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Need advice on new dog


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#1 dessy123

Posted 05 April 2020 - 06:06 PM

I have just gotten a 5 yr old beagle x. Was trying to do the responsible thing and not get a puppy, as we alll know how much work they can be. What I wasn't expecting is for this guy to be so unsettled, I am aware it is normal, but as I am unexperienced with dogs, I am unsure how to help him settle in.

He constantly runs to the front door and front windows and scratches and barks...he was doing it the whole night last night...I tried to put him out the back for a little bit, as I was so tired and needed sleep, he hated it, was scratching at the door and barking..

It's hard as Im unaware of his history, he is clearly anxious, but overall a friendly little guy who loves cuddles and is amazing with the kids and cats.

Im not sure how to help settle him in? Any help or advice woud be amazing!

#2 Romeo Void

Posted 05 April 2020 - 06:08 PM

Beagles are hard work at any age. I hope someone has some ideas to help him settle

#3 *Spikey*

Posted 05 April 2020 - 06:54 PM

Beagles need training. Lots of training. Lots and LOTS of training. You can get all the stuff you need for clicker training online.

The more you do, the happier he will be because he will know where he stands.

I also recommend crate training. See the sticky thread above.

#4 BornToLove

Posted 05 April 2020 - 06:54 PM

Does he have a crate?

#5 The new me

Posted 05 April 2020 - 06:55 PM

I know he is 5 and someone else may have more idea of this, but you may want to consider crate training him.

Giving him a safe space where he can be locked away at night etc.  it would be hell to start with (even with a puppy it's not always easy) but it may be worth it in the end.

Maybe someone with experience of doing this with a adult dog can comment

Good luck

#6 dessy123

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:09 PM

Thank you for the replies so far, no he doesnt have a crate, I will definetly look into that!

Im also concerned for when we all go back to school and work, have no idea how he will cope..he's currently getting three walks a day, this wont be sustainable long term..im hoping at least two walks a day will be doable..

#7 FiveAus

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:28 PM

We have brought a few adults dogs into the family, the most recent being a 4 year old Finnish Lapphund.
They can take months to settle, they are much more work in this area than a puppy.
You need to build trust and teach him how the family operates, where his spaces are, what's off limits etc. He also needs reassurance that this isn't going to change. Talk to him and tell him, they understand a whole lot more than you think they would.

Whatever situation he came from, whether it be a shelter, another family, a breeder etc, he's just had everything that's familiar to him taken away. And while it might not be the life you and I would want for a dog, it was his life and now everything has changed.

My Finnish Lapphund had come from another home in which he was a kennel and show dog. He came to us to be a show dog, but to live in the house. He was utterly miserable for weeks but with lots of walks and a regular, reassuring pattern to his life, he gradually settled in and now he's as happy as a dog can be.

#8 kadoodle

Posted 06 April 2020 - 10:09 AM

View Postdessy123, on 05 April 2020 - 07:09 PM, said:

Thank you for the replies so far, no he doesnt have a crate, I will definetly look into that!

Im also concerned for when we all go back to school and work, have no idea how he will cope..he's currently getting three walks a day, this wont be sustainable long term..im hoping at least two walks a day will be doable..

Beagles are working dogs, with lots of energy and drive. If you’re out during the day, you’ll need to leave him with a “job” to do, or he’ll find his own.

#9 dessy123

Posted 06 April 2020 - 10:22 PM

Thanks for the replies. Have found out some of his history today. The lady I got him off had him for 2 days..got him for free and onsold him for a profit..hes from a property.

They got rid of him due to his constant barking. He does need desexing im really helping that will help?? Im really unsure as to what to do..

Poor thing used to a huge property to run around on and now thrown into surburbia, and shipped between two different owners in a few days. Do I persevere? Or should he go to someone who has a property?

#10 *Spikey*

Posted 06 April 2020 - 10:54 PM

My guess is that he wasn't suitable for life on a property, so sending him to another would not be doing him a favour.

I'd encourage you to persevere, give him six months to build trust, manners and a bond with the family.

Beagles are food oriented, which makes training them relatively easy. My advice is get the crate, and do lots of little training sessions with him. Make opportunities to praise and reward him, and give him a very set routine.

#11 FiveAus

Posted 07 April 2020 - 05:46 AM

Desexing will just stop him wanting to have sex with any b**ch in season that's around (which is probably none), and will make little to no difference to his behaviour.

