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Help with pavers around pool please!


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13 replies to this topic

#1 gilchrist

Posted 05 February 2020 - 05:05 PM

Hi everyone, we are renovating our 70s pebblecrete pool and are currently trying to decide between natural stone or porcelain/ ceramic pavers.  Both seem to have many pros/ cons and we are completely confused.
We have found a porcelain tile that we love but are worried about the fact that porcelain holds heat as our pool is in full sun - no point in the pool surrounds looking good if we can't walk on the tiles!
We are not particularly interested in travertine (we have a mid-century house and travertine would be too 'rustic' looking in this application) and so were thinking about honed (ie. obviously not polished!) marble.  Does anyone have any experience with marble around pools?  Our main concern is staining.
Any advice would be much appreciated.

Edited by gilchrist, 05 February 2020 - 05:14 PM.


#2 Anonforthistime

Posted 05 February 2020 - 05:13 PM

Porcelain and marble sounds very slippery.
We have granite pavers which are ok to walk on in the heat, but it does involve a bit of an “ouch these pavers are hot” dancing.
IME, most pool surrounding gets hot underfoot, no matter what the manufacturers say.

#3 Bethlehem Babe

Posted 05 February 2020 - 05:31 PM

We are replacing our concrete pavers. They are extremely hot to walk on.

I will follow with interest.

#4 creatamum

Posted 05 February 2020 - 05:45 PM

Friends ended up going with Timbercrete pavers for the same problem so I do not have much info but they were defiently cooler to walk on compared to the all concrete path leading to the pool area.

#5 Kiwi Bicycle

Posted 05 February 2020 - 05:50 PM

FYI my modwood (fake long lasting timber stuff) decking gets hotter, faster than my timber decking.

#6 Ruf~Feral~es

Posted 05 February 2020 - 05:55 PM

We have a light coloured granite, which whilst it does get hot, is not as hot as our previous concrete and wooden decking.  The decking was unbearable.

Ultimately, when it is 36 degrees in full sun, anything other than grass is HOT.  But the (light grey) granite has been the best surface we've had.

#7 little lion

Posted 05 February 2020 - 07:44 PM

We have unfilled silver travertine. I don’t think it looks rustic (our house is contemporary) but that may depend on your colour choice and pattern it is laid in. Our pool is in full sun all morning and when we swim in the afternoons, after it has been heating up all day, the travertine isn’t hot.

The other one I liked was a limestone.

Edited to add that I chose travertine over the limestone because I liked the variability of the colours. I saw a neighbour’s pool with charcoal granite and cracks were very obvious because the stone was so uniform.

Edited by little lion, 05 February 2020 - 07:55 PM.


#8 Hands Up

Posted 05 February 2020 - 07:51 PM

Definitely not ceramic or porcelain. We had to replace our ceramic tiles on our deck as they would burn your feet in high summer. Natural stone all the way.

#9 3babygirls

Posted 05 February 2020 - 08:06 PM

I love our travertine, definitely don't think it looks 'rustic'.

It doesn't get hot at all (we have full sun all day) and it doesn't get slippery! My 3 year old runs around it like an idiot and has not slipped once.  Best pool surrounds that any of our family have had.

#10 Mumma bug

Posted 05 February 2020 - 09:27 PM

We got reconstituted sandstone pavers for our courtyard because they are cool underfoot. Now doing a pool and we want to do the same.

https://maisondesign.../pavers-coping/

#11 can'tstayaway

Posted 05 February 2020 - 09:45 PM

I’m another who doesn’t see travertine as ‘rustic’ per se. It can look different depending on tile size and lay pattern.

It is popular around pools because it’s cool underfoot. It’s a type of limestone and because of the low iron content, it doesn’t heat up unlike other stones like sandstone.

#12 gilchrist

Posted 06 February 2020 - 12:34 PM

Thank you for your responses everyone.
We have a couple of large marble samples and are leaving them in the sun and throwing water on them and basically doing whatever we can to narrow down our options.

Edited by gilchrist, 06 February 2020 - 12:35 PM.


#13 gilchrist

Posted 06 February 2020 - 12:35 PM

 Hands Up, on 05 February 2020 - 07:51 PM, said:

Definitely not ceramic or porcelain. We had to replace our ceramic tiles on our deck as they would burn your feet in high summer. Natural stone all the way.

Hands Up, can I ask which stone you replaced the ceramic with?

#14 can'tstayaway

Posted 06 February 2020 - 04:34 PM

 gilchrist, on 06 February 2020 - 12:34 PM, said:

Thank you for your responses everyone.
We have a couple of large marble samples and are leaving them in the sun and throwing water on them and basically doing whatever we can to narrow down our options.
Marble and travertine are both a type of limestone. The qualities of travertine makes it more suitable around a pool than marble.

Travertine is porous so the salts and stuff around a pool can ‘move’ through the stone without damaging it. Marble tends to get sealed when used around a pool because the pool chemicals can eat away at the stone. The sealant makes the stone slippery which isn’t good around a pool. You also want the whole tile dipped in the sealant instead of just one side sealed and then the salts get trapped.

I believe marble is also softer so wears away sooner in the high use areas. Not a problem if you like that rustic, worn look.




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