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Leaving an 8 year old in a cool car?


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#76 Lou-bags

Posted 18 February 2020 - 10:31 PM

View Postspr_maiden, on 18 February 2020 - 09:22 PM, said:

I wouldn't really expect a walk to the gate either -

For 4yo kindy and FYOS/preprimary the kids aren’t allowed to leave the classroom until a parent or other known adult is there to collect them, and so Id have had to ask someone to walk him out. I am still getting used to year one DS1 being free to leave once the bell goes, especially as the kids are all still collected by someone at the classroom.

I just assumed that as OP had said she’d leave her 8yo in the car, that the younger one needed to be collected in person.

#77 Ruf~Feral~es

Posted 18 February 2020 - 10:46 PM

This is bringing back memories of walking backwards to the letterbox, just saying.......

#78 born.a.girl

Posted 19 February 2020 - 06:24 AM

View PostLou-bags, on 18 February 2020 - 10:31 PM, said:

For 4yo kindy and FYOS/preprimary the kids aren’t allowed to leave the classroom until a parent or other known adult is there to collect them, and so Id have had to ask someone to walk him out. I am still getting used to year one DS1 being free to leave once the bell goes, especially as the kids are all still collected by someone at the classroom.

I just assumed that as OP had said she’d leave her 8yo in the car, that the younger one needed to be collected in person.


Absolutely the individual school's setup will determine whether or not parents even can get their kid to come to the gate.

Ours left the classroom, with prep teacher standing outside to make sure no kid was left there - but if a kid had zoomed off round the corner (about 20m from the open gate) they'd never have known.

#79 TheGreenSheep

Posted 19 February 2020 - 06:51 AM

Leave it to EB to take it to the extremes...

OP, what did you end up deciding to do with your sick child at school pick up?

#80 Soontobegran

Posted 19 February 2020 - 08:04 AM

I fully support this law, it has to be there for the idiots who are rare but common enough to lead to tragic events but anyone who tried to fine me for leaving my sick ,8 year old NT child in a cool car for a few minutes to collect another child would see me in court.

There is a huge difference to being a young child who can not escape their harness and a child who can open a door and get out.


Same thing for leaving them in the car at the petrol station whilst I watch them from the cash register.

Edited by Soontobegran, 19 February 2020 - 08:06 AM.


#81 hills mum bec

Posted 19 February 2020 - 08:59 AM

I wouldn't even think twice about this, although may feel differently if I lived in the suburbs rather than a rural town.  The car park at our local supermarket often has cars with unattended children in the back seat.  I have left my own kids in the back seat and will come back to find them chatting to the unattended kids in the back seat of the car next door.  DD8 moans if we go to the supermarket on the way home from somewhere and it is too hot to leave her in the car.

#82 spr_maiden

Posted 19 February 2020 - 10:37 AM

And I think it's good to acknowledge that it's not always "idiots" who end up with tragic outcomes. The automatic nature of running tasks can catch any of us out. There is still a difference in these situations and making provisions for a child to be on their own fluff a few minutes because the parent can only be in 1 place at any 1 time.

#83 kerilyntaryn

Posted 19 February 2020 - 01:10 PM

Kids at our school were warned by police for riding or walking to or from school. They were under 12 and notes sent home. I wouldn't leave the child at home or in the car. Drive offs happens, people report. Never leave them even thinking it's cool or in the shade

#84 CrankyM

Posted 19 February 2020 - 01:25 PM

View Postkerilyntaryn, on 19 February 2020 - 01:10 PM, said:

Kids at our school were warned by police for riding or walking to or from school. They were under 12 and notes sent home. I wouldn't leave the child at home or in the car. Drive offs happens, people report. Never leave them even thinking it's cool or in the shade

Really??? Kids at our school (many of which are children of police officers) are encouraged to walk or ride to and from school. The only information sent home was about children under 10 needing to be either with an older child or an adult because they do not have the spatial ability to cross roads safely.

I seriously think I live in a different country with the differences we see where I live compared to what I read on EB.

#85 Lucrezia Bauble

Posted 19 February 2020 - 01:31 PM

same. kids from our school are walking home on their own from around year 5 (NSW) - riding bikes too - without adult or older kid escort.


#86 Claudia Jean

Posted 19 February 2020 - 01:35 PM

View Postkerilyntaryn, on 19 February 2020 - 01:10 PM, said:

Kids at our school were warned by police for riding or walking to or from school. They were under 12 and notes sent home. I wouldn't leave the child at home or in the car. Drive offs happens, people report. Never leave them even thinking it's cool or in the shade
Whaaaa?   What state do you live in?  IME after term three of prep, kids are on their own as soon as the bell rings!

Edited by Claudia Jean, 19 February 2020 - 10:44 PM.


#87 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 19 February 2020 - 01:36 PM

View Postkerilyntaryn, on 19 February 2020 - 01:10 PM, said:

Kids at our school were warned by police for riding or walking to or from school. They were under 12 and notes sent home. I wouldn't leave the child at home or in the car. Drive offs happens, people report. Never leave them even thinking it's cool or in the shade

Why?

It has to be more than kids walking and riding home.

Kind of like that letter that went around FB from the police that was for one specific school because there were kids walking along a bloody highway and messing about while doing so. It was specific to that area and that incident, not a blanket rule for the whole country.

Edited by ~Jolly_F~, 19 February 2020 - 01:37 PM.


#88 EsmeLennox

Posted 19 February 2020 - 01:41 PM

Crime stats are down, folks. Statistically, our kids have never been safer.

We need to wind back alarmism in our communities.

#89 Lucrezia Bauble

Posted 19 February 2020 - 01:48 PM

View PostEsmeLennox, on 19 February 2020 - 01:41 PM, said:

Crime stats are down, folks. Statistically, our kids have never been safer.

We need to wind back alarmism in our communities.

exactly.

the main thing i would be worried about wrt my kid walking home is crossing roads, and idiots in cars going too fast. but - that’s a risk we all have to take or we’d never leave the house. the most violent crime that happened in our neighbourhood - 3 doors down from us, happened in the home.


#90 Gonzy

Posted 19 February 2020 - 02:00 PM

When my oldest were in ps (both in high school now), parents were asked to make arrangements other than kids walking or riding home as we had a spate of flashers and attempted child abductions :(

It's accurate to say that crime stats are down, but that doesn't account for individual experiences, anxieties or fears and so I think we have to allow room for those factors to colour the decisions all parents make.

#91 hills mum bec

Posted 19 February 2020 - 02:07 PM

View PostMayaTheGrinch, on 19 February 2020 - 01:25 PM, said:

Really??? Kids at our school (many of which are children of police officers) are encouraged to walk or ride to and from school. The only information sent home was about children under 10 needing to be either with an older child or an adult because they do not have the spatial ability to cross roads safely.

I seriously think I live in a different country with the differences we see where I live compared to what I read on EB.

Our school actively encourages students from year 5+ to walk or ride a bike to and from school (I think it may even be part of an official council campaign for students to do so) and pays for all the students in year 5 & 6 to have one weekly lesson of bike education for one term every year.  Students in year 5 would be 9-10yo's and there would be plenty of them making their own way to and from school.  Our school even expanded and upgraded their bike shelter a couple of years ago for this purpose.




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