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Leaving an 8 year old in a cool car?


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#51 MadMarchMasterchef

Posted 18 February 2020 - 05:27 PM

View PostLou-bags, on 18 February 2020 - 01:30 PM, said:

In your situation, with an unwell child who I'd rather not bring in, I'd consider calling the school and asking if someone could walk my younger child to the school gate for me to collect.

Admittedly our school is very small, but our amazing school admin woman would definitely do this, or would have someone else do it for us.

It's safer for everyone. That way you aren't leaving anyone unattended, and you also aren't exposing anyone else at the school to whatever illness your unwell child has.

Our school would do this but it would be impossible to get a park unless you came over an hour early, and Im not exaggurating at all! :no2:

#52 Zeppelina

Posted 18 February 2020 - 05:30 PM

View PostDadto2, on 18 February 2020 - 03:36 PM, said:

If you'e going to leave a child in a car with the keys in the ignition and engine running, maybe teach them to drive, cos you can bet your bottom dollar they will play with the gear stick at some point!
Not All Kids - there is no way in hell my 8yo DS would go anywhere near the front seat, the gearstick, or any part of the car he knows he shouldn't touch. (My DD on the other hand...)

OP I would and I have done the above, only it was going to the chemist (to get medicine for said sick child). My only concern was that someone would report it. He's old enough to open the door and get out if necessary. I was only in the chemist for maximum 10 minutes, and it was close to the car so I could stick my head out and check on him once or twice.

Our general rule is "If there's a danger inside the car (like getting too hot), get out. If there's a danger outside the car, stay in."

#53 SkeptiHandsOnMum

Posted 18 February 2020 - 05:33 PM

For all worrying about it being reported, why does that worry you? If someone actually did do that, what do you think is then going to happen?

View Postjayskette, on 18 February 2020 - 01:34 PM, said:

surely an 8 year old will be old enough to go to the sick bay or sit outside the car
Huh? Why make a sick child sit outside the car? I am not sure that the sick bay would be the place if they have not been at school for the day - I would say that it falls outside of their scope.

#54 Luci

Posted 18 February 2020 - 05:50 PM

I would potentially do it. If the child was happy to wait in the car, I was able to find a shady spot and I was only going to be a couple of minutes.  As mentioned by PP’s it would not be illegal in NSW.

I would leave all 4 windows down a bit and definitely only do it if it wasn’t hot.

#55 spr_maiden

Posted 18 February 2020 - 05:51 PM

^^^ the bonus of a child who can be rigid in following rules is that the likelihood of them going into the front seat etc is very slim.

Edited by spr_maiden, 18 February 2020 - 05:51 PM.


#56 robhat

Posted 18 February 2020 - 06:19 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 18 February 2020 - 03:48 PM, said:

I don't think it's a blanket rule, otherwise they'd arrest every person taking the supermarket trolley back.

Found this:

I actually got harassed once by the security people in an underground car park because I left my kid strapped in and with the door open while I returned my trolley to the bay that was 10 cars away...

#57 Pip_longstockings

Posted 18 February 2020 - 06:19 PM

I would happily leave at home or in the car.

I do live in a very contained residential area where everyone seems to know everyone.

And my 8yo looks about 11 so I doubt anyone would call the police.

#58 amdirel

Posted 18 February 2020 - 06:30 PM

View PostLuci, on 18 February 2020 - 05:50 PM, said:

I would potentially do it. If the child was happy to wait in the car, I was able to find a shady spot and I was only going to be a couple of minutes.  As mentioned by PP’s it would not be illegal in NSW.

I would leave all 4 windows down a bit and definitely only do it if it wasn’t hot.

It could be illegal in NSW. Depends on the cop at the time.

#59 TheirMum2

Posted 18 February 2020 - 06:55 PM

In addition to concerns that someone might call the police, consideration also needs to be given to the fact that school staff are madatory reporters and that many school staff might see this as reportable to FaCS. This could also be the case if you left the 8 year old at home.

I would try to get a staff member to walk the little one to the gate or organise another parent to collect and walk to the car (letting the school know that this has been organised in advance).

It is also not only about trusting your 8 year old (who is probably very responsible), but an 8 year old in a car on their own is very vulnerable to others.

#60 Kaz83

Posted 18 February 2020 - 07:10 PM

View PostTheirMum2, on 18 February 2020 - 06:55 PM, said:

In addition to concerns that someone might call the police, consideration also needs to be given to the fact that school staff are madatory reporters and that many school staff might see this as reportable to FaCS. This could also be the case if you left the 8 year old at home.

I would try to get a staff member to walk the little one to the gate or organise another parent to collect and walk to the car (letting the school know that this has been organised in advance).

It is also not only about trusting your 8 year old (who is probably very responsible), but an 8 year old in a car on their own is very vulnerable to others.

Seriously?? I think FaCS have much more important things to follow up than an 8 yr old being left in a car for 5mins.

