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Reception readers


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#1 sandshoes

Posted 22 February 2020 - 08:08 PM

Hi everyone.
DS has started reception in SA this year. He's on level 3 readers. Everyone started level 1 readers in week 1. He can read level 3s quite well. Do I push him to do his reading assessment to a level 4 or leave the 3s for a while longer and focus on sight words and word sounds. I'm guessing the expectation end of term 4 is at a level 5 or higher. I really don't know SA level guidelines. He likes reading and would like him to focus on it now before the boredom of it sets in.

He wants to read his grug books at home but have put them away for the time being. I wouldn't have a clue what level grug books are.

Thanks

#2 PatG

Posted 22 February 2020 - 08:13 PM

Generally the readers sent home are on the easier side of things for the kids. Have him read what is sent home plus anything else he wants to read. If he wants to read Grug then help him read Grug.

#3 PrincessPeach

Posted 22 February 2020 - 08:20 PM

I'd give him another week with them, but then mention to the teacher that he is finding the home readers rather easy.

Big Mr's FYOS teacher specifically requested we mention to her directly (or via notes/email if we couldnt make it to the classroom), if the home readers were too hard or too easy.

I have noticed there is quite a variance in the difficulty of the books even within the same level.

ETA - our school must be odd, because the home readers are the level the kid is at.

Edited by PrincessPeach, 22 February 2020 - 08:26 PM.


#4 Heather11

Posted 22 February 2020 - 08:21 PM

Quote

He wants to read his grug books at home but have put them away for the time being. I wouldn't have a clue what level grug books are.


Why have you put the Grug books away?  If he wants to read them in addition to his reader then don't discourage it. There is nothing stopping him from reading any book he wants to.

Do you mean that you are going to discuss with the teacher that he do another reading test?  Just remember they probably have 20+ children to assess in limited time and it might take awhile before get around to testing him again.

#5 Crombek

Posted 22 February 2020 - 08:21 PM

Let him read whatever he wants at home. All words are good words.

Usually home readers are a level or 2 lower than their actual level- the point is to consolidate what they have a already learned. The actual learning is for school time.

#6 sandshoes

Posted 22 February 2020 - 08:28 PM

View PostHeather11, on 22 February 2020 - 08:21 PM, said:



Why have you put the Grug books away?  If he wants to read them in addition to his reader then don't discourage it. There is nothing stopping him from reading any book he wants to.

Do you mean that you are going to discuss with the teacher that he do another reading test?  Just remember they probably have 20+ children to assess in limited time and it might take awhile before get around to testing him again.

He has quite a large number of books that have been given as gifts, handed down books and ones that I've bought over the holidays which look like a level 1 3 word sentence. The grug books were done to death last year at kindy  so I've put them away to read something different, it was all we were reading day in and day out. I was starting to wonder if he could actually read the words or if he's memorised the pages.

I've noticed a variance in some level 3s. I'll keep him reading a little while longer.

#7 Expelliarmus

Posted 22 February 2020 - 08:29 PM

The minimum expected level by the end of Reception is level 5. The average level at the end of Reception is around 8-9.

Many schools haven't - and dare I say shouldn't have - given readers to Reception students yet. It's only Week 4. They shouldn't really be sent home until Term 2.

Get the Grug books back out. He needs to be enjoying way more books than readers. Get out the Grug, anything he brings from the library and anything on your shelf. Do not fixate on reader levels. Do not worry bout the assessments - read whatever he wants to read and can read. The take home readers are immaterial. If there is a reading log you need to fill out just put in whatever you read in addition to the readers.

Just Read Books.

ETA: He can read books 'higher' than his level. Don't limit him to books that look like level 3. I'll give you a little secret - level 3 isn't even anything meaningful. Levels 1-3 are just designed for book orientation, page turning, one to one word correspondence and a bit of letter/word recognition.

Read whatever you like. Ignore the readers.

Edited by Expelliarmus, 22 February 2020 - 08:32 PM.


#8 tenar

Posted 22 February 2020 - 08:45 PM

Give him books he enjoys!  If that's Grug so be it (and thank your lucky stars that with a boy you may not have to see endless Rainbow Fairy books in the future...).

Go to the library and choose some interesting books.  Look for ones that are great to read aloud, some that have patterns in the words (he can help you to read them), ones that have no words at all (you can talk about the story).  

If he enjoys books he will learn to read and read well.  The enjoyment is the most important thing by far.

