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Hairdressing as a career?


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#1 butterfli

Posted 13 February 2020 - 01:58 PM

My DD is in grade 10 at school, she's doing cert 2 salon assistant as a subect. What do you guys think of hairdressing as a career? If there are any hairdressers on here, do you reccomend hairdressing as a career? I'm just trying to get a smuch info as I can so that when she has some questions, I might, hopefully have some answers!

TIA

#2 avocado toast

Posted 13 February 2020 - 02:56 PM

I wouldn’t... I have a friend who is one and you make no money unless you own your own salon. Plus you have to work nights and weekends on your feet all day exposed to chemicals.  My friend bought her own salon and now she works non stop to make decent money. She hates it!

#3 Kiwi Bicycle

Posted 13 February 2020 - 03:07 PM

Not a hairdresser but my cousin is a beautician. Orginally she had her own business  as a sole trader but it didn't make money and she got burnt out not being able to take holidays or being sick. She now works at a salon is much happier. She's won some awards in the industry and  her boss treats her good to keep her. She has just pirchased her first house with her partner at 42, but often travels and has 2 fur babies. She also has been able to travel and work ( at a ski field for  a season).

#4 Cimbom

Posted 13 February 2020 - 05:03 PM

Like avocado toast, the people I know find the pay aspect disappointing

#5 Flaxen

Posted 13 February 2020 - 05:17 PM

As above, my hairdresser works from a fully converted room at her home.
She had worked in a salon but made peanuts and had enough of the culture, and now working for herself she has recently appointed another hairdresser on staff and an apprentice too.

I would see if her interests in other areas could be explored, but if it's really what she wants to do, go ahead with eyes wide open.

#6 Elizabethandfriend

Posted 13 February 2020 - 05:41 PM

Its physically demanding as well - okay when you are young but I feel for older hairdressers who are on their feet all day.

#7 Moo-me

Posted 13 February 2020 - 07:09 PM

One positive though is you have skill that you can work from home with your own clients and make money on the side. My hair dresser works exclusive from home. I wish I had a skill I could utilise like that to make extra cash on the side.

There are other things you can do with a hair qualification, like an educator for a hair company a quick search on seek - https://www.seek.com...3c-e7c11c3a9378 or https://www.seek.com...3c-e7c11c3a9378


#8 Silver Girl

Posted 13 February 2020 - 07:14 PM

Something to keep in mind is occupational injuries, like ganglion cysts on the wrists, dermatitis etc.

Does she like talking to people? Many hairdressers seem to spend a lot of time chatting to clients and each other while they work. Would this be an aspect your DD would enjoy?

#9 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 13 February 2020 - 10:41 PM

My cousin was a hair dresser. Did it for 12/13 years maybe?
She enjoyed the clients and quite liked doing hair, but it was hard physically (standing all day - she now has quite serious varicose veins which can be painful + the chemical contact) and she was completely over working on weekends.late nights. She gets better pay with better hours in her current job.

My hairdresser rents a chair in a salon. Salon has 4 of their own hairdressers and rents out 4 chairs to independent hairdressers, who share the chairs, if that makes sense. At the moment, she works 3 days and 1 night (that salon is open 4 nights a week - Mon-Thurs). My hairdresser likes it because she sets her own fees, her own hours, etc.

#10 lozoodle

Posted 14 February 2020 - 07:48 AM

Couldn't imagine anything worse, physically draining work for sh*t pay!

#11 Bigbaubles

Posted 14 February 2020 - 08:15 AM

My husbands workmate built his wife a studio at home, spent like $20K+ to do so, wife worked in it for like 2 months and then decided she hates hairdressing... :o

She could so some work in a hairdressing studio and see if she likes it before considering it further? I had a couple of students who used to work in salons sweeping up hair and doing odd jobs etc.

#12 Oriental lily

Posted 14 February 2020 - 08:24 AM

Sounds like being a florist lol !

#13 klr75

Posted 14 February 2020 - 09:21 AM

If my child was passionate about a career path, then I would encourage them to go for it!  

We all need good hairdressers, the money might not be the best, but hey money is not everything!  I've worked in a job that I hated for years, and there is nothing worse - I took a pay cut and loving life so much better!

#14 Mose

Posted 14 February 2020 - 09:44 AM

 klr75, on 14 February 2020 - 09:21 AM, said:

If my child was passionate about a career path, then I would encourage them to go for it!  

We all need good hairdressers, the money might not be the best, but hey money is not everything!  I've worked in a job that I hated for years, and there is nothing worse - I took a pay cut and loving life so much better!

I agree with this, but also think if your child is interested in discussing it with you, that you have some thoughts on the good bits and the bad bits, which is what I think OP was looking for?

I work in a job I love, well paid,  flexible, the one I qualified for straight out of school.  I don't have regrets, but if I was talking to someone about joining my profession I would have both good and bad things they might want to think about.

