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Leaving an 8 year old in a cool car?


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#26 Ollie83

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:00 PM

View PostLou-bags, on 18 February 2020 - 01:30 PM, said:

In your situation, with an unwell child who I'd rather not bring in, I'd consider calling the school and asking if someone could walk my younger child to the school gate for me to collect.

Admittedly our school is very small, but our amazing school admin woman would definitely do this, or would have someone else do it for us.

It's safer for everyone. That way you aren't leaving anyone unattended, and you also aren't exposing anyone else at the school to whatever illness your unwell child has.

This is a great option. Pretty sure it’s against the law to leave a child this young in a car alone still?

#27 robhat

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:13 PM

Under similar circumstances I have opted to leave the sick child at home, in bed, with the phone next to them making sure they knew how to call me and their father and with instructions to stay in bed (unless going to the toilet) and not to answer the door.

I admittedly wouldn't do this if I was going to be gone for more than 30 minutes.

#28 amdirel

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:17 PM

Depends what you mean by "it's not hot". I spend a lot of time in my car sitting around waiting for kids to finish activities, and it's suprising how hot it can get in a car, even on a mild, overcast day.

Also, in NSW at least the law is a very vague something about a child being at risk of distress. Which you could argue that a feverish 8yo could get in distress, so you could potentially be penalised if police were around.

Edited by amdirel, 18 February 2020 - 03:18 PM.


#29 JomoMum

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:19 PM

Not outside a school no. They will have strict rules about leaving kids in cars regardless of the temperature. Child safety and all.
It would only take one person to see the child and complain.

Edited by JomoMum, 18 February 2020 - 03:20 PM.


#30 spr_maiden

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:21 PM

View PostOllie83, on 18 February 2020 - 03:00 PM, said:



This is a great option. Pretty sure it’s against the law to leave a child this young in a car alone still?

It's not against the law to leave a child as has been discussed here.

Our school staff would not walk a child out of the school grounds to deliver to a parent. Not because they're not good people, but because it's not really their place to do so.

#31 Lou-bags

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:21 PM

View PostOllie83, on 18 February 2020 - 03:00 PM, said:

This is a great option. Pretty sure it’s against the law to leave a child this young in a car alone still?

I believe the law in most states is open to interpretation somewhat. For example here in WA the wording (and I think this is up to date but I am happy to be corrected) is:

“an offence to leave children unsupervised in a vehicle where they are likely to suffer emotional distress or temporary or permanent injury to health.”

And then of course there is ambiguity about the term 'unsupervised'.

At our local bakery, I can park right outside the door and be less than a few metres from my car at all times, with the car never out of my sight. Is that unsupervised? (Haven't managed to leave them in the car there anyway, they insist on coming in, because how would they nag me for doughnuts and cookies from the car?).


Same with the service station- where you can see them the whole time. I don't think that's unsupervised necessarily. I would argue it's safer to leave the child/ren in the car very briefly vs navigate them through a servo with cars coming and going.

Edited by Lou-bags, 18 February 2020 - 03:24 PM.


#32 Lou-bags

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:22 PM

somehow accidentally quoted myself... soz- deleted

Edited by Lou-bags, 18 February 2020 - 03:23 PM.


#33 TheGreenSheep

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:25 PM

I would and have left them home to do a 5 minute pick up.

#34 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:27 PM

I did wonder how long it would take for the law to be brought up...

#35 Jingleflea

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:28 PM

I'd message a school mum friend and get them to walk the school child out to the car, which I'm sitting in with the sick child.

That's only if the younger kid doesn't need a parent to be sighted before the teacher will release them.

#36 Dadto2

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:36 PM

If you'e going to leave a child in a car with the keys in the ignition and engine running, maybe teach them to drive, cos you can bet your bottom dollar they will play with the gear stick at some point!

#37 spr_maiden

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:40 PM

Well, to be fair,  I park on hills so they can just roll down into oncoming traffic for their thrills.

#38 Let-it-go

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:47 PM

I would either have a friend drop them home or leave sick child at home.  No, I wouldn’t leave in car.....not because I care or worry, I couldn’t care less but I’d assume someone would report me.

