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Learning resources for school holidays?


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#1 Ozquoll

Posted 10 December 2019 - 09:49 AM

So, with summer holidays nearly upon us (arghh!) I am looking for resources to help my 6yo DS retain the reading/writing/'rithmetic he has picked up in FYOS. I'm told it's pretty common for kids in the early years of school to forget quite a lot over the long summer break. I plan to keep reading to him daily, and getting him to read a book to me every day. I also found some age-appropriate maths practice stuff for him on Khan Academy, which is great but I would prefer to minimise the screen time.

He already has, and enjoys, the ABC Reading Eggs activity books. When he was a bit younger he liked the huge A3 activity books from Target, but they may be a little young for him now. Would love suggestions of similar stuff that will keep him busy and learning over the holidays.

Edited by Ozquoll, 10 December 2019 - 09:50 AM.


#2 jayskette

Posted 10 December 2019 - 09:53 AM

kumon activity books

#3 Elly_Bells

Posted 10 December 2019 - 09:55 AM

Writing - best idea is to keep a holiday diary/journal. Write a couple of sentences regularly, stick in pictures, souvenirs etc. But it needs to be fun, not a chore.

Reading - Reading Eggs is great, even 15 mins a day should keep his reading going. See if the school will let you borrow some readers for the holidays.

Maths - counting together out loud and with materials (can you count all the pegs in this bag for me please), you asking him to solve maths problems mentally (we have 10 biscuits - if you eat 3, how many will we have left?) Mathletics is great on the computer.

There are great resources online but if you don't want too much screen time, adult-input in the way of questions, chatting, writing together etc is the best way to keep the learning going.

#4 Kiwi Bicycle

Posted 10 December 2019 - 10:07 AM

Handwriting practise books ( you can get Vic cursive ones, QBD was great for sourcing those). Photocopy the pages to get multiple uses.
I brought a set of 12 phonic readers from Scholastic this year plus will pull out all the baby board books for reading as well.
QBD had a really cool series of write on, wipe off maths books which had a pull down tab to reveal the answers. They had addition and subtraction etc and with answers makes it a semi independent activity.
Get random items and practise making sets ( things the same colour, things the same shape etc).
Craft activities like making cards etc

#5 JomoMum

Posted 10 December 2019 - 10:17 AM

Our 6yo is just about finished FYOS also. I was going to get some of those syllabus state specific activity books from the Newsagent, he loved doing the Kindy ones at the beginning of the year.  

He also has a diary that we encourage him to write in after story/reading time at night for 10-15 mins.

By nature, he thinks very mathematically anyway so we just explain things as he asks.

He also has reading eggs, though he’s moved onto reading eggspress now which, while the language concepts are appropriate for him, the speed of the type of games is a little beyond him for now, so we may find some other apps for occasional use.

#6 PrincessPeach

Posted 10 December 2019 - 10:17 AM

Teach monster to read is a good app for reading practice if your DS is like mine & abit reluctant to read a book

#7 Ozquoll

Posted 10 December 2019 - 10:24 AM

View PostPrincessPeach, on 10 December 2019 - 10:17 AM, said:

Teach monster to read is a good app for reading practice if your DS is like mine & abit reluctant to read a book
Hehe, TeachMonster is what I give DS to play when I want to rummage through an Op Shop in peace 😄!

#8 Ellie bean

Posted 10 December 2019 - 05:53 PM

I would ask his teacher, we just had a chat to dd’s Teacher about what would be the best things to do with her over the break and also whether there were any particular things she needs to focus on. Answer was basically reading (with focus on a couple of areas where she could do with improvement) and keeping up her mathletics.

#9 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 10 December 2019 - 07:12 PM

I read this post to DD , primary teacher who suggested cooking, measuring etc.
Also a child who is refreshed from having a holiday will be much more eager to learn on return to school.
Six is still in the early years of development, play based learning, dough, sand, water play etc is really effective to cement knowledge. It needs to be about unstructured self discovery,  not workbooks.

#10 seayork2002

Posted 10 December 2019 - 07:15 PM

We were told reading (anything) and just basic writing and cooking back in FYOS

#11 JomoMum

Posted 10 December 2019 - 07:20 PM

View PostPhillipaCrawford, on 10 December 2019 - 07:12 PM, said:

I read this post to DD , primary teacher who suggested cooking, measuring etc.
Also a child who is refreshed from having a holiday will be much more eager to learn on return to school.
Six is still in the early years of development, play based learning, dough, sand, water play etc is really effective to cement knowledge. It needs to be about unstructured self discovery,  not workbooks.

