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Split Kindergarten Class


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#1 imme

Posted 20 January 2020 - 03:58 PM

My daughter is starting her first year of school this year (Kindergarten in Tasmania).  The school she will be attending has had to split their kindy kids because there were so many being enrolled for this year and put some of them in with a Prep class, including my daughter.  Kindergarten is 3 full days a week, Monday, Wednesday and Friday and Prep is 5 full days a week.

Has anyone had a situation like this where a chunk of the class is part time and the rest are full time?  How were the dynamics did you think?  I have no issue with combined classes at all, all the older years are combined grades so this will be the norm going forward, but I do wonder how it all tends to work when some of the class are only there some days.

We are supposed to be having a short interview with the teacher before she starts, but I'm not sure when that will be as they haven't contacted us yet.  I've not personally seen a split like this before so was wondering if anyone else had and how they thought it worked out.

Thanks  :)

#2 Jingleflea

Posted 20 January 2020 - 04:17 PM

So she's doing what we call preschool with a kindy(FYOS) class?

I haven't heard of that before, only FYOS with a year 1 class, both 5 days a week.

#3 AllyK81

Posted 20 January 2020 - 04:29 PM

DD is going to an Anglican girls K-12 school this year for kindergarten.

Some of the kinder girls are full time and some are 3 days a week.

So not unusual in my experience for some full time and some part time.

I think it is a bit odd to combine kinder and prep though because kinder is still play based learning whilst prep has more of a syllabus, albeit that might be different in Tassie.

I suspect the kinder kids will probably naturally gravitate together.

#4 Crombek

Posted 20 January 2020 - 04:33 PM

Hmmm can you say approximately which Tassie region and if private/public? I work in the area and it's not something I've ever seen. I have seen a rolling class, where there are 3 lots of kids rotated across 2 rooms, 3 days a week each.

#5 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 20 January 2020 - 04:34 PM

I can't see how the the teacher will be able to offer an appropriate play based experience in a prep classroom.

I would inquire how the kindergarten is meeting ACECQA requirements and the National Quality framework.

DS was in a prep/one class and all my kids have been in composites so within the primary setting it isn't unknown but IMO it's like mixing final primary and first year high

#6 Fizgig

Posted 20 January 2020 - 04:38 PM

I'm in WA but my friends kids were both in a split kindy/pre-primary class. Half the class 5 days a fortnight, the other half were full time. It worked fine, especially for the kids ready to be stretched. I would imagine that there would be some generalist teaching and then when the Preps needed further teaching the kinder kids would be off for play or table top activities. It works out fine and the teachers are quite skilled at differentiating.

#7 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 20 January 2020 - 04:49 PM

We did something similar in Tas. Small school. We thought it worked well.

#8 PocketIcikleflakes

Posted 20 January 2020 - 04:50 PM

I'm in WA as well and this has been done each year that I've had kids at our school. It works really well, though this school does try to get a composite for each year so they are very experienced.

#9 Heather11

Posted 20 January 2020 - 04:50 PM

I don't know how preschool works in Tasmania and what the expectations are but I think it would be difficult.

I know in SA preschooli is very play based.  Apart from maybe a couple of times a session where they might do group mat time, the children are free to chose their own activities.  Two of mine spent the majority of time outside playing in the sandpit. They could choose if they wanted to craft activities etc.

#10 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 20 January 2020 - 04:59 PM

View PostHeather11, on 20 January 2020 - 04:50 PM, said:

I don't know how preschool works in Tasmania and what the expectations are but I think it would be difficult.

I know in SA preschooli is very play based.  Apart from maybe a couple of times a session where they might do group mat time, the children are free to chose their own activities.  Two of mine spent the majority of time outside playing in the sandpit. They could choose if they wanted to craft activities etc.

Thats not my experience with Tas kinder, it was reasonably structured. It was very similar to prep (FYOS) but only 3 days a week.

They attended assembly, did all the sporting carnivals, had PE lessons, music lessons, art lessons and so on, just like normal school. Every one I know just accepts that kinder in Tas is FYOS.

Qld was worlds apart and I am not a fan of the way its done in other states personally.

Tas was much more structured and it gave a better intro to prep in our experience than the way Qld does it.