Dogs bark for lots of reasons, but often because they're really bored. Keep him occupied, like Spikey says lots of little training sessions, keep him in a routine, and maybe look at toys like Kongs which you can stuff and freeze, and give him something to focus on and think about.

Also, these ladies run online classes and they are fabulous with problem dogs.

https://www.facebook...09150377179148/

ETA, just because a dog is on a big property doesn't mean they are running around it exercising themselves. Usually they aren't. My dogs have an acre to run around on, if they're outside by themselves they are usually near the back door waiting for us to go outside.

Farm dogs don't have the run of the farm, they are usually kennelled when not being worked.

Long walks should be sufficient exercise. Also if you ride a bicycle, teach him to run alongside of it on a leash. My dogs absolutely love that and it's a fantastic bonding exercise, as well as keeping them fit.

Edited by FiveAus, 07 April 2020 - 05:49 AM.


#12 Isolated Old Elf

Posted 07 April 2020 - 07:12 AM

^^Bike riding while leading an animal is illegal in SA. Not sure about other states.
OP, do you live near a dog park or beach? Is your dog socialised? Obviously now is not the time to socialise, but when things return to normal, it might help?

#13 FiveAus

Posted 07 April 2020 - 08:35 AM

View PostSilly Old Elf, on 07 April 2020 - 07:12 AM, said:

^^Bike riding while leading an animal is illegal in SA. Not sure about other states.
OP, do you live near a dog park or beach? Is your dog socialised? Obviously now is not the time to socialise, but when things return to normal, it might help?

It's actually an ANKC title, 20 kms alongside a bike or runner at 10 kmph with 3 x vet checks along the way leads to an endurance title.
I've trained a couple of dogs, and one of them I used to ride him past the local police station (Vic) every evening.

#14 Isolated Old Elf

Posted 07 April 2020 - 03:38 PM

View PostFiveAus, on 07 April 2020 - 08:35 AM, said:



It's actually an ANKC title, 20 kms alongside a bike or runner at 10 kmph with 3 x vet checks along the way leads to an endurance title.
I've trained a couple of dogs, and one of them I used to ride him past the local police station (Vic) every evening.
I understand a fair bit about the endurance titles. It’s still illegal in SA

#15 dessy123

Posted 07 April 2020 - 04:44 PM

Thanks so much for the replies! very helpful. He actually slept the whole night last night which was awesome!

The weird thing is, ive bought him treats and yet to find one he likes? Hes not fussed with bones or toys either??

A routine would definetly benefit him. I will look into all options suggested, thank you. I feel there is hope!

#16 blimkybill

Posted 07 April 2020 - 04:57 PM

View Postdessy123, on 07 April 2020 - 04:44 PM, said:

Thanks so much for the replies! very helpful. He actually slept the whole night last night which was awesome!

The weird thing is, ive bought him treats and yet to find one he likes? Hes not fussed with bones or toys either??

A routine would definetly benefit him. I will look into all options suggested, thank you. I feel there is hope!
Dogs are complex creatures, and it sounds like you don't yet have a lot of experience with them. So I would, if you could afford it, 100% be engaging a dog trainer for a short period to teach YOU about training, understanding and caring for your dog. There is so much to learn (as I only realised later in adulthood when I partnered up with a dog person).

dog trainer can teach you all about
- how to teach the dog to behave certain ways, and to look to you as their leader
- how to meet your dog's needs (physical, social etc)
(because he'll be a much happier dog if his needs are met)
- how to minimise any anxiety which may be happening now or which may happen when you go back to work.

If your dog is still barking a lot, scratching the doors and windows a lot, doing damage - he may be highly anxious. Sometimes anxiety needs to be treated with medication, so if these behaviours persist I would also consult a vet. Anxiety in a dog can be made better or worse by how we treat them, but it can also be a personality trait (like in humans) and some dogs are very prone to it unfortunately.

#17 NannyPlumPudding

Posted 07 April 2020 - 05:45 PM

View Postblimkybill, on 07 April 2020 - 04:57 PM, said:

Dogs are complex creatures, and it sounds like you don't yet have a lot of experience with them. So I would, if you could afford it, 100% be engaging a dog trainer for a short period to teach YOU about training, understanding and caring for your dog. There is so much to learn (as I only realised later in adulthood when I partnered up with a dog person).

dog trainer can teach you all about
- how to teach the dog to behave certain ways, and to look to you as their leader
- how to meet your dog's needs (physical, social etc)
(because he'll be a much happier dog if his needs are met)
- how to minimise any anxiety which may be happening now or which may happen when you go back to work.

