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Pressure Cookers


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#1 Tinkerbell13

Posted 24 February 2020 - 08:45 AM

I'm considering getting one but I don't want another appliance used a handful of times and then put in the back of the pantry.

I have a slow cooker but find the liquid is just that, liquid.  We love more a gravy consistence. I know you can thicken the liquid but I find it's not as flavorsome.

Would love your thoughts on one and how often you use it ?? Any downsides ?

Thanks all :-)

#2 seayork2002

Posted 24 February 2020 - 08:47 AM

View PostTinkerbell13, on 24 February 2020 - 08:45 AM, said:

I'm considering getting one but I don't want another appliance used a handful of times and then put in the back of the pantry.

I have a slow cooker but find the liquid is just that, liquid.  We love more a gravy consistence. I know you can thicken the liquid but I find it's not as flavorsome.

Would love your thoughts on one and how often you use it ?? Any downsides ?

Thanks all :-)

sorry no help but following as I think the exact same thing!

#3 Moukmouk

Posted 24 February 2020 - 09:04 AM

I really like mine, but yes, sometimes the liquid is still a bit too liquid. It's a bit of a learning curve working out how much less liquid to put in. I've got the philips multicooker, so it can saute in the pot and work as a slow cooker as well. It also keeps things warm once cooked. I like that I can put something like a soup or stew on and go out to swim squad without worrying about leaving the oven on.

#4 hills mum bec

Posted 24 February 2020 - 09:10 AM

I've got a Russell Hobbs multi cooker but I'm not a fan.  I end up with a much thicker gravy in my regular slow cooker than I do using the multi cooker on pressure setting.  I have no idea if I am using it wrong but it has been sitting in the back of the cupboard for a few years now.

#5 Ladyvolks

Posted 24 February 2020 - 09:13 AM

I have one and love it, but it’s pretty much just a faster version of a slow cooker.  

You cook the same sorts of things, and you have the same liquidy issues.

I would wait until your slow cooker needs replacing and then just buy a multi cooker instead to replace it.

I bought a Breville Fast Slow Pro based off EB recommendations and it’s great.

#6 Ho Ho No

Posted 24 February 2020 - 09:23 AM

I have a Breville Fast Slow Pro (multi/pressure/slow cooker).

When slow cooking, I only add 1/2 cup of liquid to prevent sticking/burning. When pressure cooking, I add the bare minimum of liquid.

It has a reduce function that I use at the end to evaporate & thicken.

#7 SummerStar

Posted 24 February 2020 - 09:25 AM

Everything I've ever made in my pressure cooker has burnt. Following the instructions exactly. I have a slow cooker that has the simmer and sear function so I find thickening gravy easy with some corn flour and turn on the simmer for a bit.

We also now have a thermal cooker I'm dying to try which apparently stops things being overcooked too.

Edited by SummerStar, 24 February 2020 - 09:25 AM.


#8 Riotproof

Posted 24 February 2020 - 09:31 AM

I have had a Tefal Cook4Me and now I have a crockpot express.

It is a learning curve, but once you understand that the liquid that goes in will still be there at the end, you learn how to adjust your own recipes. I wouldn’t survive without mine at all. It easily gets used 5 times a week.

#9 can'tstayaway

Posted 24 February 2020 - 10:18 AM

View PostTinkerbell13, on 24 February 2020 - 08:45 AM, said:

I have a slow cooker but find the liquid is just that, liquid.  We love more a gravy consistence. I know you can thicken the liquid but I find it's not as flavorsome.
A pressure cooker allows for minimal evaporation so you won’t get that thick gravy consistency that you get from cooking in a cast iron pot in the oven.  Alcohol also doesn’t evaporate out in the pressure cooker so I use much less if I’m adding wine.

I have a Breville Fast Slow cooker and love it. It’s one of those appliances that I will go out and replace same day if it died.

However, I don’t cook casseroles in it for the family (I do for the dog though lol). I just feel that nothing replaces the flavour of the traditional cast iron method. I make my own stocks in the pressure cooker which extracts an insane amount of flavour in a short space of time and use that stock in my casseroles.

When I was short on time during the evenings for dinner prep, I would often cook the next night’s meal a day or two earlier and then freeze/chill in the fridge. Casseroles and stews always taste better made ahead of time too. On the night of serving, it just had to be reheated which is quick and easy to do.

If I wanted to make it all in one go in a pressure cooker, I would reduce the liquid amount (and take into account any liquid from vegetables) and use a super concentrated stock.

#10 Riotproof

Posted 24 February 2020 - 10:36 AM

You will also find there are some good recipes out there and some seriously bad recipes out. If they say just use the same ingredients but less time for pressure cooking, they do not understand how the method works.

#11 Mrs Zee

Posted 24 February 2020 - 10:42 AM

View PostHo Ho No, on 24 February 2020 - 09:23 AM, said:

I have a Breville Fast Slow Pro (multi/pressure/slow cooker).

When slow cooking, I only add 1/2 cup of liquid to prevent sticking/burning. When pressure cooking, I add the bare minimum of liquid.

It has a reduce function that I use at the end to evaporate & thicken.