#61 born.a.girl

Posted 18 February 2020 - 07:15 PM

View PostTheirMum2, on 18 February 2020 - 06:55 PM, said:

In addition to concerns that someone might call the police, consideration also needs to be given to the fact that school staff are madatory reporters and that many school staff might see this as reportable to FaCS. This could also be the case if you left the 8 year old at home.

I would try to get a staff member to walk the little one to the gate or organise another parent to collect and walk to the car (letting the school know that this has been organised in advance).

It is also not only about trusting your 8 year old (who is probably very responsible), but an 8 year old in a car on their own is very vulnerable to others.

Seriously?

Some kids are walking home at that age.  In face some are walking home earlier than that.

I would seriously hope the reporter would have more to go on that an eight year old sitting comfortably in a car, outside a school, at pickup time.

In fact, as per another thread, I'm pretty sure they'd not even think of reporting - in isolation.

#62 EsmeLennox

Posted 18 February 2020 - 07:18 PM

View PostTheirMum2, on 18 February 2020 - 06:55 PM, said:

In addition to concerns that someone might call the police, consideration also needs to be given to the fact that school staff are madatory reporters and that many school staff might see this as reportable to FaCS. This could also be the case if you left the 8 year old at home.

I would try to get a staff member to walk the little one to the gate or organise another parent to collect and walk to the car (letting the school know that this has been organised in advance).

It is also not only about trusting your 8 year old (who is probably very responsible), but an 8 year old in a car on their own is very vulnerable to others.

I very much doubt that. School staff have bigger fish to fry than that one...

#63 spr_maiden

Posted 18 February 2020 - 07:26 PM

I am kinda surprised that people would ask a staff member to walk their child out to the car tbh.
Asking them to take a fyos or yr 1 child to the parent pick up zone,  I understand. Or them giving a message to child to wait in office if need be or to walk to gate, I understand.
But to request a teacher to bring your child to you feels like your making your problem, their problem.

Ed. Typo

Edited by spr_maiden, 18 February 2020 - 07:28 PM.


#64 PrincessPeach

Posted 18 February 2020 - 07:29 PM

For our school, if i couldnt get another mum to walk the kid to the gate, I'd ask for the younger one to be walked to the office & then stop in the drop & go zone, let the teacher on duty know the plan & run the 20m the office to pick up my kid.

#65 ekbaby

Posted 18 February 2020 - 07:31 PM

Yes I would totally do that with an 8 yo and have done lots of times.
I would wind down windows and take keys with me so they couldn’t start the car accidentally.
At my kids school I can’t imagine anyone caring.
We live in a regional area that is pretty safe (not known for car jacking!) and they would know lots of the ppl walking past. Sometimes parents offer to watch each other’s sleeping babies in the car (with windows down etc) whilst the other parent gets everyone’s kids.
My 8 and 11 yo often choose to stay in car even when not sick if given the choice at things like picking sister up from friends house.
Different story with my irresponsible 5yr old.

#66 CallMeFeral

Posted 18 February 2020 - 07:54 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 18 February 2020 - 07:15 PM, said:

Some kids are walking home at that age.  In face some are walking home earlier than that.

That's a good point.
It seems actually like a huge double standard in terms of legislation on say when kids can be left in cars, left alone at home - yet kids catch buses and walk home with an element of being unsupervised (and arguably more vulnerable than in some of the other options) and it's fine.

Not that I think it shouldn't be fine. But it's an anomaly akin to the one where people are told to boil bottles even after kids are eating and putting stuff on the floor into their mouths. It makes no sense.

#67 tothebeach

Posted 18 February 2020 - 08:12 PM

They are 8, not a baby.  At 8, they can just open the door or a window if they get too hot.  I wouldn’t leave the engine running but I wouldn’t spend one sec thinking about whether to leave them in the car.

At 9 my son was walking or cycling to and from school.

#68 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 18 February 2020 - 08:13 PM

View PostCallMeFeral, on 18 February 2020 - 07:54 PM, said:



That's a good point.
It seems actually like a huge double standard in terms of legislation on say when kids can be left in cars, left alone at home - yet kids catch buses and walk home with an element of being unsupervised (and arguably more vulnerable than in some of the other options) and it's fine.

Not that I think it shouldn't be fine. But it's an anomaly akin to the one where people are told to boil bottles even after kids are eating and putting stuff on the floor into their mouths. It makes no sense.

Last year DS was at kinder (pre school) I had to sign him in and out, and the place was akin to a prison, high fences, double doors, locked during sessions.

All of a sudden he starts school and I drop him at the gate and pick him up at any “safe spot” I feel like. I’ll probably let him walk home alone next year (we live 300m from the school gate)

It’s been a strange feeling considering DS is only a few months older than he was at kinder and he is one of the older kids.