If your dog is still barking a lot, scratching the doors and windows a lot, doing damage - he may be highly anxious. Sometimes anxiety needs to be treated with medication, so if these behaviours persist I would also consult a vet. Anxiety in a dog can be made better or worse by how we treat them, but it can also be a personality trait (like in humans) and some dogs are very prone to it unfortunately.

This!  

OP, I'm a dog person.  I have grown up around multiple types of dogs, but my own dog threw me a curve ball.

I had to find out how to correctly let him know a certain behaviour wasn't acceptable.  I did the treats and everything but sometimes he needed to know that wasn't right.  I got a trainer in, they showed me the basics again.  Assessed out our family situation and we then tailored it.  In our case, my DP was destroying my training when he would come home from work lol so DP had to be trained essentially ;)

Anyway, definately try and get a trainer to help you out.  They will give you the skills to be able to create that harmonious life! But I will warn you, it does take time and consistency.  We are 2 years post trainer and I feel like only now have we started to see the results!

#18 FiveAus

Posted 08 April 2020 - 09:34 AM

View Postdessy123, on 07 April 2020 - 04:44 PM, said:

Thanks so much for the replies! very helpful. He actually slept the whole night last night which was awesome!

The weird thing is, ive bought him treats and yet to find one he likes? Hes not fussed with bones or toys either??

A routine would definetly benefit him. I will look into all options suggested, thank you. I feel there is hope!

When I got my Finnish Lapphund, he would barely eat. Only enough to keep him alive and even then he was skin and bone, hidden by a profuse coat so he didn't look as skinny as he was.

When he was offered treats, he'd just turn his head away. Zero interest.

Eventually I worked out that he associated food and treats with bad things (he hadn't been well treated in his former home) so I worked hard to change his perception of food.

The first thing I did was remove dog food from his diet. And the dog bowl. Instead he was served a rectangular shaped platter of bits and pieces...cooked steak offcuts, cottage cheese, grated cheese, tinned sardines etc. He was given his food in an enclosure where he was not disturbed by anyone or any of our other dogs, and given plenty of time to investigate it and eat it. He ate all of it every single time.

Gradually I reintroduced dog food and then the dog bowl. Within time he was eating the same as my other dogs, and with the same amount of enthusiasm.

With treats, I worked out that he associated treats with having to do things he didn't want to do. So I removed any expectations by taking a bag of bbq chicken pieces on our daily walks and just handing one to him as we walked. At first he was reluctant but he gradually accepted then, and then started to enjoy them. Now he lines up with the other dogs for his treats but I never put any expectations on him and never will.

#19 dessy123

Posted 08 April 2020 - 05:28 PM

View PostFiveAus, on 08 April 2020 - 09:34 AM, said:

When I got my Finnish Lapphund, he would barely eat. Only enough to keep him alive and even then he was skin and bone, hidden by a profuse coat so he didn't look as skinny as he was.

When he was offered treats, he'd just turn his head away. Zero interest.

Eventually I worked out that he associated food and treats with bad things (he hadn't been well treated in his former home) so I worked hard to change his perception of food.

The first thing I did was remove dog food from his diet. And the dog bowl. Instead he was served a rectangular shaped platter of bits and pieces...cooked steak offcuts, cottage cheese, grated cheese, tinned sardines etc. He was given his food in an enclosure where he was not disturbed by anyone or any of our other dogs, and given plenty of time to investigate it and eat it. He ate all of it every single time.

Gradually I reintroduced dog food and then the dog bowl. Within time he was eating the same as my other dogs, and with the same amount of enthusiasm.

With treats, I worked out that he associated treats with having to do things he didn't want to do. So I removed any expectations by taking a bag of bbq chicken pieces on our daily walks and just handing one to him as we walked. At first he was reluctant but he gradually accepted then, and then started to enjoy them. Now he lines up with the other dogs for his treats but I never put any expectations on him and never will.

Interesting, my dog is also refusing treats, and hardly eats..although he did eat the cats food..

He is super high energy and the only way i seem to get peace is if he has been for a long walk!

The barking is relentless! I will need to get in touch with a trainer to see how I can hopefully meet his needs.




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