#11 CrankyM

Posted 20 January 2020 - 05:03 PM

I’ve had a child who has been in the kindy side of this and the prep side of it (WA). If the teacher is good it can run really well. It is school dependent though. Our school makes sure that prep is still very much play based but also structured so it fits well with the kindy kids. Most of the games and fun bits are extended for the older kids or they do different groups. The teacher my kids had was very experienced and knowledgeable and managed it well. Kindy kids didn’t attend assembly or the specialists lessons though so they were schedules on the days the kindy kids didn’t attend. But everyone did library and PE and the kindy kids had their own althetics carnival.

Edited by MayaTheGrinch, 20 January 2020 - 05:05 PM.


#12 qak

Posted 20 January 2020 - 05:08 PM

I'm not clear which year the OPs DD is in, but I agree that mixing pre-schoolers with FYOS is odd (aren't they regulated & funded differently? Maybe this is a private school?)

#13 CrankyM

Posted 20 January 2020 - 05:11 PM

View Postqak, on 20 January 2020 - 05:08 PM, said:

I'm not clear which year the OPs DD is in, but I agree that mixing pre-schoolers with FYOS is odd (aren't they regulated & funded differently? Maybe this is a private school?)

Not in TAS or WA or SA. Education dept is responsible for them in most cases. My kids attended 4yr kindy (preschool) at school 5 days a fortnight. Uniform, bells, lunch boxes etc. Then went into prep/FYOS. My TAS friends and most of my SA friends says their state is very similar. My kid’s call them the teenies now and love when they get to buddy up and show the kindy kids around.

Edited by MayaTheGrinch, 20 January 2020 - 05:12 PM.


#14 Heather11

Posted 20 January 2020 - 05:12 PM

View Postqak, on 20 January 2020 - 05:08 PM, said:

I'm not clear which year the OPs DD is in, but I agree that mixing pre-schoolers with FYOS is odd (aren't they regulated & funded differently? Maybe this is a private school?)

It seems to be common in WA and Tas where preschools are situated on school sites.

Not only funding but staffing ratios would be different too.

#15 CrankyM

Posted 20 January 2020 - 05:13 PM

View PostHeather11, on 20 January 2020 - 05:12 PM, said:



It seems to be common in WA and Tas where preschools are situated on school sites.

Not only funding but staffing ratios would be different too.
Ratio in WA is 1:12 for kindy and prep. At least it is at the public schools in my area. All the kindy and prep classes have an aide most of the time too to help with this ratio.

Edited by MayaTheGrinch, 20 January 2020 - 05:14 PM.


#16 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 20 January 2020 - 05:14 PM

View Postqak, on 20 January 2020 - 05:08 PM, said:

I'm not clear which year the OPs DD is in, but I agree that mixing pre-schoolers with FYOS is odd (aren't they regulated & funded differently? Maybe this is a private school?)

It’s not odd for some states.

The OPs DD is in kinder which other states call preschool. Most of Tas regards this as FYOS, as it’s part of schools unlike other states. Even though it’s non compulsory most kids go to kinder.

#17 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 20 January 2020 - 05:19 PM

In Victoria Kindergarten is the year before school

When I taught kindergarten in Tasmania  the two were identical, same name , same curriculum.

It would be so much easier if we could have the same names for the same educational stages.

What happens at Kindergarten?

At Kindergarten children:
  • Learn through play and activities planned by the teacher guided by the Early Years Learning Framework.
  • Play with other children and discover, create, improvise and imagine.
  • Test out their ideas, ask questions and expand their thinking.
  • Use a wide range of equipment specially designed to support their learning.
  • Spend time playing and learning as part of small and large groups and on their own.
  • Build independence, confidence and skills for getting along with others.
  • Develop literacy and numeracy skills and learn about the world around them.
When does your child go to Kindergarten?
  • Kindergarten is play-based learning. Registered teachers use play as a fun way of engaging your child in learning.
  • Most Kindergartens in Tasmania are situated on a primary school site.
  • If your child is four years old on 1 January in any year they can go to Kindergarten.
  • Your child will be able to attend Kindergarten for 15 hours a week.
  • Sessions may be half day or full day depending on the school.
https://www.educatio...<br /> <br /> Edited because I thought I should check the Tas government site, seems identical to Victorian kindergarten to me.

Edited by PhillipaCrawford, 20 January 2020 - 05:22 PM.


