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Car insurance excess


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11 replies to this topic

#1 redleaves

Posted 27 February 2020 - 08:20 PM

On my way home from work today, someone ran up the back of my car. It is only minor damage, but I will have to make an insurance claim to fix it.

He is clearly at fault as he said he was 'looking down' when he ran into me.

Will I be charged an excess for my claim as it is his fault?

thanks

#2 Cheesy Sanga

Posted 27 February 2020 - 08:33 PM

If you have all his details then give them to your insurance company to sort out. Your company may want you to pay the excess up front and then they'll pay it back once the fault is determined for sure.

#3 Coffeegirl

Posted 27 February 2020 - 08:33 PM

Your insurer can claim the excess form him if you were not at fault.

they may make you pay it up front though if you need repairs faster than he/his insurer pays up.  Then you are reimbursed

#4 PatG

Posted 27 February 2020 - 08:45 PM

You will need his name and address and the make and model of his car and they generally won't charge you excess and reimburse, the total cost gets billed to other driver/insurance. rear end collisions are usually obviously the fault of the rear car.

#5 #YKG

Posted 27 February 2020 - 08:54 PM

The one time someone hit my car in a parking lot I just gave my insurance their name, contact number and insurer details. They sorted it out and I didn’t pay the excess.

#6 Feral-as-Meggs

Posted 27 February 2020 - 08:58 PM

No you shouldn’t have to pay, even up-front.  

Sometimes they try it on if you can only give a name and address, not a phone number.  Or sometimes you have a work and not home address.  If that happens, just say you will go to the ombudsman.

#7 born.a.girl

Posted 27 February 2020 - 09:14 PM

It depends.  Insurance companies know each other.


Sometimes they will make you pay upfront, as they're not convinced they'll get it from the other party.  If they are convinced, then they won't make you pay it.

If you car is driveable, then I'd wait until they can confirm no excess.

We did that when a woman reversed into my husband's car.

Poor woman was only trying to avoid a vehicle cannoning towards her from another accident, but we didn't want to find ourselves fighting for the excess in a year's time.

#8 -Emissary-

Posted 27 February 2020 - 10:14 PM

Who are you with?

I’ve made claims with AAMI, GIO, Allianz and NRMA for not at fault accidents (usually a rear end) and have never been asked to pay the excess first.

#9 aprilrainatxmas

Posted 27 February 2020 - 11:19 PM

I have had similar happen. Firstly, is he actually properly insured? I.e. comprehensive or at least Third Party Property (not just CTP with his rego) I am amazed by how many drivers aren't.

We had a man in his twenties plough into the back of us, he thought he was covered. Um...no! Only CTP.  We only had Third party property, fire and theft BUT as a lot of insurance companies do now RACQ cover this situation( if it completely the other drivers fault) to about $3000 if you have all their details and they then go after them.

#10 Expelliarmus

Posted 27 February 2020 - 11:31 PM

The rear driver is at fault regardless of if they were looking up or down.

I didn't need to pay excess when I was rear-ended, nor did I need to prove fault - it was already proven because I was the front car and the rear car is automatically at fault. The insurance company did need the drivers details though.

#11 UndergroundKelpie

Posted 28 February 2020 - 05:46 AM

View PostExpelliarmus, on 27 February 2020 - 11:31 PM, said:

The rear driver is at fault regardless of if they were looking up or down.

I didn't need to pay excess when I was rear-ended, nor did I need to prove fault - it was already proven because I was the front car and the rear car is automatically at fault. The insurance company did need the drivers details though.

Not always at fault. I once rear ended a car. They had no brake lights and stopped suddenly. I was paying attention and managed to mostly stop and just nudge the back of their car, they were at fault and had to pay for the repairs on my motorbike. There was about 5k worth of damages to my bike.

In response to the OP, I have never had to pay the excess when the other driver was at fault except twice, once was above with my motorbike and they reimbursed me, the other the person was driving unregistered. I think my insurance company took them to court.

#12 born.a.girl

Posted 28 February 2020 - 05:49 AM

View PostUndergroundKelpie, on 28 February 2020 - 05:46 AM, said:

Not always at fault. I once rear ended a car. They had no brake lights and stopped suddenly. I was paying attention and managed to mostly stop and just nudge the back of their car, they were at fault and had to pay for the repairs on my motorbike. There was about 5k worth of damages to my bike.

In response to the OP, I have never had to pay the excess when the other driver was at fault except twice, once was above with my motorbike and they reimbursed me, the other the person was driving unregistered. I think my insurance company took them to court.


I was a witness to an accident once, where a bloke took a young woman's 'braking distance' so that when the traffic came to a sudden standstill around a second later, she had no hope of stopping in time - he did because his car was higher and hers was low.

He was found to be at fault.  If I hadn't stopped and told her she wasn't at fault she'd have been up for a fortune given she was a very young P Plater.

Bloke tried to wriggle out of it all sorts of ways. Must say RACV insurance (both were insured with them) were very good and supportive of her.




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