Jump to content

When a tree falls on powerlines....


  • Please log in to reply
45 replies to this topic

#1 purpleduck

Posted 09 February 2020 - 10:47 AM

How long does it usually take to restore power?

I’m thinking a good week with the current storm in Sydney??

#2 chillipeppers

Posted 09 February 2020 - 10:51 AM

If you call them out they should come out straight away and start working on it

#3 lizzzard

Posted 09 February 2020 - 10:57 AM

View Postchillipeppers, on 09 February 2020 - 10:51 AM, said:

If you call them out they should come out straight away and start working on it
Sure, under 'normal' circumstances....but when 500 other people are all ringing up asking to have 'someone come out straight away'.....I'm pretty sure some will have to wait ;)

I'd think it could be a few days- hopefully less than a week.

Please stay safe OP.

#4 *Spikey*

Posted 09 February 2020 - 11:05 AM

Based on the last big Sydney storm, I'd say 48 hours or so, max.

#5 purpleduck

Posted 09 February 2020 - 11:08 AM

We are fine. It was across the road at the neighbours.

I’ve taken a pic of the fridge contents, appreciated the fact that we have recently bought a 2 burner camping stove, and am so grateful it didn’t take out any houses.

Just thinking about logistics of no power for a few days. At least weather forecast is mild this week.

#6 purpleduck

Posted 09 February 2020 - 11:11 AM

View Post*Spikey*, on 09 February 2020 - 11:05 AM, said:

Based on the last big Sydney storm, I'd say 48 hours or so, max.

Oh that would be doable!! I think it’s still due for a fair amount of rain this week. That would cause more safety issues and delays, no?

Edited by purpleduck, 09 February 2020 - 11:13 AM.


#7 MarciaB

Posted 09 February 2020 - 11:15 AM

It took about 72 hours for us as the tree had to be removed and the SES was overloaded. They disconnected it right away for safety.

We were lucky enough to be able to run extension leads ( one neighbour is an electrician so he loaned us safe ones) from either side neighbours to run the fridge and for minor usage ( one lamp at night etc). Internet was biggest drama as my kids were doing exams. They studied at local library and used 4g.

#8 *Spikey*

Posted 09 February 2020 - 11:59 AM

Yep. My Sister and her crew had a long blackout yesterday - power was on again sometime during the night - and back off again late this morning.

BBQs are good tools for this - you can boil water and cook on them, so cover off the basics.

We have camping year that would also be useful - and a stock of battery powered lanterns, just in case.

#9 Coffeegirl

Posted 09 February 2020 - 12:36 PM

View Post*Spikey*, on 09 February 2020 - 11:05 AM, said:

Based on the last big Sydney storm, I'd say 48 hours or so, max.
Parts of our south suburb were out for 4 days after that storm last month.

#10 Leslie Knope

Posted 09 February 2020 - 01:49 PM

It depends on where you are and how bad your area is. I am on the Central Coast NSW and we have trees and powerlines down all over the place. There are a lot of suburbs here without power.

The last time it was like this, it took 6 days for our power to come back on and for the fallen power line in our street to be fixed.

#11 purpleduck

Posted 09 February 2020 - 02:14 PM

I finally managed to log a call with Ausgrid. No one has shown up since it happened and there are outages all through Sydney so guessing it is all being triaged.

Biggest thing I am not looking forward to is showering :( we can manage everything else, eat down and cook the food etc on the camp stove but the showering will be sponge baths I guess from what water we can heat or cold showers. Plus it’s that time of the month for two us at the moment :(

#12 *Spikey*

Posted 09 February 2020 - 02:21 PM

Oh that is not nice.

Fingers crossed they will get to you guys - or that someone in your area has already logged the problem and you're not too far back in the fix it queue.

#13 kimasa

Posted 09 February 2020 - 02:37 PM

When we lived in the Dandenongs in Melbourne we were without for 4 days once. Hopefully it doesn't take that long for you guys.