#39 (feral)epg

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:48 PM

Surely by the age of 8 a kid can identify that they are feeling some heat stress and negotiate a door handle to get out of the car it it's too hot.

#40 born.a.girl

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:48 PM

View PostOllie83, on 18 February 2020 - 03:00 PM, said:

This is a great option. Pretty sure it’s against the law to leave a child this young in a car alone still?

I don't think it's a blanket rule, otherwise they'd arrest every person taking the supermarket trolley back.

Found this:

Quote

A person who, having the lawful care or charge of a child under 12 years, leaves the child for an unreasonable time without making reasonable provision for the supervision and care of the child during that time commits a misdemeanour.


#41 born.a.girl

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:52 PM

View PostLet-it-go, on 18 February 2020 - 03:47 PM, said:

I would either have a friend drop them home or leave sick child at home.  No, I wouldn’t leave in car.....not because I care or worry, I couldn’t care less but I’d assume someone would report me.


I understand your concern, but isn't it sad that someone would report an 8 year old sitting perfectly comfortably in a car?

The biggest issue with leaving babies and toddlers in cars is that they can't get out.

I wouldn't leave an eight year old on a hot day, same reason I wouldn't leave anyone on a hot day. An adult I could leave the car running.


Any idiot who'd ring emergency services rather than just check that the kid was o.k. is a serious waster of the their time.

#42 luke's mummu

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:52 PM

I’d never leave the engine running- only takes a kid to climb into the front, knock the handbrake off and into drive/ neutral and they’re off. Actually about 20 years ago a grandparent left a child in a car ( must have had the car keys in the ignition) who tried to “ kangaroo hop” a manual car and it moved and crushed a school child to death. There is a memorial to her at a local school

#43 lozoodle

Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:53 PM

Yep of course. They're old enough to get out. No issue from me. Depends on the area you live I guess but my kid would be ok with that.

#44 #notallcats

Posted 18 February 2020 - 04:11 PM

Yeah I'd be reluctant to leave the car on.  There have been a few cases of a car thief taking off with the kid in the back.  I know it's a very small chance, but I'd be too nervous with that scenario.

#45 RichardParker

Posted 18 February 2020 - 04:29 PM

I'd do it - just depends on how far away you have to park, how long it takes to do the pick up, whether the kid is pretty chilled and will wait without getting panicked or start playing with gear sticks, etc.

I wouldn't leave the car running - I'd wind the windows down and duck in for the pick-up.

But probs the best is to message another Mum (or I'd yell out the window) to bring your kid out to you along with theirs.

#46 BadCat

Posted 18 February 2020 - 04:42 PM

I'd do it without even thinking twice.

#47 EsmeLennox

Posted 18 February 2020 - 04:44 PM

I’d do it, it’s fine in my view. I wouldn’t even lock the car.

Alternatively, if the pick up was brief and I’d be gone 30 mins or less, I’d leave them at home, providing they were happy with that arrangement.

The kid’s 8 years old...not 8 months old.

#48 Magratte

Posted 18 February 2020 - 05:03 PM

View Postrobhat, on 18 February 2020 - 03:13 PM, said:

Under similar circumstances I have opted to leave the sick child at home, in bed, with the phone next to them making sure they knew how to call me and their father and with instructions to stay in bed (unless going to the toilet) and not to answer the door.

I admittedly wouldn't do this if I was going to be gone for more than 30 minutes.

Same, I’d consider this the best option. It would take me under 20 minutes both way. Said child had a phone in their hands and instructions not to open the door.

The first time I did that we talked on the phone the entire time do I knew what was happening.

#49 Soontobegran

Posted 18 February 2020 - 05:05 PM

8 years ?
Without a second thought.

On a very hot day I would try and park in the shade and leave all windows open and be as quick as I could be.

#50 CallMeFeral

Posted 18 February 2020 - 05:16 PM

Hell yes.

The only reason I wouldn't would be if I thought someone 'helpful' might report me, but for any commonsense purpose they should be fine. In some countries an 8yo would be supporting their family and caring for babies, they are not infants.




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