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Advice on Mr Two's temper tantrums - hitting, biting self & others


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#51 SkyFluff

Posted 30 December 2019 - 08:54 PM

View PostChaotic Pogo, on 30 December 2019 - 08:04 PM, said:

Unfortunately it gets harder if you are regional.

The first thing you learn with early intervention is that you cannot rely on the system to look after you, or even refer you to the correct type of therapist or specialist. It all falls on the parents, to work out what to do, and to make it actually happen.

You have the advantage of being the expert in your child, but limited experience in exactly what is developmentally usual at various ages. EB is invaluable for ideas and suggestions.

A screening assessment tool that includes videos of ‘usual’ kids and ASD kids is   http://asdetect.org/

It  was created by LaTrobe University. This could help you consider any ASD flags compared to a usual kid. It helps you know what to look for.

If it doesn’t seem like your child, you should still be getting a dev paed assessment but start looking into any other relevant things while you wait to see them. The more general understanding of things you have, the better spent your time with the dev paed will be.

BTW, having seen a speech therapist, I would assume your child has had a hearing test? It’s the first thing dev paeds ask for but you don’t require a referral to get one and it’s good to have before you go to the appointment.

Yes he's had the hearing tests & it all came back normal from the audiology side of things. I did the ASDetect & it says "low risk" of ASD. Still definitely going to seek more professional assessments of course. He pretty much does everything milestone related other than the speech side of things which is why we'be been seeing a SP since 18 months because already at 18mo I was seeing him falling a bit behind.

#52 SkyFluff

Posted 30 December 2019 - 08:59 PM

View PostPrincessPeach, on 30 December 2019 - 08:18 PM, said:



It's 3-5 years for the gold coast without a diagnosis.

My eldest is speech delayed (verbal apraxia) & initially our speech therapist had us doing makaton signs with him, they were super helpful for the short term until he learnt how to say the sound.

NDIS early intervention is really hard to get for speech issues alone, you also need to show a serious delay in other areas - so dont just rely on the speech not being there. We were knocked back from it & that was with a diagnosis.

But I'd certainly get a different speech therapist, the issues with gagging & then speech sounds very similar to characteristics of oral apraxia.

I'm waiting on a call back for a transfer for DS to see a different SP.  Other than making animal sounds & saying "yes" and "poo" the only complete word or string of words (he has a few & infrequent uses them) he can say is
"oh dear"
"dad car"
"mum boob"
Those are the only 2 word things, and of course can say all those words individually.

#53 afterlaughter

Posted 31 December 2019 - 10:55 AM

I would have his hearing checked again. Recurrent glue ear can cause significant hearing loss and speech delays. But it can also be clear a week here and there and hearing back to normal only to return causing significant hearing loss a week later.

#54 PrincessPeach

Posted 31 December 2019 - 01:21 PM

View PostSkyFluff, on 30 December 2019 - 08:59 PM, said:

I'm waiting on a call back for a transfer for DS to see a different SP.  Other than making animal sounds & saying "yes" and "poo" the only complete word or string of words (he has a few & infrequent uses them) he can say is
"oh dear"
"dad car"
"mum boob"
Those are the only 2 word things, and of course can say all those words individually.

He certainly should have more words than that - 50 minumum (including animal noises & part words, like bot for bottle).

Keep on pushing for answers, the temper tantrums can exist purely due to the frustration from lack of speech but they can also be part of something else so don't let anyone write that off just yet.

#55 BusbyWilkes

Posted 31 December 2019 - 03:34 PM

Hi OP. Good on you for seeking early support for your DS and for trying to change services now that you can see things aren’t progressing for him.

I agree that contact with your local NDIS agency is essential (given that you aren’t in a position to
use private services). I’m not in your area but if anyone has info on mid-north coast of NSW, please post it. Contact ASAP to find out when you can meet with a planner, the continue with your current plan.

Ask your MCHN to do an Ages and Stages checklist (or something similar. Call before hand to let her know, as you may need a longer apt. This looks at communication, comprehension, play, gross motor skills, fine motor skills, emotional dev and self care skills. A copy of this can be used for the NDIS supporting documentation. Based on info you’ve provided, he may have delays in communication, emotional development and self care (eating).  More than 1 area means eligible for NDIS.

Ask to swap to nearer clinic for SP. I find it highly inappropriate that your current SP has cancelled scheduled apts for training and holidays without making alternate times. Also ask for an assessment by an OT. Request to be waitlisted, even if it takes a while. Some of the limited food options and “stubbornness” may be his way of dealing with sensory processing issues, that he doesn’t have the language to explain to you.