#18 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 20 January 2020 - 05:20 PM

View PostPhillipaCrawford, on 20 January 2020 - 05:19 PM, said:

In Victoria Kindergarten is the year before school

When I taught kindergarten in Tasmania  the two were identical, same name , same curriculum.

It would be so much easier if we could have the same names for the same educational stages

Yes it would. Along with a standard intake period and age.

It would be really helpful for families that move states.

#19 born.a.girl

Posted 20 January 2020 - 05:25 PM

I'm in Vic, and I'm actually in favour of kinders being on a school campus, within reason.  (As in, build new schools with a kinder built in.)


I think because kinder started as something that few people did (no one I went to school with, in the fifties, had been to kinder) it started up separately.  Which I think is unfortunate.

Surely the whole shebang should be a gradual introduction into formal learning, starting with play based.

#20 eponee

Posted 20 January 2020 - 05:51 PM

At the primary school my kids went to in northern Tasmania, it was kinder - year 6.

There was Kinder A and Kinder B.  A went Mon,Tues & Wed; B went Wed, Thu and Fri, then went on to prep and after that it was composite classes

I've never heard of kinders sharing a class with preps.

#21 imme

Posted 20 January 2020 - 06:18 PM

All these different names for what seems to be the same thing are very confusing!

My children will be attending a public Southern Eastern Shore school, for that person who wanted a rough area, sorry I cannot remember your username! :blush:

Preschool for us is play based learning that is not on a school campus (long day care).  My daughter has done 1 day a week of this for the last few months in preparation for being away from home for school.  Kindergarten is first year of school and is on a school campus, but not compulsory, although I think pretty much everyone seems to do it.  My experience of Kindergarten with my now 10 year old son was that it was quite structured, they learned to read, spell, do maths, etc. although this was in a private school, but I assume it is the same in public schools.

Hopefully this is something that ends up running really well and there are no issues.  I guess I'm just slightly concerned as it is my daughter's very first year at school and so much learning goes on in that first year that prepares them for full-time school, something that is so very different to anything any of the kids have experienced yet!

Perhaps they've chosen kids they feel will cope with the situation better than others might... my daughter is too confident for her own boots and too bright for us to handle a lot of the time too!  I don't think she will have any issues separating and she's very forthright so probably wouldn't be put off by older kids.

I guess I'll find out more at the talk with her teacher, I'm sure she's got it all worked out.  I already feel for the poor woman taking on my lovely, but contrary child :ph34r:

Edited by imme, 20 January 2020 - 06:20 PM.


#22 SeaPrincess

Posted 20 January 2020 - 07:05 PM

DD’s kindy year (WA, part time kindy, on primary school campus) had 2 full classes plus a small group who were combined with a FYOS (Pre-Primary) class. I’ve got no idea idea about classroom activities, but the kindy/pre-primary playground is completely separate from the rest of the school, so the children knew each other by the end of the year and when either year group had excursions or incursions, the small group combined with one of the kindy classes.

It hasn’t happened again. The following year, we had 3 full kindy classes, and since then, back to just 2.

#23 liveworkplay

Posted 20 January 2020 - 07:23 PM

Have 3 kids in the Tasmanian school system. It is not a scenario I would be happy with. Prep and Kinder, although similar, are vastly different in expectations and unless your child is on the older side (one of mine in  Jan baby so was 5 before starting Kinder and dong simple maths and writing sentences before she started) I think the expectations of Prep would be too much initially. If my May baby was put in that situation (she started Kinder only recognising part of the alphabet) she would have hated it.

I am also not sure how they logistically  would do it as the early learning frame work that Kinder falls under is quite different to the FYOS Aus curriculum criteria.

Edited by liveworkplay, 20 January 2020 - 07:29 PM.


#24 Jelly11

Posted 20 January 2020 - 07:38 PM

The school I work at has done this in the past (Tas) when numbers were difficult to split otherwise. While difficult it was managed. (Not my class but I saw a bit of it). For it to work I think they need a really good teacher assistant who is confident to run groups as this was often how they made it work when the kinders and preps were doing different things. Most schools are trying to implement more play based activities for preps anyway so this can fit in well with the kinders and there is time for more structured work with a smaller group of preps on the non kinder days. While it's not the ideal situation, it can work with the right staff, planning and environment.

#25 liveworkplay

Posted 20 January 2020 - 07:54 PM

Kinder VS Prep standards for comparison




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