To some extent, I wish someone had that conversation with me.  It might not have changed my choices, but it would have made them more informed.  As it is, I think I set out to do what I do with very little understanding of what the day to day reality would be like.

It's hard to have that conversation, and also come across as completely supportive, but if it can be done that would be most excellent!!

#15 seayork2002

Posted 14 February 2020 - 09:46 AM

 klr75, on 14 February 2020 - 09:21 AM, said:

If my child was passionate about a career path, then I would encourage them to go for it!  

We all need good hairdressers, the money might not be the best, but hey money is not everything!  I've worked in a job that I hated for years, and there is nothing worse - I took a pay cut and loving life so much better!

This!

#16 Chchgirl

Posted 14 February 2020 - 09:48 AM

My oldest dd (21) wanted to do it, my friend who owns a salon got her to do work experience there and encouraged her to work part time there in year 10 to see if she likes it.

She chose not to at the end of the day as she's not really a people person but I do know hairdressers who also love it.

She did animal studies at tafe after year 12 as this is her passion. Only got a job in it last year as jobs are few and far between (after years of different jobs). It's definitely not well paid but she loves it.

If she had wanted to do hairdressing I would have supported that. Not everyone is suited to uni and not everyone will be paid enormously.

Edited by Chchgirl, 14 February 2020 - 09:49 AM.


#17 butterfli

Posted 14 February 2020 - 09:54 AM

Thank you all for your opinions!

I am very blessed that my does share things with me and ask for my input! I will bring up the whole being on your feet all day with her!

#18 butterfli

Posted 14 February 2020 - 09:56 AM

 Chchgirl, on 14 February 2020 - 09:48 AM, said:

Not everyone is suited to uni and not everyone will be paid enormously.

I don't think my DD is suited to uni, she doesn't thrive on study!!!

#19 fraidycat

Posted 14 February 2020 - 09:59 AM

I did a carpentry apprenticeship...best thing ever... in late 30's and OWN 2 of my three houses.  Married another tradie as well.  Heaps of options post trade...you can teach you can start your own business... suggest looking at a trade.

#20 Babetty

Posted 14 February 2020 - 11:34 AM

 butterfli, on 14 February 2020 - 09:56 AM, said:



I don't think my DD is suited to uni, she doesn't thrive on study!!!

If she decides on hairdressing - or any sort of trade which often leads to running your own business - (and assuming she's still at high school now) encourage her to do subjects like accounting, legal studies etc at school, as having some basic knowledge of accounting, legal principles (contacts and employment especially etc) is really useful if she ends up owning her own salon.

#21 Meepy

Posted 14 February 2020 - 11:35 AM

And business management as it helps with staffing and running a business.  VET Business is another option.

#22 Ellie bean

Posted 14 February 2020 - 03:16 PM

My husband is a hairdresser, he is very good at it and loves it, it has worked well for us as he is able to work part time from home (home salon) and do school drop offs and pick ups etc. the pay is really not great, luckily for us I’m the main income earner but when hairdressing is compared to other(traditionally male) jobs with similar levels of training, yes the pay is not good at all. you do have to like chatting to people too (luckily DH likes that).

#23 Ellie bean

Posted 14 February 2020 - 03:18 PM

I should add, I do always keep in mind that my specialised better paid profession could be legislated away in a heartbeat, whereas people are always going to need hairdressers no matter what, it’s one of those kind of future proofed jobs which is an advantage

Edited by Ellie bean, 14 February 2020 - 03:18 PM.


#24 Luci

Posted 14 February 2020 - 03:27 PM

My hairdresser rents a chair in a salon. He works 4 days - Tuesday to Friday, I think that includes one or two later nights until about 8.30pm. It is in an upmarket part of Sydney and he earns quite good money, much more than he would as an employee in a salon and he has flexibility with his days and hours.  

He would be in his mid 40’s and did the hard yards first working for many years as a salon employee.

He is also a very talented hair stylist with a loyal clientele and he is a lovely friendly chatty guy so well suited to it.

He also has had a lot of problems with varicose veins in his legs.

#25 Ozquoll

Posted 14 February 2020 - 03:38 PM

View PostMoo-me, on 13 February 2020 - 07:09 PM, said:

One positive though is you have skill that you can work from home with your own clients and make money on the side. My hair dresser works exclusive from home. I wish I had a skill I could utilise like that to make extra cash on the side.
My hairdresser works mostly from home, and just does an occasional shift at a salon as a favour to her friend who owns it. She is a top-notch hairdresser and used to work in a very pricey salon. Thankfully nowadays she can charge me a much lower rate because she works from home 🙏!

She absolutely loves being a hairdresser, and the working from home aspect has made it easy to fit her career around having three kids. She also teams up with a make-up artist mate of hers and they do the hair and makeup for brides at weddings, which pays well. I'd say if your daughter is sociable, tactful and creative she will probably love hairdressing.




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