Key word signing (either Makaton and Auslan) is great. It promotes communication and language development, so don’t be worried that it will slow his speech development. I’d recommend picking 5 or so at the most to start with.Good first signs include help, more, finished, eat, drink.

Ask GP for referral to developmental paed for full assessment.

Apologies for the novel I’ve written! You’re doing a great job with him (and I’m sure will continue to do as you
figure out what’s going on and how best to help him). Good luck.

Edited by BusbyWilkes, 31 December 2019 - 03:40 PM.


#56 SkyFluff

Posted 01 January 2020 - 11:47 AM

View PostPrincessPeach, on 31 December 2019 - 01:21 PM, said:



He certainly should have more words than that - 50 minumum (including animal noises & part words, like bot for bottle).

Keep on pushing for answers, the temper tantrums can exist purely due to the frustration from lack of speech but they can also be part of something else so don't let anyone write that off just yet.
He has quite a few sounds but not so much words, I'll see if I can list them:

Sounds:
Moo
Baa baa
Neigh
Blob blob (fish)
Oink
Sss (snake)
Brrr (elephant sound)
Rawr rawr (lion, dino)
Zzzz (for bee/fly)

Words:
Mum/mumma/mummy
Dad/dadda/daddy
Yeah/ss (yes variant)
Noo noo (just stated this recently, usually he'd shake his head for no)
Poo
There
Car
Ooodle (noodl)
Ubbl (bubble)
Ear (here)
Oh
Dear
Boob
aH (water)
FFh (fish/flower)
Cat
Eee (tree)

Those are what I can remember from the top of my head. I think he has about 30ish total sounds and words (I know I'm missing some on the list).

He understands very well, and can do complex tasks, for example I can say finish your drink and put it in the sink, and he'll do exactly that. Or I could say "get your jacket & shoes & bring them to mummy" he'll get those things and do it perfectly.

I've been doing some research into sign & also found a learn to talk video by a SP on youtube which also demonstrates it to help me learn. DS saw me flipping through  it and showed a surprising amount of intrest

Someome suggested saying "gentle hands" and we started that today when he got frustrated with his car door & started hitting it, I said "gentle hands please" and he stopped right away and started stroking the car softly and then gave it a hug. He got lots of praise, and continued playing with the toy like normal.

I'm still awaiting the call from the intake line (it's not a manned phone, you leave a message and they call back). Hoping they get back to me soon.

#57 HolierThanCow

Posted 01 January 2020 - 01:04 PM

That sounds similar to my son at that age. After two early talkers, he (my 3rd child) is 'borderline' late, but seems to just reach the milestone a week or two before the relevant age. I think he said his first two word sentence at 23 months. He still goes through stages of babbling, then seems to come back with more words. He is 30 months now and still babbles sometimes, but then says a few 3 or 4 word sentences (or you can understand parts of the babbling and see he's trying to express something more complicated than his language development allows). He doesn't reach the levels of frustration that you are describing, however... that's what would be of the most concern to me (I mean more than the specific number of words he says).

Efs

Edited by HolierThanCow, 01 January 2020 - 01:05 PM.


#58 SkyFluff

Posted 01 January 2020 - 02:12 PM

View PostHolierThanCow, on 01 January 2020 - 01:04 PM, said:

That sounds similar to my son at that age. After two early talkers, he (my 3rd child) is 'borderline' late, but seems to just reach the milestone a week or two before the relevant age. I think he said his first two word sentence at 23 months. He still goes through stages of babbling, then seems to come back with more words. He is 30 months now and still babbles sometimes, but then says a few 3 or 4 word sentences (or you can understand parts of the babbling and see he's trying to express something more complicated than his language development allows). He doesn't reach the levels of frustration that you are describing, however... that's what would be of the most concern to me (I mean more than the specific number of words he says).

Efs

Yes I'm not sure if it's something that runs in the family (if that's even possible), my mother said that when I was a child I had horrid tantrums & they had no idea what about.  DH was also terrible when it came to explosive tantrums, DH was also a bit of a late talker, his sisters two boys (our nephews) at two also didn't talk a whole heap.

I know on my side of the family, my cousin was almost 3 until he started talking. Just the boys in the family it seems, the girls were all early talkers. I don't know if it's something that can even run in families or if it's just a coincidence.

But I'd rather follow it up with early intervention then just say "it's normal", in case it is something we want to get him all the help we can early.




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