#9 sandshoes

Posted 22 February 2020 - 09:05 PM

Thanks for the input. I'll dig the grug books back out.

#10 Ozquoll

Posted 22 February 2020 - 09:33 PM

I'll read Grug books with your kid if you read Mr Men books with my kid 😒. Buying the complete set of Mr Men Books was one of my worst parenting decisions....

#11 Jingleflea

Posted 22 February 2020 - 09:53 PM

DD ended up with one Mr Men book, it was terrible!
I've happily bought every Grug book ever written(though I think there's one new one I missed about Easter) and at 9 and reading the Hobbit, DD still likes Grug.

We would do the reader given out (think we started in week 5 in FYOS) and then DD nad Dh would read what ever SHE chose, reading should be fun, not a chore or only what we're told to read.

Our school did colour levels, so people weren't hung up on what level their child was at.

There was I think 1 to 10 in the first box, 11 to 20 in the second and 21 to 30 in the 3rd. The kids got to choose from the appropriate book whatever they liked the look of(well, they did when I was doing them as parent helper) to help foster i love of reading.

#12 nom_de_plume

Posted 23 February 2020 - 06:47 AM

We were told they send home easier books as readers, several levels below what they are reading in class. Our school didn’t care what the child read, as long as they were doing 15mins of reading per night. Some of the suggestions we were given included a recipe, magazine, instructions, library book, or any other book.

#13 kimasa

Posted 23 February 2020 - 07:54 AM

View PostOzquoll, on 22 February 2020 - 09:33 PM, said:

I'll read Grug books with your kid if you read Mr Men books with my kid 😒. Buying the complete set of Mr Men Books was one of my worst parenting decisions....

I'll trade you guys both for those bloody A4 sized Disney storybooks. Thanks MIL for buying DD a set of 10.

#14 Jingleflea

Posted 23 February 2020 - 10:24 AM

We had a kid who'd read motorbike magazines.
Or the Bunnings catalogue.

#15 PuddingPlease

Posted 23 February 2020 - 12:31 PM

Almost nothing is worse than Mr Men, they're so much more unpleasant than anyone remembers from their own childhood. Many of the books promote the values of conformity, pleasantry and forced good cheer over everything. The most terrifying example is when they "cure" poor Mr Nosy by violently attacking him until his behaviour changes.

The only kids book that disturbs me more is Rainbow Fish...yikes

#16 Dianalynch

Posted 23 February 2020 - 12:57 PM

Just read whatever he’s interested in, stick the sight words around the house if he’s keen to learn them, read to him in addition to him reading to you so he can hear expressions etc, still read whatever story books he’s interested in, talk about the books and whatever else you read together, and really just enjoy it - learning to read should be an enjoyable time, the levels don’t matter that much.

#17 CrankyM

Posted 23 February 2020 - 04:51 PM

 Jingleflea, on 23 February 2020 - 10:24 AM, said:

We had a kid who'd read motorbike magazines.
Or the Bunnings catalogue.

Cooking books for my younger kid. National geographic ones for the older kid (and fly guy).

As others have said just bring out the books he’s interested in. If he struggles to read them just read them to him or let him read the words in the sentence he knows or if he’s just struggling on the odd word model sounding it out.

#18 sandshoes

Posted 23 February 2020 - 09:15 PM

 Expelliarmus, on 22 February 2020 - 08:29 PM, said:

The minimum expected level by the end of Reception is level 5. The average level at the end of Reception is around 8-9.

Many schools haven't - and dare I say shouldn't have - given readers to Reception students yet. It's only Week 4. They shouldn't really be sent home until Term 2.

Get the Grug books back out. He needs to be enjoying way more books than readers. Get out the Grug, anything he brings from the library and anything on your shelf. Do not fixate on reader levels. Do not worry bout the assessments - read whatever he wants to read and can read. The take home readers are immaterial. If there is a reading log you need to fill out just put in whatever you read in addition to the readers.

Just Read Books.

ETA: He can read books 'higher' than his level. Don't limit him to books that look like level 3. I'll give you a little secret - level 3 isn't even anything meaningful. Levels 1-3 are just designed for book orientation, page turning, one to one word correspondence and a bit of letter/word recognition.

Read whatever you like. Ignore the readers.

