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#1 bubskitkat

Posted 27 January 2020 - 07:07 PM

Has anyone here had any experience with the share market?

Any recommendations for secure shares with growth?



#2 Ocean waves

Posted 27 January 2020 - 07:16 PM

I find the barefoot investor a good place to start - sign onto his free newsletter and see what you think. You can buy or borrow his book if you Like his style/approach.


#3 Moo-me

Posted 27 January 2020 - 07:17 PM

I wouldn’t take recommendations online or even give recommendations or financial advise on here or online in general. I work in the industry. There’s lots to consider including different types of financial products. You’re best talking to a financial adviser and contacting a broker service.

#4 PrincessPeach

Posted 27 January 2020 - 07:25 PM

Warren buffet is a big guru in shares & his advertised #1 tip is invest in companies you use or know what they do.

So if you visit bunnings every second day then buying shares in wesfarmers would be a logical idea. Or you bank with one of the majors, then buy shares in your bank.

#5 tothebeach

Posted 27 January 2020 - 07:26 PM

Either talk to a financial planner or just use an index fund.  If you don’t know what you are doing and don’t have lots of money, then an index fund may be easiest.

Don’t consider this financial advice as it does not take into account your individual circumstances.

#6 (feral)epg

Posted 27 January 2020 - 07:42 PM

Option 1. - outsource it to someone else via either a broker (costs lots and doesn't necessarily perform better than a dartboard) or managed funds
Option 2. - spend your life researching shares - you may or may not do better than a broker and you certainly won't be paying the high fees
Option 3. - take advice from every random person with an opinion (including EB)
Option 4. - Invest in big companies that you are familiar with and think their products have a future - plenty of people do this with adequate results
Option 5. - invest in companies because you believe in them.  Industries or products that you want to see succeed and don't mind losing a bit of money if they don't (my approach - and it works surprisingly well!)

First step is definitely definitely get some more info.  Read barefoot investor and Michael Whittaker.  Don't read anything that promises to turn you into a millionaire overnight.  If it sounds too good to be true it definitely is.

#7 lizzzard

Posted 27 January 2020 - 09:44 PM

Yes just echoing the advice to seek advice - from a professional (not EB)

#8 FoxinSocks

Posted 27 January 2020 - 10:46 PM

I’m not sure it’s easy to specify “secure shares with growth”. The Stockmarket can be very volatile, even for so-called blue chip investments.

If you have plenty of time, and can afford to lose some of the money you put in, then perhaps open an online brokerage account, and buy a few shares in companies you “like” and broadly understand what they do (E.g. the Wesfarmers suggestion by PP). And then sit back and see what happens.

If you can’t afford to lose any money (even in the short term) then a financial advisor is definitely the way to go.

#9 beccaj

Posted 28 January 2020 - 06:55 AM

we started with reading, Money magazine and the like. Made a 'wish list' of shares and tracked them for a while. Are you looking for short term gain or long term growth and stability?

Do you only want ethical choices out blue chip?

A financial planner can assist you define your goals. We went for a mix of blue chip and startup.

#10 born.a.girl

Posted 28 January 2020 - 06:57 AM

It doesn't really work that way, as per pps.


You first need to establish what your own risk profile looks like.  It's o.k. to be conservative - I'm a conservative investor, I get no thrill out of the chase.


If you are not prepared to lose any money at all, then you can be narrowing your options down to term deposits.

The bottom can fall out of the share market the day after you invest, and even with good quality shares, it might take some time to recover their original value.

Try the ASX site, they even have inexpensive seminars and free webinars that can help you understand what you don't know.  They accommodate complete beginners.  They cover both investing and trading.


If you don't have a very good understanding of your own tax situation, you need to look at that, too.

#11 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 28 January 2020 - 07:39 AM

I’ve dipped my toes in the water using a “spare change” investing thing called Raiz (formerly acorns)
It’s doing really well and is a great start to getting used to the ups and downs of the share market.
Once my Raiz account hits a certain amount, I’m going to consider taking some money out and investing it more directly in some sort of shares as a longer term investment.

Raiz has fees, but I completely cover my fees by using their cash-back deal with woolies. I buy groceries, woolies pays a small %age into the Raiz account. Free money!

Edited by ~LemonMyrtle~, 28 January 2020 - 08:51 AM.


#12 MerryMadrigalMadge

Posted 28 January 2020 - 08:42 AM

Same as PP - have RAIZ, and it’s a set and forget.

I also have a few shares, that I’m not going to sell, in for the long haul - all dividend rev-investment, that I’ve had for almost a decade already - index shares mainly.

#13 born.a.girl

Posted 28 January 2020 - 08:44 AM

View PostMerryMadrigalMadge, on 28 January 2020 - 08:42 AM, said:

Same as PP - have RAIZ, and it’s a set and forget.

I also have a few shares, that I’m not going to sell, in for the long haul - all dividend rev-investment, that I’ve had for almost a decade already - index shares mainly.


Make sure you keep all of your records for the dividend re-investment!


Clearing out my MIL's house, the ONE thing she decided to have a clean up on was their older history of their shares. They didn't have a lot thank goodness because it was a misery getting the six monthly costs bases for the much older transactions.

#14 Sugarplum Poobah

Posted 28 January 2020 - 10:19 AM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 28 January 2020 - 08:44 AM, said:

Make sure you keep all of your records for the dividend re-investment!