#14 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 09 February 2020 - 02:39 PM

View Postpurpleduck, on 09 February 2020 - 02:14 PM, said:

I finally managed to log a call with Ausgrid. No one has shown up since it happened and there are outages all through Sydney so guessing it is all being triaged.

Biggest thing I am not looking forward to is showering :( we can manage everything else, eat down and cook the food etc on the camp stove but the showering will be sponge baths I guess from what water we can heat or cold showers. Plus it’s that time of the month for two us at the moment :(

If your stove is gas then you can boil a big pot of water and then stand in the bath and pour it over your nether regions. Or just give up completely and go and stay with friends!

#15 Mumsyto2

Posted 09 February 2020 - 03:23 PM

I’m in Sydney. Last time we had a ripper, the police came out and cordoned off the areas around the live wires that were down and waited until the electricity people came to cap them off (think that’s what it was called). So the wires were still down but safe. Police were everywhere in our area.

There was even a police car stuck on our road several houses down. While they were out minding the wire that had come down more trees fell, enormous trees. Houses were destroyed, cars on the roads smashed, cars in garages smashed. Some massive trees fell across the road blocking both exits in and out so the police car was trapped there for a few days but at least did not get smashed by any further falling trees.

We were trapped in our street for 3 days until SES could clear the trees on the road, and they were working around the clock as we were sitting there awake at 2am with floodlights and chainsaws going out the front of our house in the street. They didn’t fix the wiring to restore power for 5 days and we had no mobile service for 4 days, neither did anyone else so we guessed a tower had been taken out? This is all in metropolitan Sydney! It was okay though as on the 4th day we could leave the street and have phone access elsewhere.

It wasn’t really a problem as we have gas stove so could boil water. Also the SES came round on day 2 delivering sausages and bread, they expected everyone had BBQ’s I guess. In those conditions 4 days without a shower was the least of the worries. It was also school hols so a bit like a camping adventure in your own home really. The police and SES also did some sort of evac for people with young babies who needed power/boiling water for bottles etc and very elderly or anyone with medical needs that couldn’t stay in that situation. Still not sure how they got them out as we couldn’t physically walk out of our street, maybe in cherry pickers? I also heard they had a series of golf cart things to get people to minibus pick up points and then they were taken to community hall that had generators going.

#16 *Spikey*

Posted 09 February 2020 - 04:47 PM

Let me just say that I am grateful that our powerlines are underground....

#17 got my tinsel on

Posted 09 February 2020 - 05:17 PM

Power in my area was out for 6 hours this afternoon.  Just after the power went out, we heard sirens so thought it may have been a tree down over lines or someone has run into a power pole (not unusual here in Hoonville).  I don't know that it was either of these issues though.

All in all, 6 hours wasn't too bad as the power company's text messages thought it would have been a lot longer.

#18 Mumsyto2

Posted 09 February 2020 - 05:26 PM

View Post*Spikey*, on 09 February 2020 - 04:47 PM, said:

Let me just say that I am grateful that our powerlines are underground....

God, that would be bliss. I believe all the new far flung suburbs in Sydney have this as standard as they are developed but any established Sydney suburbs are stuck with it.

Same as all the new suburbs seem to have those sloping kerbs you can drive up and park partially on the grass strip to enable more room for traffic to pass on the roads but the established suburbs have the old fashioned 90 degree angle kerbs.

#19 born.a.girl

Posted 09 February 2020 - 05:51 PM

View PostMumsyto2, on 09 February 2020 - 05:26 PM, said:

God, that would be bliss. I believe all the new far flung suburbs in Sydney have this as standard as they are developed but any established Sydney suburbs are stuck with it.

Same as all the new suburbs seem to have those sloping kerbs you can drive up and park partially on the grass strip to enable more room for traffic to pass on the roads but the established suburbs have the old fashioned 90 degree angle kerbs.


I'm in a very old established suburb in melbourne.  new houses around here have the power underground.  It seems to be a pit for every two houses, the one for the new house next door is exactly 50/50 either side of the fence line.