I think ive read a few of your posts and your an SA teacher. Its odd, a few other mums that have children at predominately private schools and a couple of public schools have not had any readers come home or library bags.....its all shared text during school hours until term 2. All the receptions have done in 4 weeks is jolly phonics. It's opened my eyes how my sons school is heavily focused on reading first thing in the mornings each day, shared text later on, letter sounds (capital and lower case) reading 10minutes at home every night and practise 10 sight words each fortnight "as family time"

My son must have full on book worm teachers, or the teaching a composite R/1 class with 2 teachers year 1 work combined with the littlies.....no idea

#19 Prancer is coming

Posted 23 February 2020 - 09:41 PM

I know when my DD was in prep, she came home with books beneath her for the first few weeks.  I chose to do nothing, not wanting to be one of those parents!  But 4-6 weeks after school started, the teacher realised she could read and put her up.  The PIPS assessment helped with this. And then he teacher listened to herread  regularly and she was skipping a level or two every week or two for a while.

We just read the reader that came home and then did whatever.  Even though it was easy, she was not bored.  She just read it quickly, and those lower level readers are never long.  

it doesn’t matter if your kid is reading Grug or memorising it.  He is enjoying it and feels confident reading it by the sounds of things.

Edited by Prancer is coming, 24 February 2020 - 04:19 PM.


#20 Expelliarmus

Posted 23 February 2020 - 10:07 PM

 sandshoes, on 23 February 2020 - 09:15 PM, said:

I think ive read a few of your posts and your an SA teacher. Its odd, a few other mums that have children at predominately private schools and a couple of public schools have not had any readers come home or library bags.....its all shared text during school hours until term 2. All the receptions have done in 4 weeks is jolly phonics. It's opened my eyes how my sons school is heavily focused on reading first thing in the mornings each day, shared text later on, letter sounds (capital and lower case) reading 10minutes at home every night and practise 10 sight words each fortnight "as family time"

My son must have full on book worm teachers, or the teaching a composite R/1 class with 2 teachers year 1 work combined with the littlies.....no idea
That’s pretty full on for term 1 of Reception. If it’s an R/1 class that could explain it but even the R/1 class at work hasn’t sent home readers etc for the Receptions.

My class buddy reads with that class and the Reception students choose books from the reading corner while the Year 1 buddies help them swap levelled readers.

I dunno if they are ‘full on book worm teachers’ or simply ones who’ve not caught up on recent practice/research.

Edited by Expelliarmus, 23 February 2020 - 11:39 PM.


#21 Manicmum

Posted 23 February 2020 - 10:09 PM

My personal advice is to let them read the reader if they want. Then read what they want. Don’t even think about levels unless you are worried. Visit the library often.

#22 AnythingGoes

Posted 24 February 2020 - 06:17 AM

I would leave the teacher to it and not request assessments etc - they know what they are doing. Also I'd not worry about levels and just read what he wants at home (on top of the reader).

#23 seayork2002

Posted 24 February 2020 - 08:23 AM

DS read what he was given by the school and other books if he chose, He has finished primary but I had no idea what his reading level was (is?) never have unless he said 'mum X said I am up a leverl'

I know the school reader thing always comes up at the start of every school year on here but it really does not have to be a drama, by the time your child finishes their schooling their reading level will not really be an issue.

Just let your child read what they want

#24 iwanttosleepin

Posted 29 February 2020 - 07:28 PM

Our school just sends home random crap from the 'pink' box.  I would guess they range from level 1 to about level 6.  some are from the 1970s.  
So far, none have been decodable and as my preppie would be about a level 1/2 with great phonic skills but not much else he can't read them. I tick them and send them back unread.
They don't relate to the 'sight words' he's doing and they are just random and don't build on each other.

I long for the biff, chip and kipper books that my DS#2 learnt with.  Mostly decodable, sequential books that he loved.  Each one built on the storyline and words learnt in the previous one.

I have a set of phonic based Ruth Miskin books and so we just read them.  I'd love a set of Biff books but at over $10 each I can't justify.  We do have a set of Songbirds books that are decodable.

#25 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 01 March 2020 - 06:46 AM

i know you said you were going to get the grug books out but I wanted to chip in with why it is no problem even if he has 'memorised them'.

this memorisation is a vital stage of early reading. As expelli said a lot of the first stages of readers is about good reading technique.
If your son has mastered Grug he has developed a belief in himself that he can read , he is a reader.

You want to promote and increase that confidence so that when he has to work a bit harder to sound out trickier words or passages then that self belief will sustain him as he further develops his reading.




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