

"Cerridwen come and sit in my office for most of the day and listen to me talk sh*te about how fab I am. Watch me do stuff on my computer and we can pretend I am training you." Let us waste 4 out of 7.5 hours of the day in these useless "meetings."

"Oh Cerridwen, why have you not done a complete nursing assessment on Mrs Bogs in room 30? Don't you think she needs one? Don't go to lunch unless you give me a morning handover."

"Cerridwen, do you realise that you have not closed out all the incident reports for the week? Oh but before you do that, come into my parlour, um I mean office,  and waste the rest of the day, so I can berate you tomorrow for not doing the stuff you didn't get done today. Cerridwen, you are not managing to keep on top of the incident reporting."

Cerridwen, we are very short of RNs at the moment, you will need to be on call tonight because we don't have any RNs on duty. Don't worry if you don't get any sleep, you can start at 9am tomorrow instead of 7 am. Oh you had to stay back and do 2 hours overtime every day this week because you spent all day in meetings with me? Well you need to work on your time management so that does not keep happening."

"Do not leave the premises before you tell me all about the phone call with Mrs Blogs daughter. I need to know that you handled her well because she is not happy with me and I need to make sure you know how to talk to family members and not upset them. Oh don't forget to handover to me anything and everything that anyone at all may have said or thought before you leave."

"I need you to send me a draft of any email you intend to send out so I can approve it."

"Oh you are having a family meeting with Mr Magoo's family? At 3? You didn't tell me it was at 3? I only know because I checked your calendar. It is IMPERATIVE that you keep me informed of all things at all times, before they happen, or in case they might happen so that I know you are managing your role."

I thought I did well. I lasted 4 months. 9 months later I still feel angry and sad and I feel incompetent and stupid. I have a fabulous job now, with great management but my confidence is still suffering badly at times. I have started a new role in case management and work on the ward and in the nursing home as well. The variety is really good for me at the moment and helping me to recover some of the confidence I lost from that awful experience.

#18 Cerridwen

Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:24 PM

View PostLifesgood, on 06 December 2019 - 06:55 PM, said:

Micromanagers are risk averse and afraid of accountability. They are constantly in fear of being blamed for something going wrong. They trust no one and are incapable of seeing the big picture, so they overly focus on the detail in the hope it will save them from being caught out. Many are incompetent themselves and are trying to cover this up. I worked for one previously and it nearly broke me. Now I look back and understand why his nails were always bitten to the point of bleeding and he was thin as a rake. I hope he has ulcers too.

Mine was an alcoholic. Would get so drunk in her office that she would not be able to drive home and so would sleep it off in her office, then get up and work the day, in the same clothes. Ulcers would be too nice for her.

#19 Mollyksy

Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:37 PM

Cerridwen, oh wow. That is horrendous.

I feel for all of you. I barely survived it. The woman was ironically my mat relief then parachuted in management. Could talk the talk but I couldnt even send an email asking a question if she hadn't rewritten the death out of it. Nearly broke me. She finally was shuffled off sideways in the age old way of making it some other person's problem. This was the woman who after I told her MIL didnt have long, she had been moved to palliative care, and a few weeks later MIL passed.i came to work but asked to leave the whole of one hour early and she went bonkers. How dare I. It was so inconvenient. I didn't give her enough notice!!

#20 PoolsideMasterchef

Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:53 PM

My current manager is great which is why I plan to stick around.

Ive heard it said that a lot of people micromanage because they don't really know what they are doing. They've ended up in a position where they are over their head and its their way of keeping afloat. I will say it does seem to be true of the 2 times its happened to me.

#21 Silverstreak

Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:56 PM

Ugh, I worked for a micromanager for one day only and that was enough. I was pretty competent at writing up reports and the person I usually reported to would only make a couple of minor corrections where necessary and would make sure to praise me.

Then, I had to fill in for someone else and their supervisor was a shocker. Every line of the pages I wrote had corrections all the way through it and sentences were reversed, so that they said the same thing a slightly different way, with arrows pointing everywhere. Argh, so many arrows.

After they handed me their pages of arrows, this particular supervisor sat me down and lectured me on how I needed to pay more attention. That really did a number on my confidence, I tell you!

TLDR, micromanagers suck, they just stress everybody else out and unnecessarily complicate things.

Cerridwen, that's a shocker!

#22 JRA

Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:58 PM

I don’t. I don’t even see anyone most of the time.

That said every week my students fill in an evaluation of the course which also includes scoring me over 4 diffferent questions, so in affect I get evaluated every week

Edited by JRA, 06 December 2019 - 07:58 PM.


#23 Lifesgood

Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:59 PM

View PostCerridwen, on 06 December 2019 - 07:24 PM, said:

Mine was an alcoholic. Would get so drunk in her office that she would not be able to drive home and so would sleep it off in her office, then get up and work the day, in the same clothes. Ulcers would be too nice for her.
You could almost feel sorry for her.....except not.

#24 night jasmine

Posted 06 December 2019 - 08:00 PM

.

Edited by night jasmine, 07 December 2019 - 08:51 AM.


#25 Cerridwen

Posted 06 December 2019 - 08:05 PM

View Postanon039, on 06 December 2019 - 03:54 PM, said:

I’m a registered nurse. This means that I’ve got a degree and can practice in that role and it’s expected that I know what I’m doing, especially after many years of working.
In the last few years I’ve noticed more and more a trend that I feel nurses as a whole are being micromanaged. I’m sure this happens across the board in many other professions.
Do you think this contributes to burnout and makes an employee feel undervalued and deameaned? I certainly do to the point of thinking about a complete career change.
Interested in what others think.

Sorry. I just realised I got so wrapped up in getting that out that I didn't answer your questions. Yes to burnout and it happened very quickly to me. I don't cry much at all. I cried every day after the first 2 weeks into the job because I felt like I was drowning. Or suffocating.

Undervalued and demeaned? Yes and I believe it is their intent to make us feel that way. To put us in our place and as a way of hiding their own complete incompetence.

Career change? Not sure. I sometimes wish I had chosen another profession but I have switched to case management which is very different but still requires my nursing skills. A nursing degree gives a lot of scope for change.




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