Same with a another new house four doors up - pit seems to be designed to eventually cover two houses.

#20 born.a.girl

Posted 09 February 2020 - 05:54 PM

View Postpurpleduck, on 09 February 2020 - 02:14 PM, said:

I finally managed to log a call with Ausgrid. No one has shown up since it happened and there are outages all through Sydney so guessing it is all being triaged.

Biggest thing I am not looking forward to is showering Posted Image we can manage everything else, eat down and cook the food etc on the camp stove but the showering will be sponge baths I guess from what water we can heat or cold showers. Plus it’s that time of the month for two us at the moment Posted Image


If you've got a camp stove, heat water on that, then have one person above you (stepladder?  We had the loo) slowly pouring the water on to you.

This is what we had to do when we had two weeks in Melbourne without gas after an explosion in 1998, although we were using electric kettles.  

You get pretty damned smart at washing yourself in either a trickle or a deluge of not-quite-warm-enough or  just-a-tad-hot water.

#21 got my tinsel on

Posted 09 February 2020 - 06:03 PM

I'm in a suburb with power lines.

The best that was on offer when we did a knock down rebuild 13 years ago was to have a private pole erected in the front corner of the yard, with underground power from that to the house.

The dirty big tree growing on the nature strip that is on a good 30 degree lean towards the street is a worry though. If it falls, it will easily take out the power lines on the other side of the street.

#22 *Spikey*

Posted 09 February 2020 - 06:16 PM

Yes, its is a great thing to be in the 'new' part of town, lol. Underground everything. The best part was that they used Fibre to the home for all of the telco stuff - figuring it was going to last better and be easier to maintain than copper. Though we did have an ancient copper-wired based  exchange. A year after we moved in, the old exchange got a direct hit by lightning and melted. Two weeks later, nice new exchange with the latest fibre technology.

So we have okay internet and landline, unlike a lot of the older homes. And we are uphill from the creek. If it does eventually rain, our house should be fine, even if we cannot get out of the estate to get to work and school.

Edited by *Spikey*, 09 February 2020 - 06:16 PM.


#23 laridae

Posted 09 February 2020 - 06:40 PM

View Postpurpleduck, on 09 February 2020 - 02:14 PM, said:

Biggest thing I am not looking forward to is showering :( we can manage everything else, eat down and cook the food etc on the camp stove but the showering will be sponge baths I guess from what water we can heat or cold showers. Plus it’s that time of the month for two us at the moment :(
We were without hot water for about 2 weeks once (not a power outage - our hot water cylinder blew and we had to wait for the new one to be installed).
Luckily there are showers at both mine and DH's work so we just showered there. The kids showered at the pool after swimming lessons (and we could have gone at other times due to them having free entry for swim school members). I did have a few cold showers too (and this was winter in Tas), they weren't that bad.
You could get a camp shower if you think it's going to be a while, or just heat some water and do a quick wash.

Edited by laridae, 09 February 2020 - 06:41 PM.


#24 kimasa

Posted 09 February 2020 - 06:46 PM

View PostMumsyto2, on 09 February 2020 - 05:26 PM, said:



God, that would be bliss. I believe all the new far flung suburbs in Sydney have this as standard as they are developed but any established Sydney suburbs are stuck with it.

Same as all the new suburbs seem to have those sloping kerbs you can drive up and park partially on the grass strip to enable more room for traffic to pass on the roads but the established suburbs have the old fashioned 90 degree angle kerbs.

We're in a new area and it's wonderful. All our street lights are solar too, there's little panels every couple of lights. Took me ages to figure out what they were.

#25 Jingleflea

Posted 09 February 2020 - 07:11 PM

I'm in the southern part of Canberra and I love our underground services.

in 22 years or so, we've had 2 blackouts and one of those was from sh*t kids kicking at the little node thing at the bottom of the street.

Our NBN though is to the node, the street behind us has it to the curb. So unfair!




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.