I think a combination of the above can work well - our son chooses to do workbooks from his craft drawer which is ok too :)

#12 PrincessPeach

Posted 10 December 2019 - 07:24 PM

View PostPhillipaCrawford, on 10 December 2019 - 07:12 PM, said:

I read this post to DD , primary teacher who suggested cooking, measuring etc.
Also a child who is refreshed from having a holiday will be much more eager to learn on return to school.
Six is still in the early years of development, play based learning, dough, sand, water play etc is really effective to cement knowledge. It needs to be about unstructured self discovery,  not workbooks.

Actually if i think of the progress ds has made with speech therapy, he always has made his leaps during a break. It kind of gave his brain time to consolidate the information he had learnt.

#13 Ozquoll

Posted 10 December 2019 - 07:33 PM

View PostPhillipaCrawford, on 10 December 2019 - 07:12 PM, said:

I read this post to DD , primary teacher who suggested cooking, measuring etc.
Also a child who is refreshed from having a holiday will be much more eager to learn on return to school.
Six is still in the early years of development, play based learning, dough, sand, water play etc is really effective to cement knowledge. It needs to be about unstructured self discovery,  not workbooks.
Thank you, I do appreciate your response. Unfortunately a lot of these suggestions don't work for my DS, possibly because of his ASD. He hates sand and playdough, won't cook with me nowadays (he used to) because he associates it with us trying to get him to try new foods (he is an extremely selective eater). He's honestly pretty terrible at unstructured play and always has been 🤷. He genuinely enjoys doing the workbooks for some reason, so that's why I wanted to continue with them over the holidays. I also found towards the end of the year he was getting de-motivated by still being in a quite low classification for reading, so I really want to make sure he keeps practising over the holidays.

#14 Backtoschoolchef

Posted 10 December 2019 - 07:59 PM

IXL maths is a good one here. Reading eggs?

#15 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 11 December 2019 - 06:15 AM

Sorry I didn't realise you had additional needs thrown into the mix.
Unstructured play is not then going to work.

What about lots of boxes for creating a box city, replicating the area? You could use tape instead of glue
Work books are probably enjoyed because of the clarity but what you really want is a way of encouraging him to think a bit laterally.
He could label all the houses. Use lego to populate it.

Is there a cheapy digital camera you could use so he could photograph local things that take his interest and you could create a story about them?

Also when you are reading, and the local library is a good source of 'reading' books, see if he is more willing to take risks when it is just the two of you, it maybe that he is worried about not doing well with others.

A nature walk/scavenger hunt where he as to read simple words or identify signs around the local area.

#16 Chelara

Posted 11 December 2019 - 06:31 AM

Board games, monopoly, rummikub, uno, cards, battleship, mastermind are all good thinking games that they can start to play properly at that age. I’m sure there are plenty of others as well.

#17 PooksLikeChristmas

Posted 11 December 2019 - 06:41 AM

Libraries usually have readers, DS likes being able to pick his own. This year he’s developing is blog and he’ll be in charge of grocery shopping.

#18 AllyK81

Posted 11 December 2019 - 06:49 AM

We do lots of reading, some workbooks (my DS loves them too) but using things we do as springbaords for learning. We spend summers at our beach house so we read lots of books together about the ocean, volcanos (our little beach town is on volcanic rock), moons/tides etc.

#19 scooty

Posted 11 December 2019 - 08:50 AM

Scribblenauts!!

I have used this game with much success for my DS when he was in grade 1. It was so much fun for him to play. It helped him with both reading and spelling. He had to be creative and thinking outside the box. I also loved playing along with him.

Heresa trailer (although it doesnt do it justice!): https://www.youtube....h?v=iUk2_xQ3yC0

Heres a couple of articles about how the game can help with language skils.

https://venturebeat....e-learning-fun/

https://edition.cnn....eeds/index.html

#20 MayaTheGrinch

Posted 11 December 2019 - 09:00 AM

Board and card games are great for maths. My weird maths kid likes to play roll a sum.

Reading is check out the library. If you have a children’s librarian they will be able to point you at appropriate level texts and might even have readers. Ours has the entire Fitzroy readers collection which are proper decodable readers.

We do structured homework type things over the holidays because if I don’t the oldest kid (asd) gets frustrated and hates the holidays. Last summer holidays we just did an hour a day and god he was so much happier. He’s does like the looser structure (he thrives on the school routine and structure).

#21 Ozquoll

Posted 11 December 2019 - 12:52 PM

View Postscooty, on 11 December 2019 - 08:50 AM, said:

Scribblenauts!!

I have used this game with much success for my DS when he was in grade 1. It was so much fun for him to play. It helped him with both reading and spelling. He had to be creative and thinking outside the box. I also loved playing along with him.

Heresa trailer (although it doesnt do it justice!): https://www.youtube....h?v=iUk2_xQ3yC0

Heres a couple of articles about how the game can help with language skils.

https://venturebeat....e-learning-fun/

https://edition.cnn....eeds/index.html
Any game with Cthulhu in it is going to be a hit around my household of nerds 😅!




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