Same. I remove the meat and veg before reducing the sauce. It's my favourite function.

#12 Mrs Zee

Posted 24 February 2020 - 10:47 AM

View Postcan, on 24 February 2020 - 10:18 AM, said:



I have a Breville Fast Slow cooker and love it. It’s one of those appliances that I will go out and replace same day if it died.


Just on that note, mine did die and I panicked. Then took it to a small appliance repaired who replaced some fuse all for the grand total of $34 including labour. I've had another 18 months out of it so far.

#13 blue86

Posted 24 February 2020 - 11:20 AM

Doesn’t anyone use a stove top one anymore? I couldn’t live without mine, especially in winter

#14 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 24 February 2020 - 11:29 AM

I love my stove top pressure cooker, I find everything has so much more flavour. I can’t use my cast iron oven pots anymore, but I find the pressure cooker an excellent way to do things.

#15 IamOzgirl

Posted 24 February 2020 - 01:34 PM

I think the electric ones became popular because of the perceived risks with the stove top ones.

I def reduce the liquid I use for the pressure cooker function on my multi cooker.

Someone on every shared a great article years ago about why pressure cooker is better for flavour.

For those with only a slow cooker. If you can just take the lid off for the last hour of cooking.

Re excess liquid. Remember even if you have no extra liquid added most foods are made up of liquid. And with the seal on for the pressure it has no where to go, add on top of that condensation as well and that’s why you need to use less liquid overall.

#16 Ho Ho No

Posted 24 February 2020 - 11:11 PM

I wouldn't have bought a stove top pressure cooker. No real reason, I've just never used one so it just wasn't on my radar.

I didn't actually intend to buy an electric one either. I was shopping for a new slow cooker and Breville happened to be doing a demonstration that day.

Now I love it!

#17 Lesley225

Posted 24 February 2020 - 11:34 PM

View Postblue86, on 24 February 2020 - 11:20 AM, said:

Doesn’t anyone use a stove top one anymore? I couldn’t live without mine, especially in winter
  yes i have  a stovetop one and think  it's great.  It's just another saucepan so.no waste and has the standard psi so all recipes work.  I don't think the electronic ones do the standard psi so you'd have to convert.

Edited by Lesley225, 24 February 2020 - 11:35 PM.


#18 Riotproof

Posted 25 February 2020 - 06:04 AM

There are plenty of charts out there that do that.
The benefit of electric is that you can walk away and leave it to release naturally without having to do anything. Also the timer is inbuilt.

#19 can'tstayaway

Posted 25 February 2020 - 07:37 AM

View PostRiotproof, on 25 February 2020 - 06:04 AM, said:

There are plenty of charts out there that do that.
The benefit of electric is that you can walk away and leave it to release naturally without having to do anything. Also the timer is inbuilt.
Exactly.

I originally bought my electric pressure cooker for the convenience of being able to put dinner on to cook and then leave the house to do the school and extra curriculars run. Then get home to a hot, yummy dinner with no gagging about.

Once using it, I noticed how good the results were and began to use it for more and more dishes. It’s so convenient and takes no supervision so I don’t have to worry about getting distracted. Same reason I switched to an electric kettle over a stove top one, I can put it one and walk away without worrying about it boiling dry while I’m just putting on some washing or whatever.

#20 Riotproof

Posted 25 February 2020 - 08:08 AM

It is really good for that, can’tstayaway. I’m making beef Barbacoa for tacos tonight, which I will put on before I leave for swimming. It keeps warm for 4 hours after cooking, so it will be shreddable whenever we get home.

And the results compared to a slow cooker are just out of this world.

#21 Riotproof

Posted 25 February 2020 - 08:10 AM

It is really good for that, can’tstayaway. I’m making beef Barbacoa for tacos tonight, which I will put on before I leave for swimming. It keeps warm for 4 hours after cooking, so it will be shreddable whenever we get home.

And the results compared to a slow cooker are just out of this world.

#22 Moukmouk

Posted 25 February 2020 - 10:38 AM

View PostRiotproof, on 25 February 2020 - 08:10 AM, said:

It is really good for that, can’tstayaway. I’m making beef Barbacoa for tacos tonight, which I will put on before I leave for swimming. It keeps warm for 4 hours after cooking, so it will be shreddable whenever we get home.

And the results compared to a slow cooker are just out of this world.

I just googled beef Barbacoa. There's tomorrow night's post cricket training dinner sorted!

I also like the pressure cooker if I'm cooking a few things at once.

#23 Riotproof

Posted 25 February 2020 - 10:57 AM

It’s really delicious, Moukmouk, I like the gimmesomeoven version, except I leave out the green chillis from the cooking.

#24 can'tstayaway

Posted 25 February 2020 - 12:00 PM

I’ve just googled that barbacoa recipe too. Looks great. There’s our Friday taco night protein sorted.

Riotproof - what adjustments do you make for the pressure cooker?  Or do you use the slow cooker function?

#25 Riotproof

Posted 25 February 2020 - 12:15 PM

I use this recipe. https://www.gimmesom...-barbacoa-beef/ Pressure cook 60 minutes with a quick release, I may shorten the time slightly today as I won’t be home to release, so will do it naturally.




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