#69 Soontobegran

Posted 18 February 2020 - 08:15 PM

View PostTheirMum2, on 18 February 2020 - 06:55 PM, said:

In addition to concerns that someone might call the police, consideration also needs to be given to the fact that school staff are madatory reporters and that many school staff might see this as reportable to FaCS. This could also be the case if you left the 8 year old at home.

I would try to get a staff member to walk the little one to the gate or organise another parent to collect and walk to the car (letting the school know that this has been organised in advance).

It is also not only about trusting your 8 year old (who is probably very responsible), but an 8 year old in a car on their own is very vulnerable to others.

Oh my goodness.
If one of the staff dared to use their mandatory reporting expectation to report the fact an 8 year old child was left in a cool car for a few minutes when there has never been any red flags for this child and family they should think seriously about their role.

The child is 8.........I have had 5 x 8 year old children, they were left in the car to read while I ducked into shops and when I ran into kinder to pick up a younger child.
Give the parent more credit to make good decisions for their children and give your children more credit.
You have to show them you trust them sometimes.

#70 Murderino

Posted 18 February 2020 - 08:43 PM

There are about thirty families at our rural school and if I’m there 15 minutes before pickup I can park at the front gate, if I arrive at pickup I’m 20 metres away! I would absolutely leave my 8yo if I had to go in and get his older sister as I know no-one would report that (I wouldn’t need to go in as I’d be parked within 5 metres of the gate and she’d see me).

If they weren’t feeling too bad by the afternoon they’d sit with me in the garden chatting to other parents.

I don’t leave them in the car anywhere else. In 2016 this press release came out in Vic
https://www.premier....e-kids-in-cars/

It says:

Quote

In Victoria, it is against the law to leave children unattended in a car. Parents or carers could face fines of nearly $3,700 or up to six months’ jail, or both.

The fine has increased now.

KidsafeVic (who the government worked with per the media release) has this and the picture says take your child (no age definition) even for a minute.
https://www.kidsafev...ed-in-car-laws/


There is no age defined and if you search it says each case will be assessed on reasonableness. I think my 10 and 8 year old would be fine in the car while I duck into the small town IGA, the school etc  but I’m not leaving it to a policeman (or court) to decide because someone reported me so I’ll just take them with me.


View PostDadto2, on 18 February 2020 - 03:36 PM, said:

If you'e going to leave a child in a car with the keys in the ignition and engine running, maybe teach them to drive, cos you can bet your bottom dollar they will play with the gear stick at some point!

A mum at our school had her youngest start the car - he was three.

Edited by Murderino, 18 February 2020 - 08:44 PM.


#71 Luci

Posted 18 February 2020 - 08:46 PM

View Postamdirel, on 18 February 2020 - 06:30 PM, said:



It could be illegal in NSW. Depends on the cop at the time.

Yes I agree that a police officer might decide they were not happy. But I have read the relevant section of legislation and I personally wouldn’t be too concerned about getting into trouble.  Ultimately it would be up to a judge to decide if the law had been broken, not a police office. l understand of course that other people might feel differently and decide not to leave the child out of fear of getting into trouble.

Edited by Luci, 18 February 2020 - 08:50 PM.


#72 Lou-bags

Posted 18 February 2020 - 08:57 PM

View Postspr_maiden, on 18 February 2020 - 07:26 PM, said:

I am kinda surprised that people would ask a staff member to walk their child out to the car tbh.
Asking them to take a fyos or yr 1 child to the parent pick up zone,  I understand. Or them giving a message to child to wait in office if need be or to walk to gate, I understand.
But to request a teacher to bring your child to you feels like your making your problem, their problem.

Ed. Typo

Who said theyd ask for their child to be brought to the car?

We don’t have a parent pick up zone. I said in my post If ask them to bring my kid to the gate (though now he’s year one id ask them to ask him to walk there himself). I’d be able to stand by my car and see the gate or vice versa.

Definitely wouldn’t expect them to walk the kid out to the car.

#73 WaitForMe

Posted 18 February 2020 - 09:14 PM

I saw a mum recently dragging their sick younger child into the school yard. The younger child did a massive vomit in the school yard, poor thing. But the mum didn't really have a choice, I would've done the same thing...

#74 spr_maiden

Posted 18 February 2020 - 09:22 PM

^^ thought someone did.  Not you. If you wouldn't do it,  I guess my comment makes sense, that I would find it surprising to request. I wouldn't really expect a walk to the gate either - instructions to go there,  but we're saying that same thing.

#75 Prancer is coming

Posted 18 February 2020 - 10:20 PM

I am fine with leaving kids in car (have left babies sleeping in the car in my off street driveway when the temp is appropriate) and tend to be laid back in this stuff and happy to leave child at home, but I would not leave them in a car.

Part of it probably is opinions of others.  I have had a friend charged for having her kid left in the car, even with an 11 yo sibling supervising, so I rarely leave my own 11yo in the car.  I think a lot of me not doing it is the kids are in a very public space.




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