Clearing out my MIL's house, the ONE thing she decided to have a clean up on was their older history of their shares. They didn't have a lot thank goodness because it was a misery getting the six monthly costs bases for the much older transactions.

I did a very large spreadsheet for my late mother's (thankfully not too comprehensive) share holdings.  They've been transferred to me and I can tell you that the 3536* partial dividend reinvestments are a great disincentive to ever selling them (although they'd be the accountant's issue, not mine and I do have the records)

*That may be a slight exaggeration ::;:

I was actually coming into this thread to recommend https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/
Lots of very clear information with the aim of making the consumer more financially literate, it's run by ASIC.

Edited by Sugarplum Poobah, 28 January 2020 - 10:20 AM.


#15 BornToLove

Posted 28 January 2020 - 11:40 AM

We started out with a Raiz account but pulled out due to a technical issue (and their response to it).  

We liked the concept of ETFs (what Raiz puts your money in) so invested our funds directly with a few different ones that aligned with our risk profile and objectives. We make lump sum purchases every 3-4 months based on what’s done well and keeps us in our preferred risk profile.

#16 IamOzgirl

Posted 28 January 2020 - 11:54 AM

I second the ASX website.

They have a ‘game’ you can plan using fake money but you are playing on the real stock exchange.

Why not test it out there.

Also if I was going to invest in the stock market I would probably buy into ETFs.

#17 bubskitkat

Posted 28 January 2020 - 09:34 PM

I invested in minimal shares on Friday and today I have lost $100. Im not happy about that.

Thanks for the advice and tips.

I do need to become more educated before I loose another $100. I’m not a high risk type of person

#18 MerryMadrigalMadge

Posted 28 January 2020 - 09:38 PM

That's the nature of the beast - the share market is volatile.

I don't buy shares to make a quick return and sell for profit - I don't have the time or skill.

I also don't check the share price daily, it's too stressful.

#19 Dianalynch

Posted 28 January 2020 - 10:18 PM

Share prices go up and down a lot! Do not frequently check the prices - shares are longer term. A term deposit might suit you better? Or do you have a superannuation fund, put extra into that? Talk to a fin advisor about your risk profile and objectives, they’ll help you out.

#20 BornToLove

Posted 29 January 2020 - 02:28 AM

View PostDianalynch, on 28 January 2020 - 10:18 PM, said:

Share prices go up and down a lot! Do not frequently check the prices - shares are longer term.

I agree. Yesterday was a horrible day. Last week had lots of positive gains. Thankfully the gains from last week haven’t been totally wiped out.

Right now I’m getting ready to purchase more so checking shares more often, but generally I don’t look at them more than once or twice a month when looking at our overall position.

It’s hard if you’re just dipping your toes in the market, but try not to look because you won’t like what you see more frequently than you’d like.

OP, if you are risk adverse I would highly recommend seeking out an adviser. A good adviser can ensure you have peace of mind with your total investment portfolio even when the share market is volatile. Bonds, term deposits or property might be better suited for you as they are generally ‘income’ assets. Share are considered ‘growth’ assets but carry much higher risk.

#21 WaitForMe

Posted 29 January 2020 - 04:07 AM

Motley Fool have been great for us. They have a number of subscriptions where they essentially do the leg work and collate the info and make a recommendation, you can then make an informed decision. We are a member of their Hidden Gems service.

https://www.fool.com...ion-services-2/

Barefoot Investor did something similar but I got the impression he was moving away from it and closing it down as he wants to move into financial counselling and can't do both due to a conflict of interest (or something?).

#22 born.a.girl

Posted 29 January 2020 - 07:51 AM

View Postbubskitkat, on 28 January 2020 - 09:34 PM, said:

I invested in minimal shares on Friday and today I have lost $100. Im not happy about that.

Thanks for the advice and tips.

I do need to become more educated before I loose another $100. I’m not a high risk type of person


Presumably not in the health field then?

All sectors except the health field fell in recent days as a result of the potential economic consequences of the Caronavirus.

Shares almost never increase on a straight trajectory - they're up and down with generally an upward trajectory over time.

I've had shares lose half their value, stay that way for a few years, then increase to double their original value.

Being better educated won't eliminate losses, it will hopefully reduce their frequency and magnitude.

#23 IamOzgirl

Posted 30 January 2020 - 07:25 PM

View Postbubskitkat, on 28 January 2020 - 09:34 PM, said:

I invested in minimal shares on Friday and today I have lost $100. Im not happy about that.

Thanks for the advice and tips.

I do need to become more educated before I loose another $100. I’m not a high risk type of person

Play with the fake money in the asx website.

https://www.asx.com....market-game.htm

Edited by IamOzgirl, 30 January 2020 - 07:26 PM.


#24 happygoluckyinoz

Posted 13 February 2020 - 05:55 PM

I listen to the Motley Food podcast, find they break it down into simple terms you can understand. I also have read the Barefoot book and I do work with and understand the concept of share investing.

We invest a set amount fortnightly for both us and our children with long term goals - we don't intend to sell so invest in index funds and EFT's. Some days we lose $500+ other days we make that back, it goes up and down and if that bothers you then share investing isn't for you.

Raiz and the Comsec pocket book app (I think it's called) are good starter products that can help you dip your toe